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Harry Butch Jr Reynolds

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July 21, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Butch Reynolds decided to forgo his senior year at Ohio State to prepare himself for the Olympic Games. So maybe he never got around to a course in the modern novel. He said Wednesday night that he had found himself in a "Catch 2 situation." But perhaps that was more appropriate.
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August 18, 1988 | from Staff and Wire Reports
Pursuing one of the two longest-standing records in track and field, Butch Reynolds of Ohio chased it down Wednesday night, setting the world 400-meter record in 43.29 seconds at a Grand Prix track meet. Reynolds, who took a year off from Ohio State to concentrate on the Seoul Olympics, Sept. 17-Oct. 2, broke Lee Evans' mark, which stood for nearly 20 years, by more than half a second. Evans ran 43.86 at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, a record set at high altitude.
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SPORTS
May 30, 1988 | MIKE DOWNEY
For Harry (Butch) Reynolds Jr., maybe Saturday will be the day. The day he turns loose the juice. The day he leaves Lee Evans behind. The day he runs the fastest quarter-mile ever run. It could happen at the Pepsi Invitational at UCLA, which will feature five of the fleetest 400-meter speeders you ever did see. Or, maybe Butch will have to wait. Wait for the Summer Olympics. Wait for that hi-beam spotlight. Wait to break Evans' 43.
SPORTS
July 21, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Butch Reynolds decided to forgo his senior year at Ohio State to prepare himself for the Olympic Games. So maybe he never got around to a course in the modern novel. He said Wednesday night that he had found himself in a "Catch 2 situation." But perhaps that was more appropriate.
SPORTS
August 18, 1988 | from Staff and Wire Reports
Pursuing one of the two longest-standing records in track and field, Butch Reynolds of Ohio chased it down Wednesday night, setting the world 400-meter record in 43.29 seconds at a Grand Prix track meet. Reynolds, who took a year off from Ohio State to concentrate on the Seoul Olympics, Sept. 17-Oct. 2, broke Lee Evans' mark, which stood for nearly 20 years, by more than half a second. Evans ran 43.86 at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, a record set at high altitude.
SPORTS
May 30, 1988 | MIKE DOWNEY
For Harry (Butch) Reynolds Jr., maybe Saturday will be the day. The day he turns loose the juice. The day he leaves Lee Evans behind. The day he runs the fastest quarter-mile ever run. It could happen at the Pepsi Invitational at UCLA, which will feature five of the fleetest 400-meter speeders you ever did see. Or, maybe Butch will have to wait. Wait for the Summer Olympics. Wait for that hi-beam spotlight. Wait to break Evans' 43.
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