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Harry H Culver

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1988 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
A few characteristics immediately stand out about the Culvers: There's a lot of them, and on the whole they're pretty patient. Those family features became evident Saturday as about 100 Culvers waited quietly for more than an hour to find enough working buses to cart them away on their tour of Culver City, the town founded by Harry H. Culver 75 years ago and the reason 180 Culver/Colver cousins converged on the city this weekend for the third national family reunion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1988 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
A few characteristics immediately stand out about the Culvers: There's a lot of them, and on the whole they're pretty patient. Those family features became evident Saturday as about 100 Culvers waited quietly for more than an hour to find enough working buses to cart them away on their tour of Culver City, the town founded by Harry H. Culver 75 years ago and the reason 180 Culver/Colver cousins converged on the city this weekend for the third national family reunion.
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NEWS
September 17, 1987 | SHELDON ITO, Times Staff Writer
Next July marks 75 years since smooth-talking Harry H. Culver plunked down $2,000 for 93 acres of barley fields between Los Angeles and the seashore and started a city. Culver, a real estate developer, saw the area where the old train tracks crossed Washington Boulevard as "the neck of the bottle where everything had to come through," according to a local history.
REAL ESTATE
February 22, 1987 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
What started out as an uneventful canoe ride staged for a silent movie scene back in 1915 led to a significant real estate purchase that would establish the birth place of Metro Goldwyn Mayer's roaring lion and the legendary Culver City "movie lot." Thomas H. Ince, an early California film maker producing pictures at that time along the coast above Santa Monica, needed a stream of water deep enough to float three canoes full of Indians.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | SPENCER S. HSU, Times Staff Writer
Fifty years ago, Culver City witnessed a column of black smoke rising from 30 acres of burning movie lot props on city land and knew that the filming of an American cultural milestone had begun. City leaders hope to capture a sliver of the glamour as the Culver City Historical Society marks the golden anniversary of the production of "Gone With the Wind."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2008 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Factories, oil derricks and houses were sprouting all over Southern California in 1913 when Harry H. Culver outlined his plan for a city midway between Los Angeles and Abbot Kinney's seaside resort. "If you draw a straight line from [downtown's] Story building to the oceanfront at Venice," he told the gentlemen of the private California Club, "at the halfway mark you will find three intersecting electric lines -- the logical center for . . . a town site." His Culver Investment Co.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We came across a grove of very large (trees), high and thick, from which flows a stream. The banks were grassy and covered with fragrant herbs and watercress. . . . We pitched camp near the water." --Explorer Juan Crespi, observing La Ballona Creek, near present-day La Cienega Boulevard, in 1769 From its underground "headwaters" in the Mid-City district to its mouth in the Pacific Ocean near Marina del Rey, Ballona Creek is the most disparaged body of water in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1989 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Researcher
Los Angeles was the first city in the county to incorporate--in 1850--with Diamond Bar trailing 139 years later, to become the 86th city earlier this year. Many of the communities were carved out of the large ranchos that dominated the area in the early 19th Century. Here is how each community was named and the date of its incorporation. Agoura Hills (1982)--In 1924 the town was called Independent Acres, but the name was later changed to Picture City in honor of Paramount Picture Corp.
NEWS
June 3, 1985 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Thousand Oaks had 3,422 oaks at last count. An early government survey of Twentynine Palms found only 26 palms. It has been years since the seals frolicked on the sand at Seal Beach. No wonder the backers of a proposed city in San Diego County have been careful about coming up with a name. The North Coast Incorporation Coalition, representing the Encinitas-Leucadia-Cardiff-Olivenhain area, recently asked for suggestions from residents, offering $100 prizes for the top three selections.
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