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Harry Wolf

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997
Re "Gehry, Fund-Raisers Face Showdown on Disney Hall," June 5: As someone said to me recently, construction is a process where you begin and something goes wrong, and then something else goes wrong and later some more things go wrong. After awhile other things go wrong, and then it's over! Creation is a patient search; it is a never-ending voyage of discovery. Like life it is a messy process where wise decisions lead to great vitality and bad ones result in, at best, a compromised existence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997
Re "Gehry, Fund-Raisers Face Showdown on Disney Hall," June 5: As someone said to me recently, construction is a process where you begin and something goes wrong, and then something else goes wrong and later some more things go wrong. After awhile other things go wrong, and then it's over! Creation is a patient search; it is a never-ending voyage of discovery. Like life it is a messy process where wise decisions lead to great vitality and bad ones result in, at best, a compromised existence.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
Harry L. Wolf, a veteran cinematographer and the last of the cameramen who filmed "Gone With the Wind." Wolf, who was believed to be in his 80s, was director of photography for more than 600 TV productions and served four terms as president of the American Society of Cinematographers. His feature films include "The Young in Heart" and "Duel in the Sun," while his television series include "Hennessy," "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "Baretta."
NEWS
November 14, 1993
Harry L. Wolf, a veteran cinematographer and the last of the cameramen who filmed "Gone With the Wind." Wolf, who was believed to be in his 80s, was director of photography for more than 600 TV productions and served four terms as president of the American Society of Cinematographers. His feature films include "The Young in Heart" and "Duel in the Sun," while his television series include "Hennessy," "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "Baretta."
REAL ESTATE
November 17, 1991
Los Angeles architect Harry Wolf of Wolf+ is the recipient of a 1991 Award for Architectural Excellence given by the Florida chapter of the American Institute of Architects for his design of the NCNB National Bank in Tampa.
REAL ESTATE
February 28, 1993
Harry Wolf of Wolf Architects, Los Angeles, is the recipient of the 1993 National Honor Award of the American Society of Architects for his design of NationsBank Plaza Building, a 33-story, limestone cylinder in Tampa, Fla. This is the fifth National Honor Award for Wolf, an architect who began his practice in North Carolina, moved to New York and five years ago to Los Angeles.
REAL ESTATE
March 28, 1993
Harry Wolf of Wolf Architects, Los Angeles, is the recipient of the 1993 National Honor Award of the American Society of Architects for his design of Nations Bank Plaza Building, a 33-story, limestone cylinder in Tampa, Fla. This is the fifth National Honor Award for Wolf, an architect who began his practice in North Carolina, moved to New York and five years ago to Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2001
Re "There's a New Buzz on Hollywood Blvd.," Nov. 8: Now that we have a world-class shopping and entertainment center in the heart of Hollywood, how about shutting down traffic on Hollywood Boulevard between Vine and La Brea between 5 p.m. and 2 a.m. every day (or at least on weekends) and letting horse-drawn carts and bicycle taxis take care of visitors? Has anyone offered this idea to the Hollywood redevelopment planners? San Diego, San Francisco and others have it; how about Hollywood?
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
George Folsey, a motion picture industry office boy at age 14 and a cameraman at 19 who retired six decades later with 13 Academy Award nominations and one Emmy for his photographic labors, is dead at the age of 90. Folsey, who was behind the camera for such memorable films as "The White Cliffs of Dover," "Green Dolphin Street," "Meet Me in St. Louis," "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" and "Executive Suite," died Tuesday at St. John's Medical Center in Santa Monica.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
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