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Harriett M Wieder

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County district attorney's office has questioned executives of the Koll Co., a prominent development firm, about their contributions to Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder's 1990 reelection campaign, company officials said Wednesday. At issue is more than $5,000 in contributions made by 23 Koll Co. executives about the time that Wieder made a campaign appearance at the company's Newport Beach headquarters last October.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE
Former Orange County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder has been appointed to the National Advisory Environmental Health and Sciences Council, a group that advises the federal government on matters related to environmental health. "I'm delighted that we will be able to use your wisdom," Donna E. Shalala, U.S. secretary of health and human services, wrote to Wieder in a letter informing her of the appointment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK and ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Veteran Supervisor Thomas F. Riley was the top fund-raiser among the three Orange County supervisors up for reelection in June, with campaign contributions totaling $107,100, according to financial statements filed this week. Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder of Huntington Beach has raised the least of the three board members on the campaign trail, reporting $148.40 in contributions. Newly elected Board Chairman Don R. Roth raised $71,172 during the latest reporting period, July 1 to Dec. 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1996
Former County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder was appointed Thursday by President Clinton to an advisory board on U.S. trade policy. The Commission on U.S.-Pacific Trade & Investment Policy advises the president on how to increase U.S. trade opportunities in Japan and other Asian countries. The 18-member board includes representatives of business, government and academia. Wieder, of Huntington Beach, said she is excited about the opportunity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988
Harriett M. Wieder made two big mistakes in trying to deceive the public about her education. First was continuing the deception for so long. Second was her belief that anyone would care whether she went to college. What else, we all must wonder, has she been doing to deceive us? PHILLIP MAYBERRY Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1995 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Orange County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder will be appointed by President Clinton to a federal agency that recommends ways to make government more efficient and less costly, the White House announced Wednesday. Wieder will serve on a 10-member board that is the governing body of the Council of the Administrative Conference of the United States. "I'm really excited about it," she said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1995
Your editorial, "O.C. Should Heed Some Timely Advice," (May 14) is heartening in that it reflects that "someone is finally listening." In 1993, as then the chairman of the Board of Supervisors, I invited the business community, cities and academia represented by Partnership 2010 to explore whether taxpayers were getting the best value for their services and whether the multiplicity of governmental jurisdictions was efficient. And necessary. Partnership 2010's President Tim Cooley accepted the challenge and Project HI-GEAR (Government Efficiency and Restructuring)
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | MARK PLATTE and MATT LAIT and SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Orange County officials predicted layoffs as soon as next month, retiring Supervisors Thomas F. Riley and Harriett M. Wieder expressed remorse Tuesday over the financial crisis that has pushed the county into bankruptcy. "I don't know about you, but I wish I had listened just a bit more, questioned just a bit more, and trusted just a bit less," said Riley, 82, a former Marine general and 20-year board veteran.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | MARK PLATTE and MATT LAIT and SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Orange County officials predicted layoffs as soon as next month, retiring Supervisors Thomas F. Riley and Harriett M. Wieder expressed remorse Tuesday over the financial crisis that has pushed the county into bankruptcy. "I don't know about you, but I wish I had listened just a bit more, questioned just a bit more, and trusted just a bit less," said Riley, 82, a former Marine general and 20-year board veteran.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They didn't want it to end like this. After 36 years of county service between them, Thomas F. Riley and Harriett M. Wieder were supposed to be lauded for their lengthy list of accomplishments upon their retirement. But instead of a Marine marching band at the pair's final Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday, they were often greeted by catcalls from some angry members of the audience.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Marine Corps Gen. Thomas F. Riley has no doubt seen pomp and elegant send-offs, but there would be none of that Tuesday as he ended two decades on the County Board of Supervisors. No medals, no gushy plaque exchange, no honor guard--not a Boy Scout in sight. Just a guy berating him in an orange mini-skirt with a boombox, threatening to play a song meant to disparage the supervisor's manhood. At least fellow retiring Supervisor Harriett M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1994 | BERT ELJERA
Orange County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder has presented two checks worth $239,000 to the City Council to pay for improvements to some of the city's parks. A $200,000 grant from the county's Urban Parks program will be used to add lighting and other improvements to the athletic field of McAuliffe Middle School. The city also received a $39,000 grant to buy playground equipment at Labourdette, Sterns, Soroptomist, Roberts and Little Cottonwood parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA
The county has won a $5,000 small claims judgment against the driver and the owners of a car that collided with Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder and caused significant damage to her county-owned Chrysler. Wieder said Tuesday that she feels "absolutely vindicated" by the judgment, the maximum a judge can award in a small claims action. "I've kind of taken a rap for something I've always taken pride in--that is being a good driver," she said.
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