Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarpo Marx
IN THE NEWS

Harpo Marx

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Susan Fleming Marx, a Ziegfeld Follies girl and film actress of the 1930s who appeared opposite John Wayne and W.C. Fields and later married comedian Harpo Marx, has died. She was 94. Marx, who became a Palm Springs area politician and activist, died Sunday in Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage after a heart attack. In her youth, Susan Fleming aimed for the bright lights of Broadway and danced her way into the biggest stage spots in the late 1920s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Agent Roger Richman had a ton of celebrity clients - James Cagney, Mae West, Maria Callas, Albert Einstein, the Marx brothers, Sigmund Freud, Gypsy Rose Lee and W.C. Fields, to name a few. Contrary to expectations, none of them were overly demanding. "I don't have people calling me in the middle of the night saying there aren't enough red M&Ms in the Green Room," he told The Times in a 2001 interview. The reason was simple: By the time he began advocating for them, they were long dead.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Joseph N. Bell
I have a fat file of ideas that are--at least in my view--worthy of note. What follows are a handful of those items, a grab bag of thoughts and comments: One of the more satisfying perks of writing a column is occasionally enabling people to connect with one another through something I've written. That happened recently as the result of a column I did about the son of Harpo Marx, who entertained at a wedding reception I attended in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Susan Fleming Marx, a Ziegfeld Follies girl and film actress of the 1930s who appeared opposite John Wayne and W.C. Fields and later married comedian Harpo Marx, has died. She was 94. Marx, who became a Palm Springs area politician and activist, died Sunday in Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage after a heart attack. In her youth, Susan Fleming aimed for the bright lights of Broadway and danced her way into the biggest stage spots in the late 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrol McLaughlin has to buck the stereotype that harp music is as staid and somber as an undertakers' convention. She even dresses up like a famous funnyman to make her point. That's right. This harpist's repertory features compositions that Harpo Marx used to play, and she sometimes dons a get-up to transform herself into the curly-haired brother.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | JOAN FANTAZIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Star-struck Lucy meets Rock Hudson, Cornel Wilde and Bob Hope this week, but it's her encounter with Harpo Marx that leaves her speechless, in a classic scene on "I Love Lucy" (Friday at 9:30 a.m. on KTTV). Lucy gets herself into a jam-but then when doesn't she?-by bragging to her friends that while the Ricardos and Mertzes are in Hollywood, they've been palling around with the stars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1989
In regard to the loss of the "national treasure" by the name of Lucille Ball: When my friend Sally was close to dying in the hospital from a rare form of spinal cancer the one thing she wanted to do was watch "I Love Lucy." To her disappointment, the hospital TV system could not get the station that aired the show. So every day, a few minutes before noon, I would call her, long distance, put the telephone receiver up to the TV set and do play-by-play Lucy: "Lucy's stomping the grapes . . . she lost her ring in the BBQ pit . . . she's imitating Harpo Marx . . . Lucy brought a puppy home for little Ricky . . . she's stuffing the chocolates in her mouth as fast as she can and the conveyor belt just sped up. . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997
Not to rain on anyone's entrepreneurial parade, but we've been playing our own version of the Kevin Bacon/Starcrossed game since the early '70s in Chicago, and it's neither limited to certain actors nor requires a cash outlay (Film Clips, by Susan King, May 4). The game is played much like "Bid-A-Note" from "Name That Tune." As an example, a player calls out two actors at random: "Boris Karloff and Cybill Shepherd." Everyone then contemplates for a while, until Player 1 proposes a connection in two jumps.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1996
I was both amused and disheartened by your article on the new film projects to be based on the comedies of Laurel and Hardy, the Three Stooges and the Marx Brothers ("Slapping Around Some New Ideas for Old Shtick," by Steven Smith, March 10). I hope these projects are worthy of their inspiration, but I have my doubts. Larry Harmon's desire to cast Tom Hanks and John Goodman as his Laurel and Hardy certainly does not inspire confidence. While these stars are fine actors and talented comedians in their own right, would they be willing to act as mimics, rather than create their own new interpretations?
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
Two weeks ago, my friend Bruce Sumner was married to my friend, Susan Wallen. It was a warm, informal wedding followed by a terrific reception at the Balboa Bay Club at which the bride and groom were upstaged by the piano player. He was a slight, dark-haired man whose exuberance was carefully controlled during the ceremony but burst out all over at the reception.
NEWS
November 27, 1997
Read Carol O'Connell's newest suspense novel, "Stone Angel," at your own risk. Forget all about the mundane, everyday, workaday chores because you'll have to find out just why the NYPD's Kathleen Mallory (who disappeared at the end of "Killing Critics," O'Connell's third novel) is now in jail in a small Louisiana town. You may have a problem breathing as you turn the pages of this intensely developed, intricately plotted mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997
Not to rain on anyone's entrepreneurial parade, but we've been playing our own version of the Kevin Bacon/Starcrossed game since the early '70s in Chicago, and it's neither limited to certain actors nor requires a cash outlay (Film Clips, by Susan King, May 4). The game is played much like "Bid-A-Note" from "Name That Tune." As an example, a player calls out two actors at random: "Boris Karloff and Cybill Shepherd." Everyone then contemplates for a while, until Player 1 proposes a connection in two jumps.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1996
I was both amused and disheartened by your article on the new film projects to be based on the comedies of Laurel and Hardy, the Three Stooges and the Marx Brothers ("Slapping Around Some New Ideas for Old Shtick," by Steven Smith, March 10). I hope these projects are worthy of their inspiration, but I have my doubts. Larry Harmon's desire to cast Tom Hanks and John Goodman as his Laurel and Hardy certainly does not inspire confidence. While these stars are fine actors and talented comedians in their own right, would they be willing to act as mimics, rather than create their own new interpretations?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrol McLaughlin has to buck the stereotype that harp music is as staid and somber as an undertakers' convention. She even dresses up like a famous funnyman to make her point. That's right. This harpist's repertory features compositions that Harpo Marx used to play, and she sometimes dons a get-up to transform herself into the curly-haired brother.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; R. Daniel Foster is a regular contributor to Valley Life.
If not for Liberace's taste for glitz, chances are that Seymour Lauber would long ago have pursued another career. Lauber was the man behind the chan deliers, 18th-Century furniture and clothing that the late entertainer directed be slathered in pure gold leaf. Lauber, in fact, gilded an entire piano for a Liberace performance at the Hollywood Bowl in 1967.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mention the harp, Alfredo Rolando Ortiz believes, and most Americans conjure up images of Harpo Marx. In his single-minded quest to change that image and broaden the instrument's appeal, Ortiz operates something of a cottage industry out of his Corona home: self-produced CDs, cassettes and instructional videos, self-published books and private harp lessons. He also performs and lectures locally and internationally; he'll give two free recitals tonight at the San Juan Capistrano Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Agent Roger Richman had a ton of celebrity clients - James Cagney, Mae West, Maria Callas, Albert Einstein, the Marx brothers, Sigmund Freud, Gypsy Rose Lee and W.C. Fields, to name a few. Contrary to expectations, none of them were overly demanding. "I don't have people calling me in the middle of the night saying there aren't enough red M&Ms in the Green Room," he told The Times in a 2001 interview. The reason was simple: By the time he began advocating for them, they were long dead.
NEWS
November 27, 1997
Read Carol O'Connell's newest suspense novel, "Stone Angel," at your own risk. Forget all about the mundane, everyday, workaday chores because you'll have to find out just why the NYPD's Kathleen Mallory (who disappeared at the end of "Killing Critics," O'Connell's third novel) is now in jail in a small Louisiana town. You may have a problem breathing as you turn the pages of this intensely developed, intricately plotted mystery.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | JOAN FANTAZIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Star-struck Lucy meets Rock Hudson, Cornel Wilde and Bob Hope this week, but it's her encounter with Harpo Marx that leaves her speechless, in a classic scene on "I Love Lucy" (Friday at 9:30 a.m. on KTTV). Lucy gets herself into a jam-but then when doesn't she?-by bragging to her friends that while the Ricardos and Mertzes are in Hollywood, they've been palling around with the stars.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Joseph N. Bell
I have a fat file of ideas that are--at least in my view--worthy of note. What follows are a handful of those items, a grab bag of thoughts and comments: One of the more satisfying perks of writing a column is occasionally enabling people to connect with one another through something I've written. That happened recently as the result of a column I did about the son of Harpo Marx, who entertained at a wedding reception I attended in Orange County.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|