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BUSINESS
July 31, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Phillips-Van Heusen Corp. has agreed to pay $79 million for G. H. Bass & Co., the New England shoemaker that has found an enduring market for its 50-year-old Bass Weejuns loafer, it was announced Thursday. As part of several major transactions announced Thursday, some of which appeared to strengthen the company's ability to fight off a possible hostile takeover, Phillips-Van Heusen said it will buy back slightly more than a third of its stock for $145.6 million.
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NEWS
August 12, 1994 | GERI COOK
When the Jan. 17 earthquake demolished the Harris & Frank store in Northridge, the menswear chain found itself without a location in the San Fernando Valley and also without an outlet store. So it uncovered an almost invisible warehouse in North Hollywood and in April opened the Harris & Frank Warehouse Outlet, where first-quality men's apparel is sold at deep discounts. This is actually an experiment for Harris & Frank.
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NEWS
August 12, 1994 | GERI COOK
When the Jan. 17 earthquake demolished the Harris & Frank store in Northridge, the menswear chain found itself without a location in the San Fernando Valley and also without an outlet store. So it uncovered an almost invisible warehouse in North Hollywood and in April opened the Harris & Frank Warehouse Outlet, where first-quality men's apparel is sold at deep discounts. This is actually an experiment for Harris & Frank.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Phillips-Van Heusen Corp. has agreed to pay $79 million for G. H. Bass & Co., the New England shoemaker that has found an enduring market for its 50-year-old Bass Weejuns loafer, it was announced Thursday. As part of several major transactions announced Thursday, some of which appeared to strengthen the company's ability to fight off a possible hostile takeover, Phillips-Van Heusen said it will buy back slightly more than a third of its stock for $145.6 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | GERI COOK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you are an antique hound or if you love the traditional European folk look in home furnishings you may already know about this bargain source . . . European Antique Imports, where wholesale prices are the norm. Owner Ken Peterson travels to the Baltic states (Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania), Russia and Scandinavia two or three times a year to handpick the inventory his team has uncovered in small towns and the countryside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992
The story about (Macy subsidiary) Bullock's uncertain future (front page, Jan. 28) contained one glaring error to a native Angeleno. The Art-Deco Bullock's Wilshire (now an I. Magnin) is not on the Miracle Mile. The Miracle Mile is (or was, depending on if it is still called that) the area of Wilshire Boulevard bounded by La Brea on the east and Fairfax to the west. In its youth, it contained the El Rey movie theater, which is now a Russian restaurant; family restaurants such as Van de Kamp's, Tilford's, the Ontra Cafeteria and Dupars; quality stores, including the multistoried Coulter's department store (which later became a Broadway)
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
Wondering why you couldn't cruise down Rodeo Drive Tuesday night? It seems Turkey's First Lady, Semra Ozal, was in town to do a little shopping. Before she could drop into Bijan the street had to be cleared of all traffic and pedestrians. She arrived with a motorcade escort and a phalanx of body guards. Her big purchase consisted of two solid gold guns, at $10,000 each. * CLOSE SHAVE: Linda Silver has discovered how loyal her customers really are.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1996
Antone B. Wenda, a retired men's clothing salesman and 36-year resident of Ventura, died Thursday in a local hospital following a brief illness. He was 89. The youngest of eight children, "Tony," as he was known, was born July 18, 1907, in Belleville, Kan. He attended school in Belleville and then moved to Salem, Ore., where he began selling men's clothing. Later, he joined the Army, working his way up to the rank of sergeant, according to his stepdaughter, Dorothy Colleran, of Ventura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2006 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
On New Year's Day 1990, the young men of the USC football team won the biggest game of their lives. Led by first-year quarterback Todd Marinovich, the Trojans fought their way past the University of Michigan Wolverines in the Rose Bowl. The score had been tied until the final two minutes, when Ricky Ervins, the diminutive tailback from Pasadena, ran in the final touchdown for a 17-10 victory and was named the Rose Bowl's most valuable player in his hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors, when they're in their tour-de-force mode, sometimes glom onto aggressively silly or sentimental roles for dear life. "Wrestling Ernest Hemingway" (selected theaters) has not one but two of these roles. Robert Duvall plays Walter, a retired Cuban barber in south Florida, and Richard Harris is Frank, an Irish ex-sea captain. The movie is supposed to be about how these two disparate gents become friends, but it's really about scenery eating.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1994 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men's tailored clothing business has been unraveling for years, particularly in Los Angeles. The flagging economy and Southern California's dress-down attitude have made it a graveyard for many sellers of men's suits. That didn't stop George Zimmer, chairman of Men's Wearhouse, a Fremont, Calif.-based discount suit retailer. Zimmer entered the Los Angeles market by opening 10 Southland stores in the past four months, and he plans to open a dozen more in the region this year.
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