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Harper Lee

ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Sundance Channel's "Rectify" is the first and possibly only television show one can imagine Flannery O'Connor blogging about. It isn't just good TV, it's revelatory TV. The genre's biggest potential game changer since AMC debuted the one-two punch of "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad. " "Television can do that?" we asked in wonder as Don Draper squinted in cultural allegory over his Scotch on the rocks. Yes it can, and now, thanks to creator Ray McKinnon and the cast of "Rectify," television can also immerse the viewer in a gloriously rich and careful study of how endurance and faith, strength and surrender, fear and serenity balance to form the essential nature of humanity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
'American Masters' Where: KOCE When: Margaret Mitchell: 9 p.m.; Harper Lee: 10 p.m. Monday Rating: TV-PG-L (may be unsuitable for young children with an advisory for coarse language)
NATIONAL
January 19, 2009 | Kim Murphy
John Foley figures he has pretty much maxed out on explaining to African American mothers why it's OK to call a black man the N-word -- as long as it's in a novel that is considered a classic. For years, English teachers have been explaining away the obvious racism in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn."
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
"To Kill a Mockingbird" will once again be on the freshman reading list at Muskogee High School in Oklahoma. The school board voted to reverse a decision removing Harper Lee's 1960 novel from the list. Principal Terry Saul dropped "Mockingbird" after complaints from black students and parents about racial slurs in the text. Assistant Principal Dan Hattaway said a review of the reading list found that "all the books use some language that shouldn't be used in school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
French-born Veronique Peck, who was the widow of actor Gregory Peck and an ardent supporter of civic and cultural causes in her adopted country, died Friday of heart failure at her Los Angeles home, her family said. She was 80. As a young journalist, Veronique met Peck in 1953 when she interviewed him for a French newspaper. They were married on New Year's EveĀ 1955, soon after his divorce from his first wife was finalized. "I just participate in everything Greg does. I like it that way. I am not a career woman," Veronique told The Times in 1967 when the newspaper named her Woman of the Year.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
It stands to reason that Gregory Peck would have been in love with his beautiful, charming and gallant wife, Veronique . For just about anyone else who knew her, it also stands to reason that we were in love with her too. Her admirers fell by the besotted scores, from a Whole Foods manager she befriended to the sachems of L.A.'s charities and whole constellations of film stars. Veronique was a wholly marvelous and admirable woman, and someone I loved as my friend. Even those who had never met her had much to admire about her: Her deeply thoughtful and humane charity work spanned the $50 million she and Greg raised for the American Cancer Society decades ago, an inner-city repertory theater in South Los Angeles, to the Los Angeles public library system, and the hugely popular Gregory Peck reading series at the Central Library, an event to which she did not just lend her name and Greg's, but her presence -- there she was, in the audience, hanging on every word.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Pulitzer Prize in fiction, announced Monday, has been awarded to Adam Johnson for his book set in North Korea, "The Orphan Master's Son. " The committee described the book as "an exquisitely crafted novel that carries the reader on an adventuresome journey into the depths of totalitarian North Korea and into the most intimate spaces of the human heart. " Johnson teaches at Stanford; "The Orphan Master's Son" is his third book. Sharon Olds won the poetry award for her collection "Stag's Leap," cited as "a stunningly poignant sequence of poems that tells the story of a divorce, embracing strands of love, sex, sorrow, memory and new freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In the end, it all came down to Jack and Chloe, surely one of television's most complicated, and unconsummated, romances. Yes, Chloe (Mary Lynn Rajskub) is married and Jack ( Kiefer Sutherland) has had his string of disastrous love affairs, but it was Chloe who saved him from all his enemies, including, in the second-to-the-last hour of the series, himself. And it was Chloe to whom Jack directed his final farewell via drone satellite. "When you first came to CTU," he said, bloodied but unbowed as ever.
BOOKS
January 20, 1991 | Judith Freeman, Freeman is the author of "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel that recently has been reissued in paperback by Vintage .
"First Confession," Montserrat Fontes' elegiac and powerful first novel, is a coming-of-age story told in the voice of a 9-year-old girl named Andrea, the willful and indulged child of a wealthy Mexican father and a willowy, blond American mother. Both in tone and content, it brings to mind Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" and Carson McCullers' "A Member of the Wedding." The year is 1947, the place a small town on the Texas-Mexico border.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003
The Beverly Hills Community Theater will present free staged readings of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at the City Hall council chamber, 455 N. Rexford Drive in Beverly Hills. The readings are part of the city of Beverly Hills' and Los Angeles magazine's "Read-Around Program" featuring Lee's classic novel. The program also includes a free "Martin Luther King Jr.
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