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Harry Browne

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2006 | From Associated Press
Harry Browne, who twice ran for president as the Libertarian Party candidate, has died. He was 72. Browne, an author and investment advisor, died of Lou Gehrig's disease at his home in Franklin, Tenn., on Wednesday night, said family friend Jim Babka. Browne received 485,134 votes, or 0.5%, for president in 1996 and 384,431 votes, or 0.367%, in 2000. He never held elective office, Babka said. Browne campaigned actively across the country, promoting the value of smaller government.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to The Times
Harry Brown Sony, $27.96; Blu-ray, $30.95 Anyone hankering for an old-fashioned "angry, old man" movie could do a lot worse than "Harry Brown," a moody, at times brutal drama about what happens when a London pensioner decides he's had it with the gangs in his neighborhood. Michael Caine plays the title character, a retired soldier who terrorizes criminals after their misbehavior prevents him from saying goodbye to his dying wife. The tone of "Harry Brown" ranges from somnambulant to wildly melodramatic, but Caine holds down the center well, and his revenge against the punks is cathartic to watch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid raucous claps and chants, Libertarian Party delegates Sunday selected an author and former investment advisor as their presidential candidate--although Harry Browne readily admits that he'll be lucky to get more than a million votes. Meeting at the Marriott Hotel in Anaheim, the party delegates cast 493 of 878 votes in favor of Browne, who represented the party in a 1996 presidential bid and received nearly 500,000 votes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2010
Liberal guilt won out over a British hitman amid films in limited release this weekend. Director Nicole Holofcener's well-reviewed drama "Please Give," starring Catherine Keener, opened to an estimated $128,696 at three theaters in New York City and two in Los Angeles this weekend, giving it a healthy per-location average of $25,739. "Harry Brown," which stars Michael Caine as a reluctant aging vigilante, debuted to a decent but less impressive $180,957 at 19 theaters in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1996
Re "Debate for Two Is a Loss for Voters," Commentary, Sept. 6: William Bradley writes, regarding the presidential debates, that minor party candidates Ross Perot, Ralph Nader and Harry Browne may not have answers, but that they do have some of the questions. He argues for including them in the debates. But how about including them by making them the questioners? (The time for putting a question would have to be strictly limited or they would turn questions into speeches.) Who more than these three might better be able in asking the questions to "get outside the thoroughly ritualized theater that conventional American politics has become"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996
Re "Clinton's Lead Over Dole Widens in State to 27 Points," July 18: Various opinion polls have shown a high interest in, and a desire for, a third political party in America. Only one national political party, the Libertarian Party, has already held its convention and chosen its presidential candidate, Harry Browne. Despite these facts, The Times chose not to include Harry Browne in its presidential preference poll. Is there an explanation for this? Perhaps Browne would have fared poorly in the poll, but how will you ever know if you don't ask. ERNST F. GHERMANN Winnetka This is not a good year for Republicans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996
The exclusion of billionaire crackpot Ross Perot from this year's debates (Sept. 18) isn't nearly as significant as the exclusion of Libertarian Party candidate Harry Browne, who will be on every ballot in America this November. Browne's first duty as president would be to eliminate the federal income tax. Personally, I would have loved to see Bill Clinton try arguing in favor of the status quo, and Bob Dole trying to counter with a hollow promise to cut rates by a measly 15%. Browne would have wiped up the floor with them!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and JAIMEE ROSE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Art Olivier's 5-year-old daughter put him on the spot Monday. "Daddy," she asked, "are you the vice president yet?" "Not yet," Olivier replied. To be honest, he could have added, "And probably not ever." Still, Olivier, an aerospace engineer and former mayor of Bellflower, can truthfully claim to be a vice presidential candidate--a heartbeat, as it were, from losing the presidency.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1996 | JAMES BATES
Sen. Bob Dole's Republican presidential primary victories last week may have chased such contenders as Lamar Alexander and Richard Lugar out of the race. But at least one White House aspirant is sticking with it, and documenting his quest in a unique diary on the World Wide Web.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1995 | JAMES BATES
The art of television punditry reached an art form during the O.J. Simpson trial, with everyone from defense lawyer Gerry Spence to author Dominick Dunne churning out opinions each night for the airwaves. Now with the trial over, there are still plenty of pundits looking for exposure. Witness the just-published 1996 edition of the "Yearbook of Experts, Authorities & Spokespersons," an 864-page encyclopedia of people willing to offer opinions on virtually any topic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With its mix of minor-key character study and guns a-blazin' action, "Harry Brown" provides a powerful platform for two-time Oscar winner Michael Caine to play off the iconography of his previous characters, such as Jack Carter in "Get Carter" and Harry Palmer in "The Ipcress File." But "Harry Brown" is much more than just a homage to Caine's double-barreled past. "For me, it … is not a violent film, it's a film about violence," the 77-year-old Caine said recently. As "Harry Brown" opens, Caine's titular character, an elderly widower, sheepishly takes the long way around a pedestrian underpass to avoid the hooligans who hang about its entrance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Like smokestack soot, revenge colors "Harry Brown," the smartly done socio-economic killer thriller that has Michael Caine at 77 armed and dangerous and mucking around in a world grown toxic around him. Set in a gritty present-day British housing project, circumstance soon turns Caine's Harry from a chess-playing pensioner into a one-man wrecking crew determined to exact justice and bring some order to his drug-infested neighborhood. But no one, most of all Caine, is playing the sympathy card here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2006 | From Associated Press
Harry Browne, who twice ran for president as the Libertarian Party candidate, has died. He was 72. Browne, an author and investment advisor, died of Lou Gehrig's disease at his home in Franklin, Tenn., on Wednesday night, said family friend Jim Babka. Browne received 485,134 votes, or 0.5%, for president in 1996 and 384,431 votes, or 0.367%, in 2000. He never held elective office, Babka said. Browne campaigned actively across the country, promoting the value of smaller government.
BOOKS
May 18, 2003 | Thom Powers, Thom Powers is the director of the documentary "Guns & Mothers," airing on PBS' Independent Lens this month, and is the author of a forthcoming history of American documentary filmmaking, "Stranger Than Fiction."
On April 9, while America's attention was fixed on its troops conquering Baghdad, the National Rifle Assn. was celebrating a different victory. That day the U.S. House of Representatives quietly passed a bill that would ban most gunshot victims from suing gun makers and dealers. If the Senate follows and President Bush signs the bill, it will be a resounding defeat for gun victims who put their faith in the courts.
BOOKS
August 26, 2001 | SAUL LANDAU, Saul Landau directs Digital Media Programs and International Outreach at Cal Poly Pomona's College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences. His latest film is "Maquila: A Tale of Two Mexicos."
In August 1989, I sat at dinner with Gen. Manuel Noriega, commander of the Panama Defense Forces. Drinks in hand, a small crowd of supporters, scholars attending a conference and reporters awaited his arrival as nervous-eyed body guards, dressed in leisure suits with appropriate bulges for weapons, escorted him from an armor-plated Cherokee 4 x 4 and into the former residence of Omar Torrijos, Noriega's predecessor and the father-figure of modern Panamanian nationalism.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not a good night on the stump for Harry Browne, Libertarian for president. A late summer lightning storm crackles outside. But inside this dairy-land town's biggest hotel, the air lacks electricity. The 100 folks assembled to hear Browne seem sleepy, bludgeoned by a blue-collar workday. They yawn at punch lines, clap sporadically, shrink when asked to feed the campaign kitty. A big group hogging the front rows slinks out before Browne even opens for questions.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not a good night on the stump for Harry Browne, Libertarian for president. A late summer lightning storm crackles outside. But inside this dairy-land town's biggest hotel, the air lacks electricity. The 100 folks assembled to hear Browne seem sleepy, bludgeoned by a blue-collar workday. They yawn at punch lines, clap sporadically, shrink when asked to feed the campaign kitty. A big group hogging the front rows slinks out before Browne even opens for questions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and JAIMEE ROSE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Art Olivier's 5-year-old daughter put him on the spot Monday. "Daddy," she asked, "are you the vice president yet?" "Not yet," Olivier replied. To be honest, he could have added, "And probably not ever." Still, Olivier, an aerospace engineer and former mayor of Bellflower, can truthfully claim to be a vice presidential candidate--a heartbeat, as it were, from losing the presidency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid raucous claps and chants, Libertarian Party delegates Sunday selected an author and former investment advisor as their presidential candidate--although Harry Browne readily admits that he'll be lucky to get more than a million votes. Meeting at the Marriott Hotel in Anaheim, the party delegates cast 493 of 878 votes in favor of Browne, who represented the party in a 1996 presidential bid and received nearly 500,000 votes.
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