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Harriet M Weider

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Board of Supervisors Chairman Harriett M. Wieder, who has loudly criticized gifts received by other county officials and led the call for government ethics reform, Tuesday defended her decision to allow lobbyists to pay for a $1,500 lunch in her honor earlier this year. Wieder maintained that the Jan. 26 lunch would have been allowed under a stringent new gift ban that goes into effect next month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Board of Supervisors Chairman Harriett M. Wieder, who has loudly criticized gifts received by other county officials and led the call for government ethics reform, Tuesday defended her decision to allow lobbyists to pay for a $1,500 lunch in her honor earlier this year. Wieder maintained that the Jan. 26 lunch would have been allowed under a stringent new gift ban that goes into effect next month.
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NEWS
March 10, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR and JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two candidates, both of whom filed less than two hours before the deadline Friday, could offer serious surprise challenges to Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi in the June 5 election. Capizzi is now facing challenges from three prosecutors who work for him, including the chief deputy, who filed Friday.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR and JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two candidates, both of whom filed less than two hours before the deadline Friday, could offer serious surprise challenges to Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi in the June 5 election. Capizzi is now facing challenges from three prosecutors who work for him, including the chief deputy, who filed Friday.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose that you and your co-workers give the boss a couple thousand dollars every few months, just because you like him. And suppose that every year he gives you all a raise. Would company stockholders believe you earned those raises? Or might they suspect that you got them because you were so generous with the boss?
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