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Harper Lee

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July 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Who would have predicted that, in her late 80s, Harper Lee would have to file suit to get the control of "To Kill a Mockingbird" returned to her? According to a lawsuit filed in May, Lee, in failing health, had been "duped" into assigning the copyright of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to her literary agent, a lawyer. That's no small thing: A half century after its publication, "To Kill a Mockingbird" still sells more than 750,000 copies a year. In one typical six-month period in 2009, its royalties amounted to more than $1.6 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Harper Lee, the author of the 1960 classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird," is suing a museum in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala., for what she claims is its improper use of her name and the novel's title. The author, who is seeking an injunction and damages, also claims that the museum has sought to block her trademark on the novel. The Monroe County Heritage Museum is a historic organization that manages six venues in the county. In documents filed earlier this month in federal court, Lee's lawyers say that the museum seeks to profit from the "unauthorized use of protected names and trademarks" of the author and the book's title.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Harper Lee, the author of the 1960 classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird," is suing a museum in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala., for what she claims is its improper use of her name and the novel's title. The author, who is seeking an injunction and damages, also claims that the museum has sought to block her trademark on the novel. The Monroe County Heritage Museum is a historic organization that manages six venues in the county. In documents filed earlier this month in federal court, Lee's lawyers say that the museum seeks to profit from the "unauthorized use of protected names and trademarks" of the author and the book's title.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Rich Nordwind
Every generation, it seems, has its own favorite coming-of-age movies. And though tastes change, as does the definition of "coming of age" - including everyone from preteens to young adults in their 20s - these five films are among the ones that have stood the test of time and inspired generations of filmgoers. "American Graffiti. " George Lucas' 1973 ode to cars and cruising set in a small California town in the 1960s. Its cinematic style defined a new kind of American naturalism, and its celebration of youthful aspirations - and dashed dreams - made a lasting impact.
OPINION
July 11, 2010 | By Kerry Madden
In her last in-depth interview about writing, Harper Lee talked about her hometown, Monroeville, Ala., in 1964, telling Roy Newquist: We simply entertained each other by talking. It's quite a thing, if you've never been in or known a small Southern town. The people are not particularly sophisticated, naturally. They're not worldly wise in any way. But they tell you a story whenever they see you. We're oral types — we talk. Sunday is the 50th anniversary of the publication of Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird," and Monroeville is still a place rich with stories and storytellers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Harper Lee, author of the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird," has written a rare published item -- a letter for Oprah Winfrey's magazine on how she became a reader as a child in a rural Alabama town. The 80-year-old Pulitzer Prize winner quit giving interviews about 40 years ago and, other than a 1983 review of an Alabama history book, has published nothing of significance in some four decades. That makes her article for O, the Oprah Magazine, something of a literary coup.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
They were Southern women who wrote novels about race, family and the destructive mores of their native land — so it makes sense that the "American Masters" documentaries about Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee would run back to back Monday night. It also makes sense that neither of these films would break the two-hour mark — "Margaret Mitchell: An American Rebel" is 55 minutes, "Harper Lee: Hey, Boo" is 90 minutes — because these women shared another characteristic: Each wrote just one book.
BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
HARPER LEE is the Greta Garbo of novelists. Since her last interview in March 1964, the 79-year-old author has been sighted mostly at the First Methodist Church in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala., or perhaps on East 82nd Street in Manhattan, where she lives for part of the year. Her only novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," however, needs no publicist or writer to keep it alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2005 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
In the old days, when armies of college grads would troop off to write the Great American Novel -- before everyone switched to screenplays -- there was something they didn't know: It had already been written. "To Kill a Mockingbird," published in 1960, won the Pulitzer Prize, and the huzzahs just kept coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Lewis Beale, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Harper Lee was working as an airline reservations agent in New York City, struggling to write a novel tentatively titled "Atticus," when a close friend gave her enough money to take time off and finish her book. Published in 1960 with an initial print run of just 5,000 copies, "To Kill a Mockingbird" became an instant phenomenon: a critically acclaimed bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winner, followed by a multiple-Oscar-winning 1962 film featuring the iconic performance of Gregory Peck as courageous Southern lawyer Atticus Finch.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Who would have predicted that, in her late 80s, Harper Lee would have to file suit to get the control of "To Kill a Mockingbird" returned to her? According to a lawsuit filed in May, Lee, in failing health, had been "duped" into assigning the copyright of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to her literary agent, a lawyer. That's no small thing: A half century after its publication, "To Kill a Mockingbird" still sells more than 750,000 copies a year. In one typical six-month period in 2009, its royalties amounted to more than $1.6 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
They were Southern women who wrote novels about race, family and the destructive mores of their native land — so it makes sense that the "American Masters" documentaries about Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee would run back to back Monday night. It also makes sense that neither of these films would break the two-hour mark — "Margaret Mitchell: An American Rebel" is 55 minutes, "Harper Lee: Hey, Boo" is 90 minutes — because these women shared another characteristic: Each wrote just one book.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Many books and films have partisans who insist their works are loved and admired by the American people, but "To Kill a Mockingbird" is the real thing. The Harper Lee novel, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, has sold nearly 50 million copies in the 50 years since its publication. And when the U.S. Postal Service recently issued a stamp honoring "Mockingbird" star Gregory Peck, it used a still from that Oscar-winning performance as its image. But what of Nelle Harper Lee, the young Southern writer from Monroeville, Ala., whose reaction to all this success, she said in a radio interview, was one of "sheer numbness, being hit over the head and knocked cold.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Lewis Beale, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Harper Lee was working as an airline reservations agent in New York City, struggling to write a novel tentatively titled "Atticus," when a close friend gave her enough money to take time off and finish her book. Published in 1960 with an initial print run of just 5,000 copies, "To Kill a Mockingbird" became an instant phenomenon: a critically acclaimed bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winner, followed by a multiple-Oscar-winning 1962 film featuring the iconic performance of Gregory Peck as courageous Southern lawyer Atticus Finch.
OPINION
July 11, 2010 | By Kerry Madden
In her last in-depth interview about writing, Harper Lee talked about her hometown, Monroeville, Ala., in 1964, telling Roy Newquist: We simply entertained each other by talking. It's quite a thing, if you've never been in or known a small Southern town. The people are not particularly sophisticated, naturally. They're not worldly wise in any way. But they tell you a story whenever they see you. We're oral types — we talk. Sunday is the 50th anniversary of the publication of Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird," and Monroeville is still a place rich with stories and storytellers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Scout, Atticus and Boo A Celebration of Fifty Years of 'To Kill A Mockingbird' Mary McDonagh Murphy Harper: 240 pp., $24.99 What is it about "To Kill a Mockingbird"? Harper Lee's 1960 debut has sold 30 million copies, more than any other 20th century novel, and it continues to sell 1 million more each year. Yet despite having won the Pulitzer Prize and having assumed a place as one of our essential national books of fiction, it remains its author's only published novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Scout, Atticus and Boo A Celebration of Fifty Years of 'To Kill A Mockingbird' Mary McDonagh Murphy Harper: 240 pp., $24.99 What is it about "To Kill a Mockingbird"? Harper Lee's 1960 debut has sold 30 million copies, more than any other 20th century novel, and it continues to sell 1 million more each year. Yet despite having won the Pulitzer Prize and having assumed a place as one of our essential national books of fiction, it remains its author's only published novel.
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