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Harolds Club

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NEWS
March 24, 1985 | United Press International
To a fast-buck carnival man like Raymond I. (Pappy) Smith, it was like the ring of a silver dollar when Nevada legalized gambling back in the 1930s. He didn't know much about casino games, but he figured he couldn't go wrong by sending his sons to Reno to set up shop with a couple of nickel slot machines and a penny roulette game. It was 50 years ago this month that Harold Smith Sr. and Raymond I. Smith opened Harolds Club, Nevada's oldest casino.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Harolds Club and the Nevada Club, two of downtown Reno's oldest casinos, are for sale after tight money thwarted plans to add hotel rooms to Harolds, according to its owners. Phil Griffith, president of the Fitzgeralds Group, said the group, which owns both clubs, has retained the investment firm of Bear, Stearns & Co. to make the sale offering. No sales price was given.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Harold S. Smith, whose father named a gambling club for him and then watched with amazement as migrants moving west adorned their Model A autos with his "Harolds Club or Bust" slogan, has died at the age of 75, it was announced Wednesday. His attorney, Jack Streeter, said the colorful former owner of what once was Reno's largest casino, died at his home in Reno on Monday of what was described as natural causes.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Harolds Club and the Nevada Club, two of downtown Reno's oldest casinos, are for sale after tight money thwarted plans to add hotel rooms to Harolds, according to its owners. Phil Griffith, president of the Fitzgeralds Group, said the group, which owns both clubs, has retained the investment firm of Bear, Stearns & Co. to make the sale offering. No sales price was given.
NEWS
June 3, 1986 | United Press International
A divided Supreme Court ruled today that confessions by accomplices are so unreliable they cannot be used as key proof of another's guilt. The justices, on a 5-4 vote, reversed the Appellate Court of Illinois, which had held that a convicted murderer's rights were not violated by a judge's consideration of a co-defendant's confession. The ruling came in the case of Millie Lee, who was convicted along with her boyfriend, Edwin Thomas, of murdering two women in East St. Louis, Ill., in 1982.
HOME & GARDEN
October 2, 1999 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Death has always been a part of everyday life. In Victorian times, many children died before they were 10, women died in childbirth, and epidemics such as smallpox often killed several members of the same family. The cemetery was a place to "talk" to the deceased while honoring them with flowers. Family outings, and often picnics, were commonplace in large, park-like cemeteries. Victorian memorials to the dead included elaborate tombstones, carved statues, cast-iron fences, gates and furniture.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The neon promise still stretches across Virginia Street: "The Biggest Little City in the World." These days, though, that bright arc is anchored at the corner of a boarded-up casino called Harolds. Next to Harolds is a boarded-up casino called the Nevada Club. Nearby is a boarded-up hotel called the Virginian. The historic Mapes Hotel--at 12 stories, once the tallest building in the Silver State--has stood empty since 1982.
NEWS
February 27, 1985 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
Doug Coots wanted to win a jackpot. He wasn't greedy about it. All he asked, the 46-year-old Sacramento carpenter would recall, was to "take off a small jackpot." On April 10, 1982, Coots went to Harolds Club, a casino in the glitzy neon gulch of Reno's Virginia Street. He went to a certain slot machine that certain people had strongly recommended that he play, and he started to pump in quarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Harold S. Smith, whose father named a gambling club for him and then watched with amazement as migrants moving west adorned their Model A autos with his "Harolds Club or Bust" slogan, has died at the age of 75, it was announced Wednesday. His attorney, Jack Streeter, said the colorful former owner of what once was Reno's largest casino, died at his home in Reno on Monday of what was described as natural causes.
NEWS
March 24, 1985 | United Press International
To a fast-buck carnival man like Raymond I. (Pappy) Smith, it was like the ring of a silver dollar when Nevada legalized gambling back in the 1930s. He didn't know much about casino games, but he figured he couldn't go wrong by sending his sons to Reno to set up shop with a couple of nickel slot machines and a penny roulette game. It was 50 years ago this month that Harold Smith Sr. and Raymond I. Smith opened Harolds Club, Nevada's oldest casino.
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