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Harold Stassen

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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
For the 10th time, Republican Harold Stassen is running for President, not so much to win as to make sure that the next person who does talks about important issues during the campaign. To many, Stassen's name is synonymous with losing, but the 84-year-old former Minnesota governor said he does not see it that way. "I feel it's really been a winning life," he said Wednesday after he filed papers to run in New Hampshire's Feb. 18 primary.
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NEWS
March 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds turned out in West St. Paul to say goodbye to former Minnesota Gov. Harold E. Stassen, a liberal Republican who also ran for president nine times. Stassen, who had been the last surviving signer of the U.N. charter, died March 4 at the age of 93. "He was a very great man, but also he was a humble, loyal, faithful servant," another former Minnesota governor, Elmer L. Andersen, who served from 1961 to 1963, said during the service at Riverview Baptist Church.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former Minnesota Gov. Harold E. Stassen, the onetime "boy wonder" of Republican politics who became a perennial unsuccessful aspirant for his party's presidential nomination, died Sunday. He was 93. Stassen died in the Bloomington, Minn., retirement community where he had lived for the last few years, said his granddaughter, Rachel Stassen-Berger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former Minnesota Gov. Harold E. Stassen, the onetime "boy wonder" of Republican politics who became a perennial unsuccessful aspirant for his party's presidential nomination, died Sunday. He was 93. Stassen died in the Bloomington, Minn., retirement community where he had lived for the last few years, said his granddaughter, Rachel Stassen-Berger.
OPINION
August 29, 1999 | CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, Charles Krauthammer is a syndicated columnist in Washington
Pat Buchanan may have come in a distant fifth in the Iowa straw poll, lost the mantle of leader of the religious right to Gary Bauer and generally crashed and burned his quest for the Republican presidential nomination. But he remains the most interesting candidate in the presidential field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1996
What a shame! This could have been the year Harold Stassen would finally be the Republican presidential nominee. JORDAN AUSTIN Granada Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1985
I do hope that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) does not run for the presidency in 1988. I'm afraid he is becoming the Harold Stassen of the Democratic Party. VIRGINIA DARE LUDWIG Tustin
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Harold Stassen, 87, the 10-time presidential candidate whose name has become synonymous with unsuccessful campaigns, has joined the Republican race for the U.S. Senate. Stassen, a former Minnesota governor, announced Friday that he is seeking his party's nomination for the seat held by retiring Republican Sen. Dave Durenberger.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Harold Stassen, a symbol of political persistence, on Wednesday launched his 10th run for the presidency. To many, Stassen's name is synonymous with losing, but the 84-year-old former Minnesota governor and university president said he does not see it that way. "I feel it's really been a winning life," he said Wednesday after he filed papers to run in New Hampshire's Feb. 18 primary. "Every one of the nine times there has been some solid result."
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Harold Stassen, boy wonder of the Republican Party 49 years ago, launched his eighth campaign for the White House on Tuesday. He said that he hopes to force discussion of the issues. Winning is "not the primary concern," he said. "My primary concern is to move America." Stassen, 80, waged only token campaigns in recent election years, but he told reporters: "I'll try to win. I'll do the best I can."
OPINION
August 29, 1999 | CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, Charles Krauthammer is a syndicated columnist in Washington
Pat Buchanan may have come in a distant fifth in the Iowa straw poll, lost the mantle of leader of the religious right to Gary Bauer and generally crashed and burned his quest for the Republican presidential nomination. But he remains the most interesting candidate in the presidential field.
NEWS
August 13, 1996
The California delegation is definitely up front at this convention. Seated directly in front of the podium is Kansas (no surprise, given native son Bob Dole), but stage right is California and its 165 delegate seats. That makes the delegation a handy attraction for the hundreds of television cameras around San Diego's convention hall. CNN's Gene Randall says that California's delegates are "certainly going to be one of the focal points of the convention."
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | From Reuters
Harold Stassen, the frequent Republican presidential candidate who is now 89 but once was known as the "boy governor" of Minnesota, is throwing his hat into the ring once again--this time as a possible running mate for Bob Dole. Stassen said he was "tired of this negative talk" about people not wanting to run with the Republican presidential challenger and thought he would offer a positive tone by offering himself as a choice for Dole's ticket-mate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1996
What a shame! This could have been the year Harold Stassen would finally be the Republican presidential nominee. JORDAN AUSTIN Granada Hills
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Harold Stassen, 87, the 10-time presidential candidate whose name has become synonymous with unsuccessful campaigns, has joined the Republican race for the U.S. Senate. Stassen, a former Minnesota governor, announced Friday that he is seeking his party's nomination for the seat held by retiring Republican Sen. Dave Durenberger.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Harold Stassen, a symbol of political persistence, on Wednesday launched his 10th run for the presidency. To many, Stassen's name is synonymous with losing, but the 84-year-old former Minnesota governor and university president said he does not see it that way. "I feel it's really been a winning life," he said Wednesday after he filed papers to run in New Hampshire's Feb. 18 primary. "Every one of the nine times there has been some solid result."
NEWS
August 13, 1996
The California delegation is definitely up front at this convention. Seated directly in front of the podium is Kansas (no surprise, given native son Bob Dole), but stage right is California and its 165 delegate seats. That makes the delegation a handy attraction for the hundreds of television cameras around San Diego's convention hall. CNN's Gene Randall says that California's delegates are "certainly going to be one of the focal points of the convention."
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds turned out in West St. Paul to say goodbye to former Minnesota Gov. Harold E. Stassen, a liberal Republican who also ran for president nine times. Stassen, who had been the last surviving signer of the U.N. charter, died March 4 at the age of 93. "He was a very great man, but also he was a humble, loyal, faithful servant," another former Minnesota governor, Elmer L. Andersen, who served from 1961 to 1963, said during the service at Riverview Baptist Church.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
For the 10th time, Republican Harold Stassen is running for President, not so much to win as to make sure that the next person who does talks about important issues during the campaign. To many, Stassen's name is synonymous with losing, but the 84-year-old former Minnesota governor said he does not see it that way. "I feel it's really been a winning life," he said Wednesday after he filed papers to run in New Hampshire's Feb. 18 primary.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Harold Stassen, boy wonder of the Republican Party 49 years ago, launched his eighth campaign for the White House on Tuesday. He said that he hopes to force discussion of the issues. Winning is "not the primary concern," he said. "My primary concern is to move America." Stassen, 80, waged only token campaigns in recent election years, but he told reporters: "I'll try to win. I'll do the best I can."
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