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Harold Rosen

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NEWS
March 5, 1997 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they've already changed the world, what are two brothers supposed to do as retirement looms? For Ben and Harold Rosen, the answer is to try to do it again. The Louisiana-bred, Caltech-educated Rosens have embarked on their biggest challenge ever--to produce a clean, efficient and powerful automotive power source that will do nothing less than replace the internal combustion engine. If that sounds familiar, it is. There have been countless schemes to rid the world of the noxious power plant.
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NEWS
March 5, 1997 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they've already changed the world, what are two brothers supposed to do as retirement looms? For Ben and Harold Rosen, the answer is to try to do it again. The Louisiana-bred, Caltech-educated Rosens have embarked on their biggest challenge ever--to produce a clean, efficient and powerful automotive power source that will do nothing less than replace the internal combustion engine. If that sounds familiar, it is. There have been countless schemes to rid the world of the noxious power plant.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After spending nearly 5 years and $24 million to develop an engine technology that it promised would revolutionize the auto industry, Rosen Motors will close its doors on Friday because it couldn't persuade any major car manufacturers to buy into its vision. Launched in 1993 by Harold Rosen, a renowned aerospace engineer, and his brother Ben, a legendary venture capitalist and chairman of Compaq Computer Corp., Rosen Motors aimed to develop a turbine-flywheel powertrain for passenger cars.
NEWS
September 1, 1985 | JOHN BARBOUR, Associated Press
Up there, in the realm of eerie silence that used to exceed man's grasp, little manufacturers circle the Earth steadily. The world would be sorely deprived if they went on strike.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Rosen, a vice president at Hughes Aircraft Co., has vivid memories of the first time a satellite was used for commercial television broadcasting. It was 1964, the event was the Tokyo Olympics, and he was helping set up the satellite Earth station at Point Mugu. "We received it with this giant installation," he recalled. "The dish was 85 feet in diameter . . . it cost millions."
BUSINESS
August 5, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Sunil Shrestha knows all about inventory and cash flow from his years operating Dairy Queen and IHOP franchises. But nothing in his entrepreneurial career prepared him for his current challenges. What do you do when a South African supplier can't deliver on time because the only woman who knows how to make its intricately beaded baskets has died? What is a reasonable price to pay poor Indonesians who are weaving bags out of recycled garbage?
BUSINESS
March 17, 1997
Today is the one-year anniversary of The Cutting Edge. To mark the occasion, we invited a small group of technology industry leaders to a round-table luncheon on the future of high technology in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Robinson Pierce, a multifaceted electrical engineer with a flair for words, has died. He was 92. Pierce, who spent the past two years in an assisted-living facility in Sunnyvale, Calif., died Tuesday in a Mountain View hospital of pneumonia. Pierce named the ubiquitous transistor, fathered the communications satellite, and became an expert on computer music and musical acoustics--and wrote about all of it, sometimes in entertaining science fiction format.
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