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Harriet Miers

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OPINION
October 20, 2005
IF HARRIET E. MIERS WERE A SOFT DRINK, she would be New Coke: a carefully marketed product that no one is buying. The Bush administration deserves most of the blame for this clumsy campaign, but part of the problem is the confirmation process itself. Judicial confirmations, by custom if not design, now proceed mostly through indirection.
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NATIONAL
March 5, 2009 | From Times Wire Services
Lawyers for former President George W. Bush, the House and the Obama administration reached agreement Wednesday to resolve a long-running dispute over the scope of executive power, which will allow lawmakers to question Bush aides Karl Rove and Harriet E. Miers about their role in the firing of nine federal prosecutors in 2006.
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OPINION
October 9, 2005
Welcome to the "Late Show," ladies and gentlemen. It's like the Supreme Court -- anybody can get in here. - David Letterman * Yes, Bush's normally solid right-wing base is complaining loudly about the appointment, saying [Harriet] Miers' views are unknown on hot-button topics ranging from abortion to gay marriage to ... both of those. - Jon Stewart * Records show that she even gave money to Al Gore. She also called President Bush the most brilliant man she's ever met.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
Harriet E. Miers, a member of a diminishing circle of allies who came to Washington in 2001 with President Bush, is resigning as White House counsel at the end of this month, the White House announced Thursday. The ill-fated nomination of Miers to the Supreme Court, in 2005, left Bush tangled in complaints of cronyism and in dispute with his conservative allies.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2005 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
With conservative criticism mounting over the nomination of Harriet E. Miers to the U.S. Supreme Court, President Bush defended his pick during his weekly radio address Saturday, saying he was delivering on what he promised -- "a good conservative judge." "I chose Harriet Miers for the court both because of her accomplishments and because I know her character and her judicial philosophy," he said. "Throughout her life, Ms. Miers has excelled at everything she has done.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A three-judge panel in Fort Worth has dismissed the reprimand of a Texas Supreme Court justice who publicly endorsed his friend Harriet E. Miers after her short-lived U.S. Supreme Court nomination. In a ruling announced Friday, the panel of appeals court judges said Nathan L. Hecht did not violate state rules that bar judges from lending their office's prestige to boost the private interests of themselves or others, and from using their names to endorse candidates for office.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
President Bush indicated Wednesday that Harriet E. Miers' religious beliefs were one reason he nominated her to the Supreme Court -- comments that drew quick criticism from liberal groups, which said religion should not be considered a qualification to sit on the nation's highest bench. Bush's remarks came on the same day that Christian leader James C.
OPINION
October 4, 2005
Didn't President Bush promise to take his time and conduct a thorough and complete search for his Supreme Court nominee? He didn't look far in appointing Harriet Miers, a member of his inner circle. Why does he pretend? Why not say, I've made my choice and I'm not going to listen to anyone. If this weren't such a serious matter, it would be quite a joke on the American people. Women are not going to be happy just because the appointment is a woman. Minorities should be outraged. Of all the qualified people who should have been seriously considered, I find this appointment outrageous.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Before President Bush nominated White House Counsel Harriet E. Miers to the Supreme Court, his deputy chief of staff, Karl Rove, called influential Christian leader James C. Dobson to assure him that Miers was a conservative evangelical Christian, Dobson said in remarks scheduled for broadcast today on his national radio show.
OPINION
October 5, 2005
Re "Bush Selects Close Ally for Court," Oct. 4 Harriet Miers has never been a judge. The president nominated her simply because she, like his lamentable choice for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is a devoted lackey. It's time to say enough. Enough of Bush's fools, followers and fanatics. Enough cronyism and constitutional contempt. We need a real, experienced, moderate judge for the Supreme Court -- or we need a filibuster. SIMON GLICKMAN Los Angeles Once again the White House has shot itself in the foot!
NATIONAL
October 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A three-judge panel in Fort Worth has dismissed the reprimand of a Texas Supreme Court justice who publicly endorsed his friend Harriet E. Miers after her short-lived U.S. Supreme Court nomination. In a ruling announced Friday, the panel of appeals court judges said Nathan L. Hecht did not violate state rules that bar judges from lending their office's prestige to boost the private interests of themselves or others, and from using their names to endorse candidates for office.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
When President Bush accepted Harriet E. Miers' withdrawal as a Supreme Court candidate Thursday, the air immediately filled with fresh advice. Republican lawmakers and conservative activists called on Bush to return to the model of his previous nominee -- new Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. -- and choose a conservative judge with stellar credentials and an intellectual bent. "He has to go strongly for credentials," Republican pollster David Winston said.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2005 | Janet Hook and Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writers
By taking a lead role in sinking the Supreme Court nomination of Harriet E. Miers, the conservative wing of the Republican Party declared its independence from the White House and asserted its claim to steer the party rightward even after the George W. Bush era. Miers' surrender Thursday followed a steady drumbeat of criticism from conservative activists and intellectuals who refused to take their president's word that the nominee was on their side.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2005 | Warren Vieth and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Thursday surrendered to an embarrassingly public insurrection by conservative activists and abandoned the Supreme Court nomination of White House Counsel Harriet E. Miers. The president and his aides tried to put the best face possible on the situation, saying Bush had "reluctantly" accepted Miers' decision to withdraw her name from consideration because of a likely clash over Senate access to sensitive White House records.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
For a town in which partisan warfare is daily background noise, there is an unusual silence these days on one side: Despite Republican discord over the Supreme Court nomination of Harriet E. Miers, Democrats have been holding their fire. On Capitol Hill, the revelation last week that Miers expressed anti-abortion views on a questionnaire as a Dallas City Council candidate years ago found most Democrats studiously avoiding confrontation on what is usually a fire-hot controversy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
MOVE over Eddie Haskell. Harriet E. Miers could teach you a thing or two about sucking up. Papers released last week by the Texas state archives show a woman who admired the boss and wasn't afraid to show it, with puppy dog cards and flowery notes in her own hand, often added to official typed correspondence. "You are the best Governor ever -- deserving of great respect!" Miers wrote to George W. Bush in a belated card for his 51st birthday.
OPINION
October 4, 2005 | MICHAEL NEWMAN
IT'S HARD TO have an opinion on a subject you know very little about. It is not impossible, however, and this morning editorial writers rise to the occasion with President Bush's Supreme Court nominee, Harriet Miers. The first step is to admit ignorance. For the Wall Street Journal, "the nominee is mostly a Texas mystery." The New York Times worries that Miers' record "is so thin that no one seems to have any idea of what she believes."
NATIONAL
October 18, 2005 | Maura Reynolds and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter emerged from a lengthy meeting Monday with Supreme Court nominee Harriet E. Miers saying she told him she believed that the Constitution includes a right to privacy -- an account of the meeting that was later disputed. "She said she believes there is a right to privacy in the Constitution," the Pennsylvania Republican told reporters after a meeting with Miers that lasted 1 hour and 40 minutes.
OPINION
October 20, 2005
Re "Make Miers pass a litmus test," Opinion, Oct. 18 Michael Stokes Paulsen and John Yoo, distinguished men of law both, nonetheless make a typical conservative error in describing "the judicial invention of rights not set forth in the Constitution." Surely they have read the 9th Amendment: "The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people." Surely they know that when the framers drafted the Bill of Rights, their intent was not to put a ceiling on individual rights but rather a floor.
OPINION
October 20, 2005
IF HARRIET E. MIERS WERE A SOFT DRINK, she would be New Coke: a carefully marketed product that no one is buying. The Bush administration deserves most of the blame for this clumsy campaign, but part of the problem is the confirmation process itself. Judicial confirmations, by custom if not design, now proceed mostly through indirection.
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