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BUSINESS
November 30, 1992 | Ted Johnson
It is a common cry: With so many environmental regulations, how can anyone do business anymore? But like it or not, the guidelines to curb everything from spray-can emissions to paint disposal are here to stay. So says Harvey Hartman, chairman of a Newport Beach consulting firm that instructs companies on how to comply at the lowest possible cost. Yet that's only half the job. Hartman says that to gain an edge on competitors, firms have to stay ahead of the regulators.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 1992 | Ted Johnson
It is a common cry: With so many environmental regulations, how can anyone do business anymore? But like it or not, the guidelines to curb everything from spray-can emissions to paint disposal are here to stay. So says Harvey Hartman, chairman of a Newport Beach consulting firm that instructs companies on how to comply at the lowest possible cost. Yet that's only half the job. Hartman says that to gain an edge on competitors, firms have to stay ahead of the regulators.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Position: President of the Hartman Group, Newport Beach. Birth date: Oct. 31, 1946. Residence: Newport Beach. Education: Bachelor degrees in commerce and finance and in English from St. Louis University. Business philosophy: "We believe we can assist in making change and making a difference in the environment, which I believe is an important social cause. At the same time, we believe we can do it in a very pro-business, proactive way."
BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Position: President of the Hartman Group, Newport Beach. Birth date: Oct. 31, 1946. Residence: Newport Beach. Education: Bachelor degrees in commerce and finance and in English from St. Louis University. Business philosophy: "We believe we can assist in making change and making a difference in the environment, which I believe is an important social cause. At the same time, we believe we can do it in a very pro-business, proactive way."
HEALTH
March 27, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Love fries but hate the thought of artery-clogging fried food? A growing number of gourmet restaurants and foodies see a solution to this conundrum in an unlikely source ? duck fat. They consider it a healthy alternative to frying foods in pork fat, beef fat or even butter. Duck fat is high in beneficial unsaturated fats, and its chemical composition is closer to olive oil than to butter, they say. Plus, it's delicious. "I love it," said David Bazirgan, executive chef at the Fifth Floor restaurant in San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
People want to be more environmentally sensitive when they go to the store, especially if their children are along to nag them, marketing surveys show. In a telephone survey of 1,006 adults last October, 70% told the Hartman Environmental Report that their environmental concern had increased in the past two years. And 67% said their environmental activities had increased. The number of people who said they would switch brands to get a recyclable container went from 54% in 1988 to 80% in 1990.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The "green" marketing movement--still in its infancy--is turning brown. Battered by recession-ravaged consumers and confusion over environmental product claims, marketers who embraced the environment as the great sales tool of the decade are discovering that instead of saving the Earth, more consumers today are concerned with saving a few cents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1992 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Children's concerns about the environment are beginning to show up in their parents' shopping baskets, and the marketplace smells the blossoming of a new trend. To cultivate favor with young conservationists, businesses are using recycled products, forming alliances with environmental groups, and trying to understand children like never before. After children wrote in telling the company to save trees, Archie Comics in Mamaroneck, N.Y.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
Children's concerns about the environment are beginning to show up in their parents' shopping baskets, and the marketplace smells the blossoming of a new trend. To cultivate favor with young conservationists, businesses are using recycled products, forming alliances with environmental groups and trying to understand young people like never before. Archie Comics in Mamaroneck, N.Y.
HEALTH
June 25, 2001 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Many of the 40 million to 50 million Americans who take vitamin C tablets swallowed hard last week upon hearing the news that chemists had found a link between high doses of the supplements and the kind of DNA damage associated with cancer. But researchers who study the vitamin's effect on health were quick to say that the new findings did not imply that vitamin C supplements cause cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Art and commerce, under the guises of TV programming and corporate sponsorship, have been crossing paths for years. From the black-and-white days of "Kraft Television Theatre" to the crafty product placements in series ever since, the two have sustained each other in a synergistic dance of necessity.
FOOD
May 4, 2005 | Max Withers, Special to The Times
Shoppers swarm around the farmers market stall. After the rainy California winter, strawberries, peas and fava beans, those heralds of spring, are hot sellers. Some customers move in for the kill, brandishing their trophy produce in one hand and exact change in the other. Others hold back, trying to remember what looked good at the last stall. Weren't those favas a little smaller? But these favas say "pesticide-free." And the guy at the other end of the market might have organic ones.
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