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Harry C Stern

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BUSINESS
July 1, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
The founder of a failed San Jose investment firm agreed Thursday to plead guilty to three federal criminal charges, the day after a jury awarded a record $147 million in punitive damages to investors in his company. The U.S. attorney's office in San Jose filed mail and securities fraud charges against Harry C. Stern, the founder and former chairman of Technical Equities, and John Lindberg, a former executive in the firm. Joseph M. Burton, the assistant U.S.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Technical Equities founder Harry Stern was sentenced to a maximum five years in federal prison for securities and mail fraud. U.S. District Judge William Ingram on Wednesday gave Stern the maximum sentence possible under an agreement with the U.S. Attorney's Office in exchange for his cooperation in the case. Before receiving his sentence, Stern stood before the judge and read a brief statement, saying his "greatest sorrow" was that his clients lost their money.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
In the fall of 1985, author and psychologist Charles Garfield told stockbroker Michael J. Doherty that he wanted to sell his 12,000 shares of stock in a San Jose firm called Technical Equities. Garfield said he was concerned about the financial condition of the high-flying investment and management firm. He called its explanations for recent problems "shaky." According to court documents, Doherty tried to persuade Garfield not to sell.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
In the fall of 1985, author and psychologist Charles Garfield told stockbroker Michael J. Doherty that he wanted to sell his 12,000 shares of stock in a San Jose firm called Technical Equities. Garfield said he was concerned about the financial condition of the high-flying investment and management firm. He called its explanations for recent problems "shaky." According to court documents, Doherty tried to persuade Garfield not to sell.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Technical Equities founder Harry Stern was sentenced to a maximum five years in federal prison for securities and mail fraud. U.S. District Judge William Ingram on Wednesday gave Stern the maximum sentence possible under an agreement with the U.S. Attorney's Office in exchange for his cooperation in the case. Before receiving his sentence, Stern stood before the judge and read a brief statement, saying his "greatest sorrow" was that his clients lost their money.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
The state Board of Accountancy has decided to examine whether outside accountants were negligent in failing to detect problems at Technical Equities before the San Jose investment and management firm collapsed in 1986, a board official said Tuesday. The official said the board decided to review a finding by an administrative law judge recommending that no disciplinary action be taken against four individual accountants and their former employer, KMG Main Hurdman.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
The founder of a failed San Jose investment firm agreed Thursday to plead guilty to three federal criminal charges, the day after a jury awarded a record $147 million in punitive damages to investors in his company. The U.S. attorney's office in San Jose filed mail and securities fraud charges against Harry C. Stern, the founder and former chairman of Technical Equities, and John Lindberg, a former executive in the firm. Joseph M. Burton, the assistant U.S.
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