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Harold Washington Party

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October 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens halted printing and distribution of ballots for the Nov. 6 elections in Cook County, saying the full court should hear a dispute over third-party candidates. The ballots did not have the names of candidates from the Harold Washington Party, named for the city's late black mayor and representing some blacks disenchanted with the Democratic Party.
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NEWS
October 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens halted printing and distribution of ballots for the Nov. 6 elections in Cook County, saying the full court should hear a dispute over third-party candidates. The ballots did not have the names of candidates from the Harold Washington Party, named for the city's late black mayor and representing some blacks disenchanted with the Democratic Party.
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NEWS
October 20, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Washington died almost three years ago, but in the raucous world of Chicago politics his name--if not, perhaps, his spirit--lives on in the form of a now-you-see-it-now-you-don't political party that could cause major problems for Chicago Democrats. The all-black Harold Washington Party, named after the city's first black mayor, was formed last year by Alderman Timothy C. Evans, a Washington protege who waged an unsuccessful mayoral campaign as an independent.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Washington died almost three years ago, but in the raucous world of Chicago politics his name--if not, perhaps, his spirit--lives on in the form of a now-you-see-it-now-you-don't political party that could cause major problems for Chicago Democrats. The all-black Harold Washington Party, named after the city's first black mayor, was formed last year by Alderman Timothy C. Evans, a Washington protege who waged an unsuccessful mayoral campaign as an independent.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court restored an all-black political party to Cook County ballots Thursday pending a hearing on whether the party was improperly removed by the state Supreme Court. The decision sent election officials scrambling to reprint ballots in time for the Nov. 6 election. It also stirred Democratic fears that the Harold Washington Party, should it remain on the ballot, might improve the chances of Republican victories in a number of close races, including the governorship.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | United Press International
Mayor Richard M. Daley swept to reelection Tuesday amid record-low voter turnout, winning his first full term in the office his father held longer than any other mayor. In an unofficial count of 991 of the city's 2,912 precincts, Daley had 151,401 votes to 46,337 for Harold Washington Party candidate R. Eugene Pincham and 8,185 for Republican George Gottlieb. The easy victory is expected to pave the way for Daley to take a more vocal leadership role in the city's Administration.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | DAVID S. BRODER, THE WASHINGTON POST
The word disrespect is heard a lot these days in this city's black neighborhoods and it spells potentially big trouble for the Democrats. Because Democratic state Atty. Gen. Neil F. Hartigan showed "disrespect" for the late Harold Washington, Chicago's first black mayor, by supporting a rival Irish politician running on a third-party ticket in 1987, many of Washington's key supporters are calling for Hartigan's defeat in this year's gubernatorial race.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
Although the primary is still two months away, the contest among Chicago's battling Democrats for the party's mayoral nomination tightened Thursday with the withdrawal of one of the two leading black candidates. Winning the Democratic nomination has been tantamount to election for much of the 20th Century. Timothy C.
NEWS
November 6, 1990
Voters today will elect 35 senators, 36 governors, and 435 members of the House of Representatives. At stake will be the 55-45 balance in favor of the Democrats in the Senate, and control of statehouses, where redistricting following the 1990 census will affect political power for the next decade. Here's a look at some of the races that both parties are watching most closely, in addition to the battle for the California governorship--the richest prize on today's ballot.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
Richard M. Daley easily won election as mayor Tuesday, reclaiming the seat his father held for 21 years and putting to an end the six-year period of black leadership at City Hall. The vote was overwhelmingly split along racial lines, yet the campaign was largely free of the ugly racial appeals that have marred Chicago elections in the recent past. Daley indicated Tuesday, as he has throughout the campaign, that he intends to reach out to blacks as well as whites when he takes office.
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON, Times Staff Writer
More than 20 years have passed since Mayor Richard J. Daley gave police the infamous "shoot to kill" order after rioting erupted in the city's poorest neighborhoods, and 13 years have passed since the legendary mayor died. But attend a political rally on Chicago's South Side or listen to current black political leaders speak, and you would think those turbulent times had never faded. In the campaign for Tuesday's mayoral election, the ghost of Richard J.
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