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Harry Sternberg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Harry Sternberg, a prominent artist and teacher who began his life in a New York tenement and shaped his vision during the Great Depression, has died. He was 97. A resident of Escondido for 35 years, he had been ill for some time and died Tuesday of pneumonia at Palomar Hospital in San Diego. Sternberg was known as an artist with a tough, Works Progress Administration-era sensibility, but he produced a considerable range of emotionally expressive work during his long career.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Harry Sternberg, a prominent artist and teacher who began his life in a New York tenement and shaped his vision during the Great Depression, has died. He was 97. A resident of Escondido for 35 years, he had been ill for some time and died Tuesday of pneumonia at Palomar Hospital in San Diego. Sternberg was known as an artist with a tough, Works Progress Administration-era sensibility, but he produced a considerable range of emotionally expressive work during his long career.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warm winds of nostalgia and religious heritage blow through the Harry Sternberg retrospective at the Platt Gallery at the University of Judaism. Sternberg, 91, came of age during the Great Depression. He devoted much of his art to the civic landscape, depicting the social fabric of the times.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warm winds of nostalgia and religious heritage blow through the Harry Sternberg retrospective at the Platt Gallery at the University of Judaism. Sternberg, 91, came of age during the Great Depression. He devoted much of his art to the civic landscape, depicting the social fabric of the times.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is an art writer based in San Diego.
"Don't be polite with me," Harry Sternberg admonishes shortly into the interview, and he means it. The 90-year-old artist's bluntness--and that of his work--is legendary. Responding to Sternberg's first solo show of prints and drawings in 1932, a New York Times critic warned viewers not to look to the artist's work for charm or delicacy, but rather for "strength and truculence."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The art world rarely has a shortage of grand gestures masquerading as grand ideas. But modest gestures that embody rich ideas and profound meaning always seem in short supply. Harry Sternberg's latest body of work fits comfortably into the latter category. It is a simple visual journal, but it is also the epic tale of a life committed to art, family, spiritual growth and social change.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | ELAINE POFELDT
The show opening Saturday at the downtown exhibition space of the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art reveals a sense of humor in its social commentary. Hanging from a chrome frame in one corner of the gallery at 838 G St. is a pair of ears placed, as if on a head, along a strip of wood. Titled "Eavesdropping," the sculpture by Casey McLoughlin takes a quirky look at the decline of privacy in modern life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN
The art world rarely has a shortage of grand gestures masquerading as grand ideas. But modest gestures that embody rich ideas and profound meaning always seem in short supply. Harry Sternberg's latest body of work fits comfortably into the latter category. It is a simple visual journal, but it is also the epic tale of a life committed to art, family, spiritual growth and social change.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2000 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every year in late October, Eloy Tarcisio travels from his home and studio in Mexico City to the California Center for the Arts here, where he ropes off a field of small square plots in the museum's gravel courtyard. On Nov. 1, residents from the area gather in the courtyard to celebrate the Day of the Dead by making offerings in honor of their loved ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is an art writer based in San Diego.
"Don't be polite with me," Harry Sternberg admonishes shortly into the interview, and he means it. The 90-year-old artist's bluntness--and that of his work--is legendary. Responding to Sternberg's first solo show of prints and drawings in 1932, a New York Times critic warned viewers not to look to the artist's work for charm or delicacy, but rather for "strength and truculence."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The art world rarely has a shortage of grand gestures masquerading as grand ideas. But modest gestures that embody rich ideas and profound meaning always seem in short supply. Harry Sternberg's latest body of work fits comfortably into the latter category. It is a simple visual journal, but it is also the epic tale of a life committed to art, family, spiritual growth and social change.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1988 | LEAH OLLMAN
Since the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art mounted "A San Diego Exhibition: 42 Emerging Artists" in 1985, tongues have wagged over the question of who was in and who was not. With "Civilians," the museum's latest dip into the pool of local talent, more controversy is bound to be stirred up by the man who chose the artists than by the choices themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1988 | LEAH OLLMAN
In the shadow of Horton Plaza, supermarket of the slick, stands a small establishment quietly perpetuating a dying art. In its unpretentious devotion to quality and craft, Brighton Press seems, all too sadly, of a different time and place. One of only a dozen small presses in the country making artists' prints and handmade books, it holds its ground with earnestness and integrity, a precious island in the mighty flood of mass-produced, throwaway consumer goods.
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