Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHartwell Corp
IN THE NEWS

Hartwell Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | DENIENE HUSTED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mary Eatman started working for the Hartwell Corp. in 1940, when the company was just a year old and had but six employees. It was fate, she said, that brought her to that small office on Second Street in Los Angeles. The young woman from Gadsden, Ala., was hired through an agency as a temp to process billings with a Comptometer--a precursor to the adding machine--and never left. Hartwell was her first and only, employer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | DENIENE HUSTED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mary Eatman started working for the Hartwell Corp. in 1940, when the company was just a year old and had but six employees. It was fate, she said, that brought her to that small office on Second Street in Los Angeles. The young woman from Gadsden, Ala., was hired through an agency as a temp to process billings with a Comptometer--a precursor to the adding machine--and never left. Hartwell was her first and only, employer.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 12, 1997
Hartwell Corp., a 58-year-old manufacturer of civilian and military aircraft components, said Friday that it has been acquired by Western Sky Industries in Philadelphia. Financial details were not disclosed. Conrad Maas, Hartwell's new president, said the company will remain in Orange County and will continue operating under its own name as a unit of Western Sky. Hartwell, which moved to Orange County in 1972, makes latches, hinges and struts used in aircraft construction.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1997
Hartwell Corp., a 58-year-old manufacturer of civilian and military aircraft components, said Friday that it has been acquired by Western Sky Industries in Philadelphia. Financial details were not disclosed. Conrad Maas, Hartwell's new president, said the company will remain in Orange County and will continue operating under its own name as a unit of Western Sky. Hartwell, which moved to Orange County in 1972, makes latches, hinges and struts used in aircraft construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
More than 20 years after contamination was found in the vast San Gabriel Valley ground-water basin, a judge Thursday approved an accord to provide $250 million to restore water quality. The San Gabriel Basin Watermaster, an agency established by the courts to resolve the problem, said Aerojet GenCorp., Azusa Land Reclamation Co. Inc., Fairchild Holding Corp., Hartwell Corp., Huffy Corp., Oil and Solvent Processing Co., Reichhold Inc. and Wynn Oil Co.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parker Bertea Aerospace will lay off 41 people on Friday as a result of cancellation of a Navy fighter plane and slowdown in orders for some commercial programs, a company spokeswoman said Tuesday. In addition, 19 employees have been transferred to new jobs and 29 others have voluntarily resigned, either by taking early retirement or finding other jobs. The reductions represent about 3% of the company's 3,000-employee Irvine work force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aerojet General Corp. and six other companies that allegedly contributed to the San Gabriel Valley ground water pollution agreed Friday to resume negotiations with local water producers over cleaning up the aquifer, while paying $4.1 million in preliminary costs, officials said. "Up to now, there had been a lot of talk and not much action," Bob Kuhn of the San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority said in a press release. "We have made a significant breakthrough." The $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2002 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two decades after the discovery of dangerous chemicals in the San Gabriel Valley's drinking water, eight of the companies held responsible agreed Monday to pay for the $250 million cleanup. The tentative settlement reached by attorneys for the companies and water suppliers with the help of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides for construction and operation of six plants to clean up contaminated water beneath Azusa, Irwindale and Baldwin Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1995 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has named 16 companies it considers responsible for cleaning up the most heavily polluted ground water in the San Gabriel Valley--a job that is projected to cost more than $100 million.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's glamour enough for everybody these days--even designers of medical devices. Five Southern California companies were winners in the first nationwide contest earlier this month to award designs that enhance health care and save costs. Morphix Design in Newport Beach and Hartwell Medical Corp. in Carlsbad were co-winners for a device used to safely transplant patients in an emergency from the scene of trauma to the hospital.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1986 | JEFF ROWE, Jeff Rowe is a free-lance writer
Nearly 1,000 makers of electronic production, testing and packaging equipment are showing off their latest wares today at Nepcon West 86, the final day of a three-day exhibition and conference devoted to anything and everything related to printed circuit boards and electronic assemblies. The exhibitors have filled all three halls at the Anaheim Convention Center and spilled over into four temporary dome buildings outside.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2000
Lisa Glatch has been named senior vice president of human resources and administration for Fluor Corp. in Aliso Viejo. She succeeds Frederick J. Grigsby Jr., who resigned. Glatch was formerly a senior executive with Jacobs Engineering in Long Beach, where she oversaw West Coast operations. Before that, she was with Fluor for 13 years in a variety of management posts, including top aide to the chief operating officer of Fluor Daniel and vice president of Global Automation for Fluor Daniel.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|