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Harold Pee Wee Reese

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August 19, 1999
Hall of Fame Plaque Inscription on the Hall of Fame plaque of Harold Henry "Pee Wee" Reese: Pee Wee Reese was the captain of the great Dodger teams of the 1940s and 1950s. His subtle leadership, competitive fire and professional pride complemented his dependable glove at shortstop, reliable baserunning and clutch-hitting as significant factors in seven Dodger pennants. As much as anyone, he was instrumental in easing the acceptance of Jackie Robinson as baseball's first black ballplayer.
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August 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Brooklyn Dodger teammates attending Pee Wee Reese's funeral Wednesday remembered the Hall of Fame shortstop as a man among the "Boys of Summer." "He was the tradition, he was the greatest Dodger of them all," center fielder Duke Snider said. Snider recalled a trip to Hawaii with Reese and Don Zimmer to attend the baseball winter meetings. "They had a big chair there that was called the 'Kahuna chair,' " he said. "Zimmer said to him, 'Captain, that's your chair.'
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SPORTS
August 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Brooklyn Dodger teammates attending Pee Wee Reese's funeral Wednesday remembered the Hall of Fame shortstop as a man among the "Boys of Summer." "He was the tradition, he was the greatest Dodger of them all," center fielder Duke Snider said. Snider recalled a trip to Hawaii with Reese and Don Zimmer to attend the baseball winter meetings. "They had a big chair there that was called the 'Kahuna chair,' " he said. "Zimmer said to him, 'Captain, that's your chair.'
SPORTS
August 19, 1999
Hall of Fame Plaque Inscription on the Hall of Fame plaque of Harold Henry "Pee Wee" Reese: Pee Wee Reese was the captain of the great Dodger teams of the 1940s and 1950s. His subtle leadership, competitive fire and professional pride complemented his dependable glove at shortstop, reliable baserunning and clutch-hitting as significant factors in seven Dodger pennants. As much as anyone, he was instrumental in easing the acceptance of Jackie Robinson as baseball's first black ballplayer.
SPORTS
August 19, 1999 | ROGER KAHN
Here are some lines from "The Boys of Summer" that I composed after a visit with Pee Wee Reese in 1970. For many years he had been team captain of the Brooklyn Dodgers. We talked on a screened-in porch and watched sunlight fall upon a garden. [Able-bodied Seaman] Pee Wee Reese was riding a ship back from Guam when he heard the wrenching news that Branch Rickey had hired a black.
SPORTS
August 15, 1999 | JON THURBER and JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pee Wee Reese, the slick-fielding shortstop of the legendary Dodger teams of the 1940s and '50s who played a vital role in the team's acceptance of Jackie Robinson as baseball's first black player, died Saturday at his home in Louisville, Ky. He was 81. The cause of death was not announced by the Dodgers, who reported Reese's passing only hours before the team took the field against the Atlanta Braves. It was known, however, that Reese had battled cancer in recent years.
SPORTS
August 19, 1999 | ROGER KAHN, This occassional contributor to The Times is the author of "Boys of Summer," "Joe & Marilyn," and other baseball books
We were working on a film, Pee Wee Reese, his son Mark and myself, five years ago, and we were trying to get one memorable story right. The film was a one-hour documentary on the old Dodger captain and shortstop, which Mark had titled, "The Quiet Ambassador." The story we sought recounted a single brief, moving deed. But it had been told and retold and mistold so many times, we had a hard time reconstructing the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2005 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
A trenchant pulse fuels "National Pastime" in its California premiere at the Fremont Centre Theatre. Though slow to warm up, Bryan Harnetiaux's populist account of how Brooklyn Dodgers president Branch Rickey saw the historic potential in Jackie Robinson builds to involving levels. Diehard fan Harnetiaux initially trades data for dramatic form. He opens with African American columnist Wendell Smith (Ted Lange) and legendary announcer Red Barber (Vaughn Armstrong).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK
California Angels management recently decided to erect a six-foot-high chain-link fence to keep fans away from players who, after games, have to make their way from the stadium to the parking lot. The new fence runs from the stadium near Gate 7 to another fenced-off area where players park their automobiles.
SPORTS
August 19, 1999 | ROGER KAHN
Here are some lines from "The Boys of Summer" that I composed after a visit with Pee Wee Reese in 1970. For many years he had been team captain of the Brooklyn Dodgers. We talked on a screened-in porch and watched sunlight fall upon a garden. [Able-bodied Seaman] Pee Wee Reese was riding a ship back from Guam when he heard the wrenching news that Branch Rickey had hired a black.
SPORTS
August 19, 1999 | ROGER KAHN, This occassional contributor to The Times is the author of "Boys of Summer," "Joe & Marilyn," and other baseball books
We were working on a film, Pee Wee Reese, his son Mark and myself, five years ago, and we were trying to get one memorable story right. The film was a one-hour documentary on the old Dodger captain and shortstop, which Mark had titled, "The Quiet Ambassador." The story we sought recounted a single brief, moving deed. But it had been told and retold and mistold so many times, we had a hard time reconstructing the scene.
SPORTS
August 15, 1999 | JON THURBER and JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pee Wee Reese, the slick-fielding shortstop of the legendary Dodger teams of the 1940s and '50s who played a vital role in the team's acceptance of Jackie Robinson as baseball's first black player, died Saturday at his home in Louisville, Ky. He was 81. The cause of death was not announced by the Dodgers, who reported Reese's passing only hours before the team took the field against the Atlanta Braves. It was known, however, that Reese had battled cancer in recent years.
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