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Harrison Engle

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The question is not large, relative to matters of international relations or the debt crisis. But it gets to the heart of persisting attitudes about jazz and jazzmakers. Will popular audiences accept a portrait of a great jazzman who is also a solid citizen with no known major bad habits? Harrison Engle, whose documentary on Theodore Roosevelt, "T.R.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The question is not large, relative to matters of international relations or the debt crisis. But it gets to the heart of persisting attitudes about jazz and jazzmakers. Will popular audiences accept a portrait of a great jazzman who is also a solid citizen with no known major bad habits? Harrison Engle, whose documentary on Theodore Roosevelt, "T.R.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1991 | Kevin Thomas, Compiled by Michael Wilmington
F ollowing are The Times' recommendations for today's schedule of the American Film Institute Los Angeles International Film Festival, with commentary by the film reviewing staff. Information: (213) 466-1767. Recommended: "BENNY CARTER: A SYMPHONY IN RIFFS"(United States; Harrison Engle; Monica; 7 p.m.). A warm, informative documentary on the incredibly rich life and career of one of the most self-effacing and enduring jazz greats.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
At 84, Benny Carter is rightly regarded as one of the masters of jazz. In his extraordinary 65-year career, which is still going strong, he has excelled as an alto saxophonist, composer, arranger, racial barrier-breaker and jazz dignitary, with lesser, though sometimes substantial, success as a trumpeter, bandleader and singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Filmex opens tonight with the British comedy "A Private Function," a return to the kind of humor which marked Britain's glory days and which has already won three British equivalents of the Oscars--for its actress and supporting actor and actress. (Word is that we will have it commercially within the month.) And after that, the deluge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Here is the story of Harrison and Marilyn Engle's seven-year itch. In 1979, Engle decided to make a documentary about Theodore Roosevelt, the nation's 26th President. It took almost three years to get it funded, a little more than a year to get it made, another two years to secure a national TV outlet, almost another year to get it on the air. And now, finally, happily, thank goodness, "The Indomitable Teddy Roosevelt" arrives at 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The movie that gave new meaning to the words "hair gel" has finally been digitalized. But Fox's DVD version of the mega-hit 1998 comedy "There's Something About Mary" ($35) is a mixed bag. The outtakes from the farce starring Ben Stiller, Cameron Diaz and Matt Dillon are only marginally funny. The disc includes the "Build Me Up Buttercup" music video that is also featured over the end movie titles. But Fox is guilty of overkill by also offering the karaoke-style music video. What makes this wide-screen version of "Mary" worthwhile, though, is the commentary from directors and co-writers Peter and Bobby Farrelly, who are a hoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Tom Seidman has almost completed his documentary about the city's homeless, titled "Lost Angeles." He spent months befriending and mingling with his subjects, then many more months editing his 40 hours of footage into 55 minutes of compelling video, lacking only a final cut that would include polishing and production credits. And now, a year later, his documentary is homeless, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reasonable person sitting through Michael Moore's critically praised documentary "Roger & Me" might come away from the film believing that since 1986, when Moore began his two-year quest to get General Motors chairman Roger Smith to visit economically-depressed Flint, Mich., that: * An automotive theme park, a mall and a new Hyatt Regency hotel had been initiated to encourage tourism during that period.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Funding is tough, distribution is difficult, pressures of censorship loom, but as hundreds of filmmakers gather here for the first International Documentary Congress, perhaps the biggest obstacle they face is a widespread belief that documentaries are nothing but a snooze. "It's sort of ironic that people tend to shy away or duck for cover when they hear the word," said Marc Weiss, the senior executive producer of the PBS documentary series "P.O.V."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Like today's tabloid television hits "America's Most Wanted" and "Unsolved Mysteries," Arnold Shapiro's newest documentary, "Fatal Passions," involves the re-enactment of lurid crimes--in this case, the murder or attempted murder of six people by family members or loved ones. But producer Shapiro and some others in the documentary film-making business believe that such re-enactment of events and other dramatic means of presenting facts do not necessarily define a project as "tabloid television."
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