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Harold Kim Philby

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NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Reuters
A former Soviet undercover agent in Britain said Thursday there had been a "fifth man" in the spy ring of British diplomats who worked for the Kremlin from the 1930s until three of them fled to Moscow. "There was definitely a fifth man. I knew him personally," Yuri Motin, a retired KGB colonel, told a news conference. He made the remarks after a press showing of "A Cambridge Graduate," a film about the life of Harold (Kim) Philby, the main figure in the ring.
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NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Reuters
A former Soviet undercover agent in Britain said Thursday there had been a "fifth man" in the spy ring of British diplomats who worked for the Kremlin from the 1930s until three of them fled to Moscow. "There was definitely a fifth man. I knew him personally," Yuri Motin, a retired KGB colonel, told a news conference. He made the remarks after a press showing of "A Cambridge Graduate," a film about the life of Harold (Kim) Philby, the main figure in the ring.
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NEWS
May 12, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Harold (Kim) Philby, the last surviving member of the triumvirate of spies who shook the British espionage system to its marrow 30 years ago, died Wednesday in Moscow. He was 76. A British Foreign Office spokesman made the announcement in London, saying, "We were told by the Soviet Embassy that he died today (Wednesday). We don't know what of, or how, or the circumstances, just that he died."
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Harold (Kim) Philby, the last surviving member of the triumvirate of spies who shook the British espionage system to its marrow 30 years ago, died Wednesday in Moscow. He was 76. A British Foreign Office spokesman made the announcement in London, saying, "We were told by the Soviet Embassy that he died today (Wednesday). We don't know what of, or how, or the circumstances, just that he died."
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | United Press International
Former double agent Kim Philby appeared on national Soviet television Thursday for the first time since his defection to the Soviet Union in 1963. Philby, 75, was interviewed for 10 minutes on a program dedicated to British author Graham Greene, Philby's lifelong friend and one-time subordinate in British intelligence. Philby, appearing healthy and speaking in English, answered questions from Soviet commentator Genrik Borovik, a fluent English speaker. The interview was dubbed in Russian.
NEWS
November 22, 1987 | From Reuters
British double agent Harold (Kim) Philby dismissed as "complete rubbish" suggestions he had been miserable since fleeing to Moscow 24 years ago but said he would like to return to England for a visit. Latvian Radio, in an interview broadcast by Radio Moscow's English service on Saturday, asked Philby to comment on reports that he lived in poverty in the Soviet Union. "Well, I could first of all say an extremely rude word, but I won't," he said.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
A former KGB double-agent has identified the long-secret "fifth man" in a notorious Soviet spy ring as John Cairncross, a former British intelligence officer. Oleg Gordievsky, a career KGB agent who worked for the British as a double-agent before escaping to the West in 1985, disclosed the man's identity in "KGB: The Inside Story," a new book excerpted today in the Times of London. It was written with Christopher Andrew, a Cambridge University historian.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | MARCUS ELIASON, Associated Press
On four recent Sundays, the ghost of treachery joined Britons at the breakfast table. Harold (Kim) Philby, the gentleman traitor who spied for the Soviet Union, granted his first interview to a Western journalist since defecting to Moscow in 1963, and it appeared in the Sunday Times beginning in March. Critics say publication of the four-part interview in the Times, with a circulation of 1.4 million, was a propaganda gift to the KGB. The Soviet secret police agency still employs Philby, now 76.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | Ciaran Giles, Associated Press
It was a war that fueled passion and anger like almost no other, spurring thousands from all around the globe to come and fight for their ideals. But instead of weapons, many used pens and typewriters. Spain's Cervantes Institute has captured a unique period in modern history by organizing a traveling exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the start of the country's three-year Civil War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1990 | ROGER SCRUTON, Roger Scruton is a writer and philosopher who teaches at the University of London.
Christmas is the season of goodwill, the time when enemies are forgiven and friends restored to favor. It is also a time of "rehabilitation," in which the outcasts return to the fold, to be welcomed back into human society.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | United Press International
Former double agent Kim Philby appeared on national Soviet television Thursday for the first time since his defection to the Soviet Union in 1963. Philby, 75, was interviewed for 10 minutes on a program dedicated to British author Graham Greene, Philby's lifelong friend and one-time subordinate in British intelligence. Philby, appearing healthy and speaking in English, answered questions from Soviet commentator Genrik Borovik, a fluent English speaker. The interview was dubbed in Russian.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2005 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
Last Call for Blackford Oakes A Novel William F. Buckley Jr. Harcourt: 354 pp., $25 * About a quarter of the way through "Last Call for Blackford Oakes," the 11th in William F. Buckley Jr.'s series of Cold War spy novels featuring the CIA's answer to James Bond, is a love scene perhaps only Buckley could write: " 'Do you hate Communism?' "Blackford contracted his stomach, and then said it. 'Yes.' " 'I like the directness of your language.' " 'Here is more directness. Will you marry me?'
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