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Harry Mcpherson

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December 4, 1988 | SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL, The Washington Post
Among the wise men of Washington, Harry McPherson is the best writer. Since Jan. 31, 1956, when he first drove to the capital from Texas to accept a job as a counsel to Senate Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson--a job he took without meeting the volcanic man--McPherson has been privy to many of the inner precincts. There are many volumes on the bonfire of Manhattan but few on the romance of low-rise Washington.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Harry C. McPherson Jr., who served as special counsel and chief speechwriter for President Lyndon Johnson from 1966 to '69 and was a valued advisor to the president on civil rights, the Vietnam War and other policy issues, has died. He was 82. McPherson, who later became a prominent Washington lawyer and lobbyist, died Feb. 16 of complications of cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., said Hedrick Smith, a family friend. "Harry McPherson was a 'can do' man with sound judgment and treasured loyalty who could be counted on by generations of Johnsons," Luci Baines Johnson, the president's youngest daughter, said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Harry C. McPherson Jr., who served as special counsel and chief speechwriter for President Lyndon Johnson from 1966 to '69 and was a valued advisor to the president on civil rights, the Vietnam War and other policy issues, has died. He was 82. McPherson, who later became a prominent Washington lawyer and lobbyist, died Feb. 16 of complications of cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., said Hedrick Smith, a family friend. "Harry McPherson was a 'can do' man with sound judgment and treasured loyalty who could be counted on by generations of Johnsons," Luci Baines Johnson, the president's youngest daughter, said in a statement.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL, The Washington Post
Among the wise men of Washington, Harry McPherson is the best writer. Since Jan. 31, 1956, when he first drove to the capital from Texas to accept a job as a counsel to Senate Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson--a job he took without meeting the volcanic man--McPherson has been privy to many of the inner precincts. There are many volumes on the bonfire of Manhattan but few on the romance of low-rise Washington.
NEWS
January 4, 1986 | BARRY HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
In what UC San Diego Chancellor Richard C. Atkinson describes as a "historically significant" event, the chiefs of staff of six U.S. Presidents will discuss the inner workings of the White House and their role in shaping the nation's history later this month at a symposium at UCSD. Entitled "25 Years of the Presidency," the Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1986 | BARRY HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
In what UC San Diego Chancellor Richard C. Atkinson describes as a "historically significant" event, the chiefs of staff of six U.S. presidents will discuss the inner workings of the White House and their role in shaping the nation's history later this month at a symposium at UCSD. Entitled "25 Years of the Presidency," the Jan.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top U.S. tobacco companies have hired a pair of powerhouse Washington law firms in what may be a prelude to an attempted global settlement of the industry's mounting legal and regulatory problems. Industry officials confirmed Tuesday that they have retained Verner, Liipfert, Bernhard, McPherson & Hand, and Barbour, Griffith & Rogers, for advice on resolving the multibillion-dollar tobacco litigation. The companies hiring the firms--cigarette makers Philip Morris, R.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1988 | ROSS K. BAKER, Ross K. Baker is professor of political science at Rutgers University
In a country with a strong political party system, you would not have the spectacle of an Al Gore belittling the credentials of front-runners when he himself is so far behind. He would be bundled off to the woodshed by party leaders and informed bluntly that he would be cut off from his money and organizational support. That's the way it is today in Britain, and how it used to be in this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1986 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
A two-day seminar of top advisers to former American Presidents ended Saturday with sponsors saying the discussions will help provide future Presidents with a blueprint for managing their administrations. The unprecedented summit meeting of key presidential advisers, representing administrations from Dwight D. Eisenhower through Jimmy Carter, gathered at University of California, San Diego, as part of the university's 25th anniversary celebration.
NEWS
April 21, 1985 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Probably not since the siege of the Alamo has Texas seen such an assemblage of beleaguered underdogs as the liberal notables who gathered here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the launching of Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society. With Ronald Reagan riding high in the White House, public opinion appears to have repudiated the faith in government's problem-solving ability that generated the Great Society's effort to redress social and economic inequities.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leading cigarette maker Philip Morris said Tuesday that it might enter into closed-door negotiations aimed at reaching a sweeping settlement of the legal and regulatory problems that have engulfed the tobacco industry. The announcement, contained in Philip Morris' annual 10K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, was the most concrete statement yet of the firm's interest in buying peace with government and private lawyers pursuing multibillion-dollar claims against the industry.
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