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Harold N Crowder

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The mandate from the community was to clean up the streets of Hollywood, and the job went to three of the toughest Municipal Court judges in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the county, prostitutes and their customers rarely are sentenced to jail on a first offense. The usual penalty is a $150 fine. In Hollywood, however, the norm for first-time prostitute convictions became a five-day sentence and three days in jail for their customers. The judges--ex-cop Harold N.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The mandate from the community was to clean up the streets of Hollywood, and the job went to three of the toughest Municipal Court judges in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the county, prostitutes and their customers rarely are sentenced to jail on a first offense. The usual penalty is a $150 fine. In Hollywood, however, the norm for first-time prostitute convictions became a five-day sentence and three days in jail for their customers. The judges--ex-cop Harold N.
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NEWS
April 10, 1986
Three Municipal Court judges will begin hearing cases on Monday in the recently completed Hollywood Courthouse in the 5900 block of Hollywood Boulevard. Judges Harold N. Crowder, Sandy R. Kriegler and Michael Nash have been assigned to the court. Crowder has been appointed supervising judge. The two-story courthouse, which cost $6.6 million and took five years to build, contains three courtrooms, several offices and an attached two-level, 135-car parking structure.
NEWS
March 17, 1985
Harold N. Crowder, a Los Angeles Judicial District court commissioner, has been appointed a municipal judge by Gov. George Deukmejian. Crowder, 59, of La Canada, replaces Judge Nancy Brown, who was elevated to the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Crowder has been a court commissioner since 1974. He was previously in private practice and served as a police officer and later as a detective for the Los Angeles Police Department. Municipal Court judges are paid $66,449 annually.
NEWS
January 29, 1987
Max Herman, head of the Los Angeles Police Department's colorful and unusual old "Hat Squad" of detectives that filled hundreds of jail cells during its colorful reign, died Monday. He was 65 and recently had undergone heart bypass surgery. Herman, who lived in La Canada Flintridge, joined the department in 1946 and retired in 1963 to practice law. In the intervening years he and Edward F. Benson, Clarence A. (Red) Stromwall and Harold N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992 | JAMES QUINN
A 50-year-old North Hills man with 12 previous drunk driving convictions was sentenced Wednesday to one year in jail for repeatedly ramming his car into a parked vehicle and then fleeing the scene. The sentence was the maximum that could have been handed out to Harry W. Peck, who has 17 prior driving-related convictions, Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn said. Van Nuys Municipal Judge Harold N.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | JACK HAWN
Word went through the underworld that they were tough. No question about it. They were intimidating just by their appearance. The hat was their trademark. --Lt. Dan Cooke, Los Angeles Police Department It was slightly past noon, a typical working day almost three decades ago. A nondescript sedan pulled alongside a curb and parked on Hope Street in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | PAUL FELDMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At a skyrocketing pace unmatched anywhere in the nation, tens of thousands of inmates are literally walking out the back doors of Los Angeles County's overcrowded jails after serving little or none of their sentences behind bars. Worse yet, thousands of criminals--as many as one in four, according to a survey undertaken by The Times and the city attorney's office--commit new offenses within months of their early releases.
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