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Harrier Airplane

NATIONAL
December 17, 2002 | Kevin Sack, Times Staff Writer
Through the viewfinder of his mother's video camera, Jeffrey Smith looked the picture of Marine Corps confidence in the moments before takeoff on June 29, 1992. Fit and trim in his olive flight suit and aviator shades, the 29-year-old pilot flashed a Tom Cruise smile as he made his final preflight checks. He walked around the wings of his AV-8B Harrier, inspected the flaps and climbed nearly all the way into the huge conical intakes, surveying the fan blades for any hint of damage.
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NATIONAL
December 16, 2002 | Kevin Sack, Times Staff Writer
Odd as it may seem, the first thought that crossed Lt. Col. John W. Capito's mind as he felt the initial lash of freezing rain at 15,000 feet was of the 8-year-old boy at the airfield. "Have you ever had to eject?" the youngster had asked as Capito prepared to jet off in his AV-8B Harrier. "No, kid," the 39-year-old Marine told him. "That never really happens." Capito knew better. Harrier pilots must always be prepared for an unscheduled ride up the rails.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | Associated Press
The Marine Corps has grounded about half of its AV-8B Harrier jump jets while it investigates two crashes in the last two weeks. In all, 84 planes were grounded. The planes have the same Rolls-Royce engine model as the aircraft involved in the crashes.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | Associated Press
A U.S. Marine Corps Harrier jump jet crashed into the Red Sea during a night training mission, the U.S. Central Command said Wednesday. The pilot of the AV-8B jet ejected safely and was recovered unhurt by a small boat from the tank-landing ship Manitowoc. The Harrier was flying from the amphibious assault ship Nassau. The command withheld the pilot's name and other details of the crash.
NEWS
January 31, 1991
Both the United States and Britain have versions of the so-called jump jet, popularized during the Falklands War. The unusual fighter, produced for the U.S. Marine Corps., is capable of vertical takeoffs and landings, delivering thousands of pounds of vertically on an unimproved forward site. Crew: one Max speed: .88 Mach at sea level Armament: 25-mm gun, Sidewinder air-to-air missiles, Maverick air-to-ground missile, Laser-guided and gravity bombs, Rocket launchers.
NEWS
January 17, 1991
The enormous concentration of U.S. weapons in the gulf features some of the world's most advanced airplanes and helicopters. Deployed from land bases and U.S. aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf region, these aircraft offer allied forces decisive first-strike capabilities. Sensitive targets in Iraq Major Iraqi Air Bases: Irbil, Basra, Habbaniyah, An Nasiriyah, Kirkuk, Mosul, Shu-aiba, H-3, H-2. Major Nuclear Power Plants: Basra, Dibis, Baghdad.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy has decided to partially waive a contract suspension against Northrop Corp. so that it can obtain critically needed electronic sensors for its AV-8B Harrier, which has been dogged by higher than expected failures of the part, it was disclosed Tuesday.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Marine Corps has begun to ground its AV-8B Harrier jets because of failures in on-board sensor systems supplied by Northrop Corp., which pleaded guilty in February to criminal charges of falsifying tests of the equipment, congressional sources said Monday.
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