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April 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
A court-martial convicted a Marine of assault Tuesday for shooting two Somali teen-agers after one grabbed the prescription sunglasses off his face. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Harry Conde, 33, based at Twentynine Palms, Calif., was lowered one grade in rank and fined $1,706, his monthly base pay. He could have received up to 10 years in prison and a dishonorable discharge. Conde had claimed self-defense, saying he fired a 40-millimeter shotgun shell from an M-79 grenade launcher Feb.
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NEWS
April 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
A court-martial convicted a Marine of assault Tuesday for shooting two Somali teen-agers after one grabbed the prescription sunglasses off his face. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Harry Conde, 33, based at Twentynine Palms, Calif., was lowered one grade in rank and fined $1,706, his monthly base pay. He could have received up to 10 years in prison and a dishonorable discharge. Conde had claimed self-defense, saying he fired a 40-millimeter shotgun shell from an M-79 grenade launcher Feb.
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NEWS
March 26, 1993 | Reuters
U.S. military authorities have dropped charges against a Marine who shot and killed a 13-year-old Somali boy last month, military spokesman Col. Fred Peck said Thursday. Peck said officials decided "after careful review" that no action would be taken against Sgt. Walter Andrew Johnson, who killed Omar Ahmed Mohamed on Feb. 4. Johnson, who also wounded two bystanders, opened fire in the belief that the boy was about to drop something, probably an explosive device, into the marines' vehicle.
NEWS
March 17, 1993 | Times Wire Services
The U.S. military held a public hearing Tuesday into possible murder charges against a Marine who shot and killed a Somali boy last month. The Marine, Sgt. Walter Andrew Johnson, 25, of Abilene, Tex., was riding at the back of a two-vehicle convoy from the coalition headquarters to the airport when a tractor-trailer rig stopped at a bottleneck in the midst of a busy marketplace, forcing two Humvees, including Johnson's, to halt behind it.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
A U.S. Marine pleaded guilty Saturday during a court-martial on charges of theft and assault for grabbing a vendor's canes and hitting the man when he gave chase. Pfc. Larry T. Thomas of Maricopa County, Ariz., was sentenced to two months of confinement, a month at hard labor, a fine and a reduction in rank on charges of theft and assault. He is the first American serviceman to be convicted of misconduct since U.S.-led coalition forces arrived on Dec.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
A Marine testified Friday that he shot two Somali teen-agers in self-defense, saying foreign troops must view every Somali on the street as a potential threat. Gunnery Sgt. Harry Conde, testifying on the last day of a two-day hearing to decide whether he faces a court-martial, compared the soldiers' feelings to those of U.S. troops in Vietnam who feared civilians were armed. "Some people want us here. Some people don't.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American commanders here signaled Wednesday that their troops must answer for killing and wounding Somalis, ordering the first public disciplinary hearings since Operation Restore Hope began for two Marines accused of employing excessive force by firing on unarmed Somali youths in separate incidents last month. In announcing pretrial hearings, the final step in a formal military investigation before possible court-martial, Col. Fred Peck, spokesman for the U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 90 minutes of graphic, often chilling testimony Friday that described the worst fears of many of the 16,000 American troops still here, a Marine gunnery sergeant accused of using excessive force told a pretrial hearing that he fired his M-79 grenade launcher at a 13-year-old because he felt a reasonable fear for his life. Gunnery Sgt.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Harry Conde sat for six hours Thursday in a room at the Mogadishu airport, straining to hear over the thundering helicopters and whining jets nearby. He was intent on the drama unfolding before him here, thousands of miles from his home base at Camp Pendleton, during a proceeding that may determine his military career and set precedents for Somalia and the American force that has spent three months trying to save this country.
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