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Harold Land

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Land, a tenor saxophonist with a forthright sound who was a key figure in several vital jazz groups dating to the 1950s and a strong presence in the L.A. jazz scene, died Friday. He was 72. Land suffered a stroke at his home early Friday and was taken to Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in West Los Angeles, said a friend, Clint Rosemond. He died at the hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Land, a tenor saxophonist with a forthright sound who was a key figure in several vital jazz groups dating to the 1950s and a strong presence in the L.A. jazz scene, died Friday. He was 72. Land suffered a stroke at his home early Friday and was taken to Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in West Los Angeles, said a friend, Clint Rosemond. He died at the hospital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Harold Land has been a member and leader of several important jazz groups. But the one that probably influenced his career more than any other isn't a musical group at all. It's his family. "Yes, I've always been a family man," the 68-year-old saxophonist said in a phone conversation from his home in L.A. "They've always been very important to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Harold Land has been a member and leader of several important jazz groups. But the one that probably influenced his career more than any other isn't a musical group at all. It's his family. "Yes, I've always been a family man," the 68-year-old saxophonist said in a phone conversation from his home in L.A. "They've always been very important to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
Displaying the class and imagination that has kept him in the upper echelon of jazz improvisers for almost 40 years, tenor saxophonist Harold Land led his quintet through several spirited numbers Sunday at the brunch at Windows on Hollywood. Though the band--composed of longtime partners Oscar Brashear, trumpet, Harold Land Jr., bassist Richard Reid and drummer Fritz Wise--hadn't performed in five months, one could hardly tell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Harold Land Jr. has one of the most distinguished names in jazz: his father's. Land Jr.--a pianist who has worked with the likes of Gerald Wilson, Pharoah Sanders and Marvin Gaye--is the son of Harold Land, a saxophonist who was at the forefront of the be-bop movement in the mid-'50s as a member of the Max Roach-Clifford Brown quintet. Actually, seeing the name on a billboard can mean one of three things: You'll hear Land Sr. blowing mature, assured tenor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the '50s, tenor saxman Harold Land spent almost all his free timeover at Eric Dolphy's pad, jamming with the local heavies. Dolphy, the revered, Los Angeles-born saxophonist, flutist, clarinetist and musical pioneer who died in 1964, held long-running jam sessions that have taken on legendary status, first at his parents' home, then at his own apartment near Exhibition and La Cienega boulevards. Land, who plays tonight at the Hyatt Newporter in Newport Beach, remembers the scene well.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Apparently, recording companies aren't interested in one of jazz's living legends. Los Angeles saxophonist Harold Land came up in the Max Roach-Clifford Brown Quintet of the mid-1950s and co-led a quintet from 1969 to 1971 with vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson. At 63, he is in peak musical form, yet he hasn't released a recording as a leader in eight years.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
The jazz man, recently returned from gigs in Paris and Rome, walked in dressed as a gentleman of the piazza: black ventless suit with suppressed lapels, black pinpoint dress shirt, floral print Italian silk tie. He moved slowly and elegantly to the stage to greet his young blue-jeaned California sidemen, extending his 66-year-old hand and cocking his head slightly to reveal the ever-ironic smile. Harold Land Sr. is like that. Probably given that handshake, that smile, five thousand times before.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The Timeless All-Stars may have been the brainchild of a European record producer, but the group has its roots in Southern California. Central to this California connection is the long association of Harold Land and Bobby Hutcherson, who have been playing together here since the mid '60s. The sextet--vibraphonist Hutcherson, tenor saxophonist Land, trombonist Curtis Fuller, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Buster Williams and drummer Billy Higgins--will open the Pacific Jazz Festival on Saturday at the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa, with pianist Billy Childs sitting in for Walton (who's in Japan with his trio)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Harold Land Jr. has one of the most distinguished names in jazz: his father's. Land Jr.--a pianist who has worked with the likes of Gerald Wilson, Pharoah Sanders and Marvin Gaye--is the son of Harold Land, a saxophonist who was at the forefront of the be-bop movement in the mid-'50s as a member of the Max Roach-Clifford Brown quintet. Actually, seeing the name on a billboard can mean one of three things: You'll hear Land Sr. blowing mature, assured tenor.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
The jazz man, recently returned from gigs in Paris and Rome, walked in dressed as a gentleman of the piazza: black ventless suit with suppressed lapels, black pinpoint dress shirt, floral print Italian silk tie. He moved slowly and elegantly to the stage to greet his young blue-jeaned California sidemen, extending his 66-year-old hand and cocking his head slightly to reveal the ever-ironic smile. Harold Land Sr. is like that. Probably given that handshake, that smile, five thousand times before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the '50s, tenor saxman Harold Land spent almost all his free timeover at Eric Dolphy's pad, jamming with the local heavies. Dolphy, the revered, Los Angeles-born saxophonist, flutist, clarinetist and musical pioneer who died in 1964, held long-running jam sessions that have taken on legendary status, first at his parents' home, then at his own apartment near Exhibition and La Cienega boulevards. Land, who plays tonight at the Hyatt Newporter in Newport Beach, remembers the scene well.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Apparently, recording companies aren't interested in one of jazz's living legends. Los Angeles saxophonist Harold Land came up in the Max Roach-Clifford Brown Quintet of the mid-1950s and co-led a quintet from 1969 to 1971 with vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson. At 63, he is in peak musical form, yet he hasn't released a recording as a leader in eight years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The Timeless All-Stars may have been the brainchild of a European record producer, but the group has its roots in Southern California. Central to this California connection is the long association of Harold Land and Bobby Hutcherson, who have been playing together here since the mid '60s. The sextet--vibraphonist Hutcherson, tenor saxophonist Land, trombonist Curtis Fuller, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Buster Williams and drummer Billy Higgins--will open the Pacific Jazz Festival on Saturday at the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa, with pianist Billy Childs sitting in for Walton (who's in Japan with his trio)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
Displaying the class and imagination that has kept him in the upper echelon of jazz improvisers for almost 40 years, tenor saxophonist Harold Land led his quintet through several spirited numbers Sunday at the brunch at Windows on Hollywood. Though the band--composed of longtime partners Oscar Brashear, trumpet, Harold Land Jr., bassist Richard Reid and drummer Fritz Wise--hadn't performed in five months, one could hardly tell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some musicians, the progeny of stars and legends, must bear the weight of their own names. Such artists as drummer T.S. Monk, son of composer-pianist Thelonious Monk, Rene McLean, son of saxophonist Jackie McLean, and pianist Harold Land Jr., son of saxophonist Harold Land, will forever be associated with their parents' fame, even though they've established strong identities of their own. The same might be said of singer Michelle Coltrane, who appeared Sunday at Spaghettini.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Max Roach, a leader of the modern jazz revolution of the 1940s whose innovative approach to drumming forever changed the way the instrument was played and perceived, died Thursday. He was 83. Roach died in a New York hospital, according to an announcement from Blue Note Records. No cause of death was given, but Roach was known to have been in failing health for some time. His achievements reached well beyond his importance as a jazz drummer.
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