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Harry Oppenheimer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Harry Oppenheimer, the billionaire South African businessman who led the world's largest diamond and gold mining companies for a quarter of a century and spoke out against apartheid, has died. He was 91. Oppenheimer died Saturday night in a Johannesburg hospital where he was admitted Friday with a severe headache and abdominal pains. The cause of death was unclear. As chairman of diamond giant De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Harry Oppenheimer, the billionaire South African businessman who led the world's largest diamond and gold mining companies for a quarter of a century and spoke out against apartheid, has died. He was 91. Oppenheimer died Saturday night in a Johannesburg hospital where he was admitted Friday with a severe headache and abdominal pains. The cause of death was unclear. As chairman of diamond giant De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd.
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NEWS
July 9, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story is told here of a top executive of a subsidiary of the giant Anglo American Corp. who stood up at a board meeting and asked, "Gentlemen, which one of you wants this company to be remembered as the IG Farben of apartheid?" The reference to the industrial engine of Nazi Germany was a telling one. For no corporation dominates its national economy the way Anglo American does. And no company has as much at stake in moving this country out of the era of apartheid.
NEWS
July 9, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story is told here of a top executive of a subsidiary of the giant Anglo American Corp. who stood up at a board meeting and asked, "Gentlemen, which one of you wants this company to be remembered as the IG Farben of apartheid?" The reference to the industrial engine of Nazi Germany was a telling one. For no corporation dominates its national economy the way Anglo American does. And no company has as much at stake in moving this country out of the era of apartheid.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1989
Minorco Controls 55% of Consolidated: South African-backed Minorco claimed control of almost 55% of mining giant Consolidated Gold Fields PLC, moving closer to clinching Britain's largest corporate takeover. But Cons Gold vowed to keep fighting the $6-billion hostile bid, which Minerals & Resources Corp. first launched in September. Luxembourg-based Minorco, the investment arm of South African Harry Oppenheimer's gold and diamond empire, said it had obtained control of at least 54.8% of Cons Gold.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1988 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Minorco dropped its $4.9-billion hostile bid for Consolidated Gold Fields on Tuesday after the British government said it would investigate the deal's effect on the market for strategic metals, mainly titanium and zircon. The government referred the bid by South African-controlled Minorco to its Monopolies and Mergers Commission, a move that delays the deal while the commission takes three months or more to review the matter.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1989 | From Reuters
British industrial conglomerate Hanson PLC on Thursday announced a $4.8-billion bid for the battle-scarred British mining giant, Consolidated Gold Fields PLC, which just recently won a long battle to stay independent. Consolidated Gold quickly labeled the Hanson offer as inadequate. But analysts said they expect Hanson to win the mining concern eventually with a sweetened offer. Hanson, with interests ranging from building materials to food retailing, said its offer amounted to a cash payment of $22.31 per share for all of Consolidated Gold's common stock.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Lord Hanson, the tycoon who is about to clinch the biggest deal in British corporate history, is expected to move slowly to restructure mining group Consolidated Gold Fields PLC, industry analysts said Wednesday. After 10 days of hard bargaining, Hanson PLC on Tuesday agreed to pay $5.5 billion (3.5 billion pounds) for Cons Gold, founded more than a century ago by British empire builder Cecil Rhodes. Both companies' shareholders are expected to endorse the agreement.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1989 | From Reuters
Less than six weeks after fending off a hostile bid from Minorco, Consolidated Gold Fields PLC agreed Tuesday to a $5.5-billion merger, the biggest in British history, with industrial conglomerate Hanson PLC. Hanson, one of the most predatory companies on the British scene, said Cons Gold had agreed to be acquired for $24.17 a share, most of it cash. On June 22, Hanson offered $22.59 a share in cash for Cons Gold, but the mining concern turned the bid down as inadequate.
NEWS
July 25, 1986 | From Reuters
President Kenneth D. Kaunda publicly lectured Britain's foreign secretary Thursday night, accusing him and President Reagan of "kissing" South African apartheid. The Zambian leader told visiting Foreign Secretary Geoffrey Howe: "As a fellow human being, Sir Geoffrey, I must welcome you. But as a messenger of what you have come to do in South Africa, you are not welcome at all."
BOOKS
September 12, 1993 | Samuel G. Freedman, Samuel G. Freedman, the author of "Small Victories," and "Upon This Rock," writes frequently about South African literature.
There is a photograph I recall from the mid-1980s, a grainy, wire-service shot from an airport in Zambia. It showed a group of white men, clad in business suits and carrying briefcases, walking abashedly across the Tarmac to a reception committee of blacks. The visitors were a delegation of South African industrialists, come to seek diplomatic dialogue, if not quite separate peace, with the exiled and outlawed African National Congress. Which, I wondered in the aftermath, was the more shocking?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Are we ready for this? Thirteen plays from the '50s and '60s, undiluted, unupdated, unmolested? This writer is. A look back enhances looking ahead. And Edward Parone, who conceived and produced "50/60 Vision" at the Mark Taper Forum has been picky about which ones to include. The first three--Harold Pinter's "The Collection" and Samuel Beckett's "Play" and "Krapp's Last Tape"--kicked off the event at a press preview Tuesday, attended by an enthusiastic but smallish audience.
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