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Harry Love

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1997
Harry Love, 85, animator whose career took him from "Krazy Kat" to "The Cat in the Hat." Love began his pioneering work in New York in 1929 for the Charles Mintz Studios, creator of the long-running "Krazy Kat" theater shorts. He moved to Los Angeles three years later with Mintz, which became Screen Gems Studios, and remained there for 16 more years as animator and director. Love later worked for Walt Disney, Warner Bros., Fritz Freleng and Hanna-Barbera. His work included Merrie Melodies cartoons featuring Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig, as well as "The Incredible Mr. Limpet," a feature-length movie that combined live action with animation, and "The Pink Panther."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Who in the world is Harry Love? His obscurity contrasts with the notoriety of the man he brought to justice, bandit and murderer Joaquin Murrieta. In 1853, Love organized California's first law enforcement agency, the California Rangers. They ambushed Murrieta and his gang in Fresno County, along what is now California 33. They cut off his head and took it with them to prove he was dead and collect a reward. Murrieta's legend survived the indignity.
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NEWS
March 8, 1997
Harry Love, 85, animator whose career took him from "Krazy Kat" to "The Cat in the Hat." Love began his pioneering work in New York in 1929 for the Charles Mintz Studios, creator of the long-running "Krazy Kat" theater shorts. He moved to Los Angeles three years later with Mintz, which became Screen Gems Studios, and remained there for 16 more years as animator and director. Love later worked for Walt Disney, Warner Bros., Fritz Freleng and Hanna-Barbera.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2000
What Barbara Harris ("Mom in the Middle," by Sharon Bernstein, May 14) is doing is one of the most courageous and intelligent acts I've seen in a long time. Instead of sitting on the edge of their seats expecting an ethnic slur at every turn, people should deal with reality. Diane Silver Via the Internet Dear Barbara Harris: As an African American, I admire you and love you. But I'm also angry at you for allowing a few media-seeking idiots such as Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Gene Collins and Rocio Cordoba to force you to make changes in your approach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Who in the world is Harry Love? His obscurity contrasts with the notoriety of the man he brought to justice, bandit and murderer Joaquin Murrieta. In 1853, Love organized California's first law enforcement agency, the California Rangers. They ambushed Murrieta and his gang in Fresno County, along what is now California 33. They cut off his head and took it with them to prove he was dead and collect a reward. Murrieta's legend survived the indignity.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2000
What Barbara Harris ("Mom in the Middle," by Sharon Bernstein, May 14) is doing is one of the most courageous and intelligent acts I've seen in a long time. Instead of sitting on the edge of their seats expecting an ethnic slur at every turn, people should deal with reality. Diane Silver Via the Internet Dear Barbara Harris: As an African American, I admire you and love you. But I'm also angry at you for allowing a few media-seeking idiots such as Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Gene Collins and Rocio Cordoba to force you to make changes in your approach.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the evening after a 116-degree day, pipes from the grandstand roof spray a cool mist over the fans. Mark Harris sits behind the third base dugout at Scottsdale Stadium. Harris--who wrote what many consider two of the finest baseball novels ever, "Bang the Drum Slowly" and "The Southpaw"--doesn't know the names of any players on the home team Phoenix Firebirds. He doesn't know how the team is doing this season. He talks little about the game until a great play gets his attention.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1988
It only takes an occasional reading of Harry (love those unions) Bernstein's labor column to remind me why unions have fallen into such disfavor in recent years. Bernstein's latest lament concerns the proposal to allow a 12-hour workday in our state. Nearly all of the other states already have such a provision, which allows workers to decide if they would prefer to work for three days and have four days off and miss rush hour drive-time. Never mind that the choice would be up to the worker and that it would also help alleviate everyone's rush hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2006 | Steve Harvey
"Where did you get your gun?" a friend asked Peggy Mollin at Roxbury Park in Beverly Hills. A park ranger, bicycling nearby, did a double take. But he seemed relieved when Mollin responded, "At the 99-Cent Store." Mollin and her friend are members of Adrienne Omansky's acting class for seniors, and were holding their Oktoberfest celebration. The performers were dressed as their favorite celebrities, and Mollin came as Annie Oakley. The class, by the way, is free. Information: (323) 900-3500.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1998 | MARK CHALON SMITH
In "Lucky Stiff," Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty's musical now at Cypress College, a corpse propped in a wheelchair is played for laughs over and over. That gives an idea of the show's sensibilities. Fans of the movie "Weekend at Bernie's," in which a dead man is lugged from one silly scenario to the next, may get a tickle out of "Lucky Stiff." Others should think twice. The jokey corpse isn't the only minus for the musical, an off-Broadway production of a few years back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1997
Harry Love, 85, animator whose career took him from "Krazy Kat" to "The Cat in the Hat." Love began his pioneering work in New York in 1929 for the Charles Mintz Studios, creator of the long-running "Krazy Kat" theater shorts. He moved to Los Angeles three years later with Mintz, which became Screen Gems Studios, and remained there for 16 more years as animator and director. Love later worked for Walt Disney, Warner Bros., Fritz Freleng and Hanna-Barbera. His work included Merrie Melodies cartoons featuring Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig, as well as "The Incredible Mr. Limpet," a feature-length movie that combined live action with animation, and "The Pink Panther."
NEWS
March 8, 1997
Harry Love, 85, animator whose career took him from "Krazy Kat" to "The Cat in the Hat." Love began his pioneering work in New York in 1929 for the Charles Mintz Studios, creator of the long-running "Krazy Kat" theater shorts. He moved to Los Angeles three years later with Mintz, which became Screen Gems Studios, and remained there for 16 more years as animator and director. Love later worked for Walt Disney, Warner Bros., Fritz Freleng and Hanna-Barbera.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the evening after a 116-degree day, pipes from the grandstand roof spray a cool mist over the fans. Mark Harris sits behind the third base dugout at Scottsdale Stadium. Harris--who wrote what many consider two of the finest baseball novels ever, "Bang the Drum Slowly" and "The Southpaw"--doesn't know the names of any players on the home team Phoenix Firebirds. He doesn't know how the team is doing this season. He talks little about the game until a great play gets his attention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2006 | Steve Harvey
Buddy, a 6-year-old runaway pooch, knew where to go after he was hit by a car in Bellflower: Kaiser Permanente hospital. "The dog walked through the emergency room's automatic doors and lay on the floor next to the waiting room area," said Aaron Reyes, director of operations for the Southeast Area Animal Control Authority. "The guards saw that he was limping and looked tired, so they called us right away." Buddy was treated at the animal agency by Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2007 | Steve Harvey
The March issue of the Thin Blue Line, an LAPD newspaper, relates what may hold up as the dumbest line of the year by a lawbreaker -- even though it was uttered early Jan. 1. A man suspected of ushering in 2007 with some ceremonial shotgun blasts told an officer: "I was just shooting it at the tree, sir. I wasn't shooting it into the air like everybody else." More stupid criminal tricks: Then there was the guy who was asked for his driver's license by police.
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