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Harry M Markowitz

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BUSINESS
October 17, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three American economists, including a Stanford University professor whose work helped lay the foundation for creation of mutual funds and advanced the understanding of financial markets, were jointly awarded the Nobel memorial prize in economics Tuesday. Professors William F. Sharpe of Stanford, Harry F. Markowitz of City University of New York and Merton H. Miller of the University of Chicago, will share in the $700,000 prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three American economists, including a Stanford University professor whose work helped lay the foundation for creation of mutual funds and advanced the understanding of financial markets, were jointly awarded the Nobel memorial prize in economics Tuesday. Professors William F. Sharpe of Stanford, Harry F. Markowitz of City University of New York and Merton H. Miller of the University of Chicago, will share in the $700,000 prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000
The University of California has been home to 43 Nobel Prize winners. Last week, three UC professors won prizes for chemistry, physics and economics. Here is a list of Nobel laureates. Berkeley *--* Laureate Year Field Ernest O. Lawrence 1939 Physics John H. Northrop 1946 Chemistry Wendell M. Stanley 1946 Chemistry William F. Giauque 1949 Chemistry Edwin M. McMillan 1951 Chemistry Glenn T. Seaborg 1951 Chemistry Emilio G. Segre 1959 Physics Owen Chamberlain* 1959 Physics Donald A.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A Soviet deputy foreign minister accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on Monday on behalf of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who said in a message from Moscow that the world is still threatened by aggression and totalitarianism. Gorbachev, the first Communist head of state to win the prize, had hoped to attend the ceremony in Norway in person, but he said that problems at home--including a food shortage, a collapsing economy and breakaway republics--now require his attention "hour by hour."
BUSINESS
October 16, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 81-year-old economist from the University of Chicago, whose Depression-era tour of American factories led him to discover that it costs money to bargain over any transaction, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics on Tuesday. The theories developed by British-born Ronald Coase, a professor emeritus at the university's law school, were described by the Nobel committee as the economic equivalent of discovering new particles of matter.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2006 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
A Columbia University economist was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics Monday for his paradigm-shifting work showing that reducing inflation wouldn't necessarily lead to higher unemployment -- a key tenet of Federal Reserve policy since the 1980s. Edmund S. Phelps, 73, who started his career at Santa Monica-based Rand Corp., was honored for his challenge to a post-World War II notion that low inflation and low unemployment couldn't exist simultaneously.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1992 Nobel Prize for economics has been awarded to Gary S. Becker, a University of Chicago professor who has used economic theory as a key to explore riddles about families, the work force, crime, discrimination and other social issues, the Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday. Becker, a professor of economics and sociology whose work was once shunned by the academic Establishment, was awarded the $1.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2005 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
Harry M. Markowitz won the Nobel Prize in economics as the father of "modern portfolio theory," the idea that people shouldn't put all of their eggs in one basket, but should diversify their investments. However, when it came to his own retirement investments, Markowitz practiced only a rudimentary version of what he preached. He split most of his money down the middle, put half in a stock fund and the other half in a conservative, low-interest investment.
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