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Harry Greb

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SPORTS
May 19, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One evening in 1986, Jim Jacobs was talking about his collection of boxing films, the most extensive in the world. "Thomas Edison invented the motion picture camera in 1894," he said. "From 1894 to the present, there is only one great fighter missing from my collection--Harry Greb." Jacobs, who died at 58 in 1988, never gave up hope that one day film of Greb, a brawling middleweight and light-heavyweight champion, would turn up. It has.
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SPORTS
October 22, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He exists today only in yellowed scrapbooks, old boxing books and in barrooms where old-timers gather to talk about great fighters. He was from Pittsburgh, and when Harry Greb, 32, died suddenly 73 years ago today, sports followers of an entire city mourned. He was born Edward Henry Berg and became a tough street kid. When he became a fighter, he reversed Berg to Greb and took the first name of a deceased older brother, Harry. His style was once described by 1920s fight writer W.O.
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SPORTS
October 22, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He exists today only in yellowed scrapbooks, old boxing books and in barrooms where old-timers gather to talk about great fighters. He was from Pittsburgh, and when Harry Greb, 32, died suddenly 73 years ago today, sports followers of an entire city mourned. He was born Edward Henry Berg and became a tough street kid. When he became a fighter, he reversed Berg to Greb and took the first name of a deceased older brother, Harry. His style was once described by 1920s fight writer W.O.
SPORTS
May 19, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One evening in 1986, Jim Jacobs was talking about his collection of boxing films, the most extensive in the world. "Thomas Edison invented the motion picture camera in 1894," he said. "From 1894 to the present, there is only one great fighter missing from my collection--Harry Greb." Jacobs, who died at 58 in 1988, never gave up hope that one day film of Greb, a brawling middleweight and light-heavyweight champion, would turn up. It has.
SPORTS
October 23, 1986 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy Jacobs was talking the other day about old films of major boxing matches, a subject he knows more than a little about, since he owns all the films. Well, almost all of them. Jacobs, co-manager of 20-year-old heavyweight sensation Mike Tyson, began seriously collecting boxing films in 1952 and has amassed a collection so huge that he lost count a decade or so ago.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: I read somewhere that objects stamped "Made in Occupied Japan" have some monetary value. I have a few such objects.--M.S. Answer: Following the end of World War II, Japan's economy was in a shambles. In order to get needed currency, many Japanese crafts people and businesses produced pottery and an assortment of other products to be sold abroad. These pieces usually were marked "Made in Occupied Japan," "Made in Japan" or simply "Japan."
SPORTS
May 23, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If ever a single event in the UCLA-USC rivalry could be called a bombshell, it exploded 43 years ago today. Julius Miller Leavy, a deputy district attorney for Los Angeles County, summoned reporters to a news conference at UCLA's University Club. UCLA had earlier that week been stunned to learn it had been banned by the Pacific Coast Conference from postseason football competition for three years, fined $93,000 and that its entire football team had been declared ineligible for the next season.
SPORTS
October 22, 1999 | SHAV GLICK
Tom Lehman played in an alternate-shot couples' tournament with his wife, Melissa, and learned a lesson in reasoning. The former British Open champion hit his tee shot down the middle about 275 yards on the first hole. Melissa shanked the next shot about 100 yards from the green. Lehman hit their third shot 15 feet from the cup. Melissa's putt ended up 20 feet on the other side. Lehman sank his putt for a bogey.
SPORTS
October 31, 2000 | EARL GUSTKEY
Writing on the controversy over how much (if any) beer sales the Mormon Church will allow at the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, Alan Friedman of the SportsBusiness Journal cites another beverage issue: "The Mormon Church may have bigger beverage worries on its hands. "The frosty temps won't do much for beer vendors, but they'll certainly push sales of another drink also prohibited by the church: coffee." * Trivia time: Who played and who won in the first football game at the Coliseum?
SPORTS
March 23, 1997 | JIM MURRAY
When Michael Moorer got knocked out by the 45-year-old George Foreman with one stunning blow to the chin in the 10th round of a fight in which he was comfortably ahead, the fight mob figured that would be the end of Michael Moorer as a force in boxing. More than his chin would be bruised. So would his self-esteem. They forgot that Dempsey got knocked out by Fireman Jim Flynn--in one round--two years before he became heavyweight champion of the world.
SPORTS
October 23, 1986 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy Jacobs was talking the other day about old films of major boxing matches, a subject he knows more than a little about, since he owns all the films. Well, almost all of them. Jacobs, co-manager of 20-year-old heavyweight sensation Mike Tyson, began seriously collecting boxing films in 1952 and has amassed a collection so huge that he lost count a decade or so ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2006 | Gordon Marino, Special to The Times
GENE TUNNEY won the heavyweight title from Jack Dempsey in 1926. At the time, Dempsey was the most popular athlete on the planet and widely considered unbeatable. Tunney triumphed in their rematch, which took place in Chicago in front of 144,000 spectators a year later. He defended the title once more in 1928 against Tom Heeney, then hung up his gloves with an astonishing record of 58 wins and one defeat. Tunney's only loss occurred against the windmill fists of the legendary Harry Greb in 1922.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | BOB MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Remember Bob Fitzsimmons' "solar plexus" punch that sent James J. Corbett to the canvas in their 1897 bare-fisted heavyweight title bout? What about Jack Dempsey pummeling heavyweight champion Jess Willard in 1919 for the title? Recall Joe Louis in his prime? What about the sleek Sugar Ray Robinson? Nick Beck, a Cal State Los Angeles journalism instructor, certainly remembers. Beck can weave tales about the greatest bouts as if he saw them yesterday because, chances are, he did.
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