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BUSINESS
May 29, 1987
Arthur A. Hartman, former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, has been elected to the board of Hartford Fire Insurance Co., the principal subsidiary of Hartford Insurance Group, Hartford, Conn.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether the insurance industry can be forced to pay damages for allegedly conspiring to limit some types of liability coverage. A ruling in the case, due early next year, could shake up the insurance industry. If the justices were to side with attorneys from California and 18 other states, the major insurers could face enormous damage claims.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether the insurance industry can be forced to pay damages for allegedly conspiring to limit some types of liability coverage. A ruling in the case, due early next year, could shake up the insurance industry. If the justices were to side with attorneys from California and 18 other states, the major insurers could face enormous damage claims.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1987
Arthur A. Hartman, former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, has been elected to the board of Hartford Fire Insurance Co., the principal subsidiary of Hartford Insurance Group, Hartford, Conn.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 1989
Hartford Fire Insurance Co. has signed a 10-year, 10-month lease valued at more than $7 million for 25,000 square feet of space in Wilshire Courtyard, 5757 Wilshire Blvd. The Wilshire office of Coldwell Banker represented Hartford in the transaction, while Clifford Goldstein represented the J.H. Snyder Co., developer of the 1-million-square-foot office building.
NEWS
April 1, 1988
A Texas horse trader pleaded guilty in San Diego federal court to conspiracy to defraud an insurance company in a scheme in which eight horses were driven off a cliff so death benefits could be collected on the animals. Bobby Griffin, 45, of Lufkin, Tex., faces sentencing May 23 for plotting to defraud Hartford Fire Insurance Co., which insured the horses for $81,000. A second defendant, Leonard Keith Autterson, 48, of Lakeside, pleaded guilty to the same charge. Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1989
A 53-year-old man pleaded guilty Monday to mail fraud in connection with the slaughter of eight horses that were driven off a cliff in Jacumba in order to collect insurance on them. Raymond Paul of Keyes in Stanislaus County was indicted by a federal grand jury a year ago along with five others. He entered his plea before U.S. District Judge J. Lawrence Irving. Assistant U.S. Atty. Bill Hayes said Paul faces a maximum five-year sentence in federal prison and a fine of $250,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1988
A Lakeside man who admitted driving eight horses to their deaths off a cliff pleaded guilty Thursday to conspiring to defraud an insurance company that insured the horses. Leonard Keith Autterson, 48, faces a maximum term of five years in federal prison and a fine of $250,000, but a prosecutor said he will recommend a sentence of probation. Assistant U.S. Atty.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court Tuesday reinstated a suit by 19 states, including California, accusing major insurance companies of conspiring to limit liability coverage and drive up rates for businesses and government agencies in the mid-1980s. In San Francisco, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 3-0 that the alleged agreement among insurers, reinsurance firms and trade organizations would amount to a boycott against those who wanted broader coverage.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission are broadening their enforcement of antitrust laws over international activity. The two agencies, which share enforcement of the laws, issued guidelines Wednesday for international enforcement. "Anti-competitive conduct that affects U.S. domestic or foreign commerce may violate the U.S. antitrust laws regardless of where such conduct occurs or the nationality of the parties involved," the new guidelines state. The guidelines take a broader view of antitrust jurisdiction over imports than the 1988 guidelines they replace and reflect a 1993 Supreme Court decision in Hartford Fire Insurance Co. vs. California.
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