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Harry S Ashmore

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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is such a political animal as a radical moderate, Harry S. Ashmore may fit the bill. If there isn't, then maybe he can't be pigeonholed at all--which would be fine with him. For nearly half a century, Ashmore, 73, has promoted the virtues of reason and dialogue in this country's acrimonious and sometimes bloody battles over civil rights and social justice. But he also believes in rooting out inequity, however uncomfortable that may make the entrenched social order.
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NEWS
May 25, 1994 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fires of Watts in 1965, like those of South-Central in 1992, were the beacon of a certain painful but insistent truth: Crime in the streets of America is merely the symptom of a much deeper social and economic malaise that we ignore at our own terrible risk. What is needed to cure the ailment, argues Harry S. Ashmore in "Civil Rights and Wrongs," is "a firm commitment to massive social reform," a commitment articulated and embraced long ago by a nation that had declared a "war on poverty."
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NEWS
May 25, 1994 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fires of Watts in 1965, like those of South-Central in 1992, were the beacon of a certain painful but insistent truth: Crime in the streets of America is merely the symptom of a much deeper social and economic malaise that we ignore at our own terrible risk. What is needed to cure the ailment, argues Harry S. Ashmore in "Civil Rights and Wrongs," is "a firm commitment to massive social reform," a commitment articulated and embraced long ago by a nation that had declared a "war on poverty."
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is such a political animal as a radical moderate, Harry S. Ashmore may fit the bill. If there isn't, then maybe he can't be pigeonholed at all--which would be fine with him. For nearly half a century, Ashmore, 73, has promoted the virtues of reason and dialogue in this country's acrimonious and sometimes bloody battles over civil rights and social justice. But he also believes in rooting out inequity, however uncomfortable that may make the entrenched social order.
BOOKS
December 24, 1989 | Frank B. Gibney, Gibney is president of the Pacific Basin Institute in Santa Barbara
Robert Maynard Hutchins was one of those larger-than-life men of vision about whom Americans like to boast in retrospect, but who in life receive more than their share of misunderstanding, criticism and indeed vituperation from their fellow-citizens. Hutchins, to be sure, gave at least as good as he got. His long and extraordinarily distinguished career as one of America's great educators began at age 24 as secretary of the Yale Corp.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry S. Ashmore, civil rights writer who won a Pulitzer Prize for his editorials on desegregating Little Rock's Central High School 40 years ago, has died at the age of 81. Ashmore, a resident of Santa Barbara since 1960, died in a nursing home there Tuesday from complications of a stroke he suffered Jan. 9. Rooted in a Southern family, Ashmore was editor of the now-defunct Arkansas Gazette in 1957 when Arkansas Gov. Orval E.
OPINION
March 24, 1991 | Robert Shogan, Robert Shogan covers politics for The Times. This article is adapted from his new book, "The Riddle of Power: Presidential Leadership from Truman to Bush" (Dutton).
President George Bush must turn from the Persian Gulf euphoria to focus on thorny domestic issues. The nation's civil-rights constituencies are preparing for a major battle over legislation the Administration slid into public view the week the ground war ended. Many civil-rights questions Bush faces today could have been eased considerably had one of his most popular Republican predecessors, Dwight D. Eisenhower, handled issues on the home front as deftly as he led troops into battle.
NEWS
May 16, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Theodore H. White, the owl-faced, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and historian who dramatically changed the look of American political reporting with his popular "The Making of the President" books, died late Thursday at New York City's Lenox Hill Hospital after suffering a stroke. He was 71. White, according to friends, appeared to be in good health and was involved in writing projects up until last Friday, when he collapsed at his upper East Side Manhattan residence.
BOOKS
December 24, 1989 | Frank B. Gibney, Gibney is president of the Pacific Basin Institute in Santa Barbara
Robert Maynard Hutchins was one of those larger-than-life men of vision about whom Americans like to boast in retrospect, but who in life receive more than their share of misunderstanding, criticism and indeed vituperation from their fellow-citizens. Hutchins, to be sure, gave at least as good as he got. His long and extraordinarily distinguished career as one of America's great educators began at age 24 as secretary of the Yale Corp.
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