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Harold Waterhouse

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1987
If Jeane Kirkpatrick wants us to declare war on Nicaragua and wipe it out, why doesn't she say so? Why all the pussyfooting? HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
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OPINION
May 28, 2003
Your "Nuclear Age Amnesia" editorial (May 25) calls for Americans to save ourselves from the terrible kind of death suffered by the people of Hiroshima when hit by a nuclear weapon. For this we need to get every nation in the world to verifiably destroy every single one of their nuclear weapons. Their destruction would have to be confirmed by inspectors from a trustworthy international organization. How can we bring this about? By sending every nation's rulers -- and their people -- photos of Hiroshima's horribly mangled bodies.
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MAGAZINE
September 11, 1988
Now, thanks to thousands across the nation, to honest scientists like Roy Woodruff and to Robert Scheer, "Star Wars" is losing its lure. We may reverse the weapons race after all. HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
OPINION
November 14, 1999
"We knew . . . [the communist] system wasn't working," Mikhail Gorbachev says in an interview in Commentary (Nov. 9). But he implies that the capitalist system also has defects, especially when it is for "getting rid of the ABM treaty and for building a missile defense." He blames this on the "military-industrial complex." President Eisenhower also warned us about the military-industrial complex. But we keep letting its lobbyists talk Congress out of paying our dues to the U.N. and into spending our money on nuclear weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1990
I wish George Will ("Stampede to Democracy Ends Romance of Socialism," Op-Ed Page, Feb. 28) would turn his writing skills toward the romance of non-competitive socialism in the U.S.--by which I mean Reagan-Bush-type socialism for the rich. HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989
Q: When a President is under fire for endorsing anti-democratic violence in one country--China--how can he turn off the heat? A: By sending troops to another country--Panama--to engage in pro-democratic violence. HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988
Bravo for your editorial and for the light it shined into "the hole the nuclear nations have dug themselves (ourselves) into." By pointing to the illogic of both the Administration's and Nunn's positions, you show how deep that hole is. And, by implication, you show how tough we voters will have to be in the November election. To those asking for our votes we must say, in your words, "Get out of the habit of thinking of nuclear weapons as the only way to keep the global peace." HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1988
The plain-spokenness of your editorial should prod a lot of readers into thoughtful applause. If not, I'll consider the future Star Wars catastrophe as stemming from the present Star Wars catastrophe. What do I mean? This: that a society may be over the brink that can be bamboozled into a scheme so lacking the support of--and so scorned by--the independent scientists whose judgment we can trust. The one thing that might save us could be a surge of voter disgust that kicks the Star Wars con men out. And that is my prayer.
NEWS
April 13, 1989
The Los Angeles City Council's Planning Committee will consider a motion to limit multiresidential housing heights citywide to 35 feet on May 11, Councilman Marvin Braude said. Harold Waterhouse of Pacific Palisades organized a community campaign in support of stricter height limits last year after a 71-foot condominium was build on Sunset Boulevard near his home on Wildomar Street. Waterhouse received a Golden Sparkplug award from the Palisades community council for his efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
Gore is as concerned as Postrel with alleviating misery and the natural burdens of life, and his concern is reasoned and long-range. Gore not only cares deeply about people today but about tomorrow's people. Postrel mistakes Gore for the Earth Firsters with whom he disagrees--those whom he accuses of "advocating a kind of war on the human race as a means of protecting the planet." Al Gore's "Earth in the Balance" is more than just a wake-up call. It is a compilation of facts that, as Gore says, "indicate to me that the global environmental crisis is, as we say in Tennessee, as real as rain, and that the idea of leaving my children with a degraded Earth and a diminished future is unbearable."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
Gore is as concerned as Postrel with alleviating misery and the natural burdens of life, and his concern is reasoned and long-range. Gore not only cares deeply about people today but about tomorrow's people. Postrel mistakes Gore for the Earth Firsters with whom he disagrees--those whom he accuses of "advocating a kind of war on the human race as a means of protecting the planet." Al Gore's "Earth in the Balance" is more than just a wake-up call. It is a compilation of facts that, as Gore says, "indicate to me that the global environmental crisis is, as we say in Tennessee, as real as rain, and that the idea of leaving my children with a degraded Earth and a diminished future is unbearable."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1990
I wish George Will ("Stampede to Democracy Ends Romance of Socialism," Op-Ed Page, Feb. 28) would turn his writing skills toward the romance of non-competitive socialism in the U.S.--by which I mean Reagan-Bush-type socialism for the rich. HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989
Q: When a President is under fire for endorsing anti-democratic violence in one country--China--how can he turn off the heat? A: By sending troops to another country--Panama--to engage in pro-democratic violence. HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
NEWS
April 13, 1989
The Los Angeles City Council's Planning Committee will consider a motion to limit multiresidential housing heights citywide to 35 feet on May 11, Councilman Marvin Braude said. Harold Waterhouse of Pacific Palisades organized a community campaign in support of stricter height limits last year after a 71-foot condominium was build on Sunset Boulevard near his home on Wildomar Street. Waterhouse received a Golden Sparkplug award from the Palisades community council for his efforts.
MAGAZINE
September 11, 1988
Now, thanks to thousands across the nation, to honest scientists like Roy Woodruff and to Robert Scheer, "Star Wars" is losing its lure. We may reverse the weapons race after all. HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1988
The plain-spokenness of your editorial should prod a lot of readers into thoughtful applause. If not, I'll consider the future Star Wars catastrophe as stemming from the present Star Wars catastrophe. What do I mean? This: that a society may be over the brink that can be bamboozled into a scheme so lacking the support of--and so scorned by--the independent scientists whose judgment we can trust. The one thing that might save us could be a surge of voter disgust that kicks the Star Wars con men out. And that is my prayer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1985
Norman Podhoretz attacking Bruce Springsteen (Editorial Pages, Aug. 29) is like a coyote yapping at an American elk. But Podhoretz does remind us that his hero, Ronald Reagan, has politically hailed Springsteen's songs as bringing "a message of hope" for the American future. I say Reagan accidentally spoke the truth. The message of hope is: 1--That Springsteen is rebelling against the callousness of the Reagan kind of flag-waving. 2--That his rebellion is selling enormously well at all ticket agencies and record stores--the best opinion polls in the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1987
The Weiss article could only come from someone who is 1--a developer, 2--a comedian--or both. Your footnote "Weiss is a partner in Dixco, a residential development firm," says number 1. Weiss' last paragraph says comedian. If we don't buy his Dixco development gospel, he says, "We will end up with what we deserve: low-traffic volume, clean air and plenty of water"--and with "a lot of Southern Californians living somewhere else." (Laughter and applause.) The fact is that this hell for developers is heaven for most of us--even at the awful risk that developers will stop fattening our elected officials' campaign funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988
Bravo for your editorial and for the light it shined into "the hole the nuclear nations have dug themselves (ourselves) into." By pointing to the illogic of both the Administration's and Nunn's positions, you show how deep that hole is. And, by implication, you show how tough we voters will have to be in the November election. To those asking for our votes we must say, in your words, "Get out of the habit of thinking of nuclear weapons as the only way to keep the global peace." HAROLD WATERHOUSE Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1987
The Weiss article could only come from someone who is 1--a developer, 2--a comedian--or both. Your footnote "Weiss is a partner in Dixco, a residential development firm," says number 1. Weiss' last paragraph says comedian. If we don't buy his Dixco development gospel, he says, "We will end up with what we deserve: low-traffic volume, clean air and plenty of water"--and with "a lot of Southern Californians living somewhere else." (Laughter and applause.) The fact is that this hell for developers is heaven for most of us--even at the awful risk that developers will stop fattening our elected officials' campaign funds.
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