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Hartz Mountain Corp

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BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | From Reuters
Pet Products Inc. said Sunday that it accepted an increased offer by Hartz Mountain Corp. to buy the company in a deal worth about $16 million. The new offer, for $5.25 per share in cash, is $1 a share above Hartz's previous offer of $4.25, which was worth about $13 million. Wilbur Ross, Pet's financial adviser, said Pet insiders holding about a third of the shares of the maker of pet accessories and supplies had agreed to tender their shares to Hartz, which serves a similar market.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Sumitomo Corp., Japan's fourth-largest trading company, agreed to buy U.S. pet-supplies maker Hartz Mountain for $365 million to create a global pet-care business. Sumitomo and its U.S. unit agreed to buy all the shares outstanding in JWC Hartz Holdings. The U.S. unit will be the majority owner. Hartz Mountain is based in Secaucus, N.J. Americans spent $32.4 billion on their pets in 2003, including $22.2 million for food and supplies, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Assn.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Sumitomo Corp., Japan's fourth-largest trading company, agreed to buy U.S. pet-supplies maker Hartz Mountain for $365 million to create a global pet-care business. Sumitomo and its U.S. unit agreed to buy all the shares outstanding in JWC Hartz Holdings. The U.S. unit will be the majority owner. Hartz Mountain is based in Secaucus, N.J. Americans spent $32.4 billion on their pets in 2003, including $22.2 million for food and supplies, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Assn.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | From Reuters
Pet Products Inc. said Sunday that it accepted an increased offer by Hartz Mountain Corp. to buy the company in a deal worth about $16 million. The new offer, for $5.25 per share in cash, is $1 a share above Hartz's previous offer of $4.25, which was worth about $13 million. Wilbur Ross, Pet's financial adviser, said Pet insiders holding about a third of the shares of the maker of pet accessories and supplies had agreed to tender their shares to Hartz, which serves a similar market.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2001 | Reuters
Staff attorneys at the Federal Trade Commission have recommended the agency approve Nestle's plan to acquire Ralston Purina Co. as long as the companies divest themselves of some dry cat-food brands, a source familiar with the case said. The companies have agreed to sell part of their dry cat-food business to Hartz Mountain Corp., which is owned by investment firm J.W. Childs Associates, according to the source. A vote on the deal could come as early as next week.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2001
* The Federal Trade Commission cleared Nestle's purchase of Ralston Purina Co. to create the world's largest pet food company after the firms agreed to divest two cat food brands to preserve competition. The FTC voted 4 to 0 to let the $10.1-billion deal proceed, with the two companies promising to sell Meow Mix and Alley Cat dry cat food brands to Hartz Mountain Corp., a unit of investment firm J.W. Childs Associates. * Computer Sciences Corp.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OC Weekly, a new weekly tabloid, will make its debut in September, promising extensive coverage of Orange County's culture, politics and lifestyles. The weekly newspaper will be a sister publication to LA Weekly and the Village Voice in New York. The Los Angeles and New York papers are owned by New York-based Stern Publishing, a subsidiary of Harrison, N.J.-based Hartz Mountain Corp. The new tabloid is expected to compete against OC Metro, a weekly publication, as well as daily newspapers.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2005 | From Reuters
In a defeat for New York Atty. Gen. Eliot Spitzer, former Bank of America Corp. broker Theodore Sihpol was acquitted Thursday by a Manhattan jury of 29 counts of helping a hedge fund trade mutual funds illegally. New York Supreme Court Justice James Yates declared a mistrial on four other counts on which the jury deadlocked. Lawyers said the verdict might erode some of Spitzer's clout as the financial services industry's most prominent crime fighter.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1996 | DAVID DISHNEAU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the early days, catnip wasn't just a job for Leon Seidman; it was an adventure. He'd get up at dawn in search of the potent weed along railroad tracks, swatting at bees and wading through poison ivy with hedge clippers attached to a motorcycle battery on his belt. "We'd go cut the stuff and put it in trucks and bring it back in and explain to the police every day it wasn't dope," Seidman said. "That was an adventure all by itself. "I'd have to stop and think 'Am I in a movie? Is this real?'
BUSINESS
June 22, 1985 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Tough-talking Leonard N. Stern has always been happy to be thought of as the hardest of hard-nosed businessmen. In negotiations, he quibbles over pennies despite his multimillion-dollar fortune, and assaults on competitors by his Hartz Mountain Industries are fabled. His goal has always been the bottom line.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
Don't tell anyone, but we have fleas. Indicative of the trouble in Los Angeles this year is the complaint of Montebello veterinarian O.W. Estafanous. "We never had a worse problem," he said. "We used to spray the dog once a week and he'd be OK. Now we are spraying the dog more often and we have a worse problem." But veterinarians and researchers have a message for pet owners: Not to worry, they say. Most of the commercial remedies--the dips, powders, bombs and shampoos--will make a flea flee.
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