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Haroon Rashid Aswat

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WORLD
August 4, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella and Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writers
Zambia will extradite to Britain an alleged Al Qaeda operative suspected of having links to the bombers who struck London last month and of attempting to start a terrorist training camp in the U.S., officials said Wednesday. Zambian President Levy Mwanawasa told reporters in the capital, Lusaka, that after discussions with British and U.S. officials, his nation had agreed to hand Haroon Rashid Aswat over to British authorities.
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WORLD
August 4, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella and Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writers
Zambia will extradite to Britain an alleged Al Qaeda operative suspected of having links to the bombers who struck London last month and of attempting to start a terrorist training camp in the U.S., officials said Wednesday. Zambian President Levy Mwanawasa told reporters in the capital, Lusaka, that after discussions with British and U.S. officials, his nation had agreed to hand Haroon Rashid Aswat over to British authorities.
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WORLD
July 28, 2005 | Richard Serrano, Sebastian Rotella and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Zambian authorities have detained a man sought in connection with this month's deadly London bombings and for his alleged role in setting up a terrorist training camp in Oregon, U.S. officials said Wednesday. Haroon Rashid Aswat, 30, a British citizen of Indian descent, piqued the interest of investigators when they discovered that about 20 calls had been placed from his cellphone to some of the four men who set off bombs on London's transit system July 7, killing 52 people and themselves.
WORLD
July 28, 2005 | Richard Serrano, Sebastian Rotella and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Zambian authorities have detained a man sought in connection with this month's deadly London bombings and for his alleged role in setting up a terrorist training camp in Oregon, U.S. officials said Wednesday. Haroon Rashid Aswat, 30, a British citizen of Indian descent, piqued the interest of investigators when they discovered that about 20 calls had been placed from his cellphone to some of the four men who set off bombs on London's transit system July 7, killing 52 people and themselves.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2005 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Oussama Kassir, a Lebanese-born Swedish man, has been charged with taking part in a 1999 plot to establish a terrorist training camp in rural Oregon, federal authorities said Tuesday. The camp was never set up. Kassir, 39, was arrested Sunday in Prague, Czech Republic, where he was being detained as U.S. officials sought his extradition.
WORLD
January 6, 2006 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
A British man accused of playing a role in a 1999 plan to establish a terrorist training camp in Bly, Ore., may be extradited to the United States, a judge ruled Thursday. Magistrate's Court Judge Timothy Workman rejected arguments raised by attorneys for Haroon Rashid Aswat that the U.S. might declare the suspect an "enemy combatant" and send him to its prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to face a military tribunal. Aswat's lawyers said they would immediately appeal the ruling to the High Court.
WORLD
August 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
Zambia extradited a suspected Islamic militant to Britain on Sunday, and he was immediately arrested on a U.S. warrant accusing him of conspiring to organize a training camp in Oregon to prepare fighters for Afghanistan, police said. Haroon Rashid Aswat, a British citizen of Indian descent, was arrested as British prosecutors said they would consider treason charges against any Islamic extremist who expresses support for terrorism. The U.S.
WORLD
August 9, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writers
Four top suspects in the attempted attacks on the London transit system July 21, including a previously unidentified man linked to a knapsack bomb found in a park, pleaded not guilty Monday in an appearance at a high-security court. Also in court was an alleged Al Qaeda operative extradited a day earlier from Zambia, where he had been questioned by British counter-terrorism agents about the July 7 bombings. Those attacks killed 52 people and the four bombers.
WORLD
July 22, 2005 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure to deliver on promises to root out Islamic militants, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf sought in a speech Thursday to shift some of the blame to Britain and the United States. In an address televised nationwide, Musharraf said Pakistan faced "a very critical situation" amid allegations of its link to the July 7 bombings in London. But, he added, those attacks showed that Britain must confront problems within its own borders.
WORLD
August 19, 2006 | Paul Watson and Mubashir Zaidi, Special to The Times
Officials investigating the alleged plot to blow up transatlantic airliners say at least seven of the suspects arrested in Britain had dual citizenship and made frequent trips here in the last three years, gaining information on how to make detonators and explosives. Most of the suspects detained in Britain also had met with Rashid Rauf, 25, whom Pakistani authorities arrested two days before the alleged cell was broken up on Aug. 10, a senior Pakistani government source said.
WORLD
July 26, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella and Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writers
Police disclosed the names of two fugitives Monday who are wanted on suspicion of trying to bomb a bus and subway train last week and stormed an apartment in a North London housing project where neighbors said they had frequently seen the two men. Scotland Yard's announcement indicated that police were making some progress as they raced to prevent further attacks in a city on edge, but they appealed again for the public's help in finding four would-be bombers who remained at large.
WORLD
July 31, 2005 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
They were two terrorist cells united by, if nothing else, the same target: the London transport system. By the time the first bombers reached their targets on the morning of July 7, three of them had traveled 200 miles. Exactly two weeks later, the second group struck just 200 yards from a ground-floor apartment where one suspect lived with his wife and three children. The two groups of young men were separated by more than miles.
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