Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarry Lechler
IN THE NEWS

Harry Lechler

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2000 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who owns a town's history? It's hard to say anymore in this farming enclave in eastern Ventura County. For 57 years, the undisputed keeper has been Harry Lechler, a lifelong resident and retired hardware store owner who built the Lechler Museum in his own backyard in 1943. But this weekend, the museum's 1,000-piece collection is up on the auction block. And residents are in a last-minute frenzy to try to keep the town's history intact.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2000 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who owns a town's history? It's hard to say anymore in this farming enclave in eastern Ventura County. For 57 years, the undisputed keeper has been Harry Lechler, a lifelong resident and retired hardware store owner who built the Lechler Museum in his own backyard in 1943. But this weekend, the museum's 1,000-piece collection is up on the auction block. And residents are in a last-minute frenzy to try to keep the town's history intact.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | CHRISTINA LIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he had done so often in younger days, Harry Lechler bent over a wooden Victrola, lifted the instrument's arm and slowly placed the needle onto a record. And as if he still were a young boy playing a song for his sweetheart, the 83-year-old man excitedly wound up the Victrola and listened as the voice of Bing Crosby filled the room. "If you want it loud, you keep both doors open," he said as he opened wide the doors of the wooden speaker. "If you want it low, you close the doors."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | CHRISTINA LIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he had done so often in younger days, Harry Lechler bent over a wooden Victrola, lifted the instrument's arm and slowly placed the needle onto a record. And as if he still were a young boy playing a song for his sweetheart, the 83-year-old man excitedly wound up the Victrola and listened as the voice of Bing Crosby filled the room. "If you want it loud, you keep both doors open," he said as he opened wide the doors of the wooden speaker. "If you want it low, you close the doors."
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt about it. These are uneasy days in the museum world. A Van Gogh sells for a record $82.5 million in New York, a Renoir for $78.1 million, and a judge in Ohio launches a search for obscenity in a collection of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs. In Piru, meanwhile, another cultural question rides the dry breeze: Who will take over the Harry H. Lechler Collection? "He's got family," a woman at the Piru General Store in Ventura County said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt about it. These are uneasy days in the museum world. A Van Gogh sells for a record $82.5 million in New York, a Renoir for $78.1 million, and a judge in Ohio launches a search for obscenity in a collection of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs. In Piru, meanwhile, another cultural question rides the dry breeze: Who will take over the Harry H. Lechler Collection? "He's got family," said a woman at the Piru General Store. "Or he could probably sell it or give it to a historical society.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | CHRISTINA LIMA
As he had done so often in younger days, Harry Lechler bent over a wooden Victrola, lifted the instrument's arm and slowly placed the needle on a record. And as if he still were a young boy playing a song for his sweetheart, the 83-year-old man excitedly wound up the Victrola and listened as the voice of Bing Crosby filled the room. "If you want it loud, you keep both doors open," he said as he opened wide the doors of the phonograph's acoustic horn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1991 | KATHLEEN WILLIAMS
HISTORY: The Lechler family settled in Piru Canyon in the 1860s. They farmed and later kept honeybees. Third-generation descendant Harry Hazard Lechler has always lived in Piru. He and his wife, Margaret, built the two-story stucco home when they married in 1937. The museum building was added in 1969, using their life savings. * LOCATION: 3886 Market St., two blocks from downtown Piru. * HOURS: Call 521-1595 for appointment. Admission is free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2000 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who owns a town's history? It's hard to say anymore in this farming enclave in eastern Ventura County. For 57 years, the undisputed keeper has been Harry Lechler, a lifelong resident and retired hardware store owner who built the Lechler Museum in his backyard in 1943. But this weekend, the museum's 1,000-piece collection is on the auction block. And area residents are attempting in a last-minute frenzy to keep the town's history intact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1990
The community of Piru is known for a man-made body of water almost universally called Lake PIE-ru . But as any Piru old-timer can tell you, that pronunciation is dead wrong. Mispronouncing Piru is such a popular pastime that most native sons and daughters have abandoned attempts to correct the error. The fact of the matter is simple enough: Piru, an agricultural community of 1,200 residents east of Fillmore, is properly called PEE -ru.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its 1950s heyday, folks here recall, the joint was hopping--weddings, baptisms, and dancing to the golden tones of local bands. Today, the Quonset hut, with its broken windows, dirty metal siding and chipped linoleum floors, is no longer the social hub of this tiny Ventura County community, having been replaced 10 years ago by the Piru Community Center.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|