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Haruki Murakami

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February 6, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Be careful what you write -- even in fiction. Town leaders in Nakatonbetsu, Japan, are up in arms about a short story by Haruki Murakami. They say the story "Drive my car -- men without women" insults their town. And, they told the AFP , they plan to demand an explanation from Murakami, one of the nation's leading authors. The story was published in the December issue of the Japanese magazine Bungeishunju. In it, a widowed middle-aged man is traveling in a car being driven by a young woman.  The driver flips a lighted cigarette out her window, and the man thinks, "Probably this is something everyone in Nakatonbetsu commonly does.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Be careful what you write -- even in fiction. Town leaders in Nakatonbetsu, Japan, are up in arms about a short story by Haruki Murakami. They say the story "Drive my car -- men without women" insults their town. And, they told the AFP , they plan to demand an explanation from Murakami, one of the nation's leading authors. The story was published in the December issue of the Japanese magazine Bungeishunju. In it, a widowed middle-aged man is traveling in a car being driven by a young woman.  The driver flips a lighted cigarette out her window, and the man thinks, "Probably this is something everyone in Nakatonbetsu commonly does.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Haruki Murakami book that has sold 1 million copies a week in Japan is coming to America. It has been selling spectacularly -- particularly for a work of complex literary fiction. Publisher Knopf told Galleycat that U.S. readers can expect to get their hands on an English-language edition of Murakami's latest novel in 2014. Spanish readers, however, are first in line: Their edition is coming out this year. "Shikisai wo Motanai Tasaki Tsukuru to Kare no Junrei no Toshi," was published in Japan in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
"The Apartment," Greg Baxter's absorbing, atmospheric and enigmatic first novel, unfolds in extended paragraphs without chapter breaks on a single snowy mid-December day in a fictional European city that evokes aspects of Vienna, Prague and Budapest. Its long, frigid journey into a long, sleepless night explores a man's uneasy relationship with his past, himself and a world in which violence is inescapable. The book's unnamed 41-year-old narrator is a retired U.S. Navy submariner who has served two tours providing intelligence in Iraq - the first as a reservist, the second as a private contractor identifying insurgents for the Iraqi police, which made him a fortune.
BOOKS
April 4, 1993 | David L. Ulin, Ulin is the author of "Cape Code Blues" (Red Dust), a book of poems, and book editor of the Los Angeles Reader
For better or worse, we live today in an atmosphere of cultural cross-pollination, where words and images are transmitted across continents at the speed of television, and the writing of one society can influence the writers of another until the idea of boundaries becomes nearly irrelevant. In some circles, it's fashionable to lament this process, to see it as responsible for a kind of mass homogenization that will ultimately render all of us, no matter where we live, as mostly the same.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By Haruki Murakami , Translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel, Alfred A. Knopf,210 pages, $23 A Haruki Murakami novel is like the David Hockney painting of a swimming pool into which someone has just dived, fallen or been pushed. The colors are warm, the details realistic. The scene has an inviting transparency--no other contemporary Japanese novelist other than Murakami seems easier for the Western reader to enjoy. Yet there's a mystery at the center of it.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Edward Champion, Edward Champion, a San Francisco writer, hosts the literary blog Return of the Reluctant, www.edrants.com.
THE title of Haruki Murakami's latest novel may connote the smoke-hewn, jazz-strewn flow of Hugh Hefner's old television show. But the book's post-midnight Tokyo is a lonely place where the trains have stopped running and the love hotels and the family restaurants are sanctuaries for the loners and the sad sacks stuck working graveyard.
BOOKS
October 15, 1989 | Foumiko Kometani, Kometani is a free-lance writer. and
I remember an afternoon picnic in Bel-Air that a motion-picture executive gave to honor the visit of my husband. He warmly welcomed my two sons standing beside me. Then, as if I were not there at all, he stepped forward to greet the next incoming guests, ignoring me completely, assuming automatically that any non-Caucasian accompanying children to their home was an au pair or a nanny, hardly an invited guest.
BOOKS
September 15, 1991 | RICHARD EDER
What we conquer comes back to ruin us. World War II pointed up the irony. Defeated by the industrial and technological power of the United States, Japan absorbed its lessons and rose to an industrial and technological proficiency that, if it hasn't conquered our economy, threatens important parts of it. But in real life, ironies, like happy endings, have no real end. They have to get up and go to work the next day.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Japanese writer Haruki Murakami has never witnessed a tsunami. But he has imagined one. In his 1988 short story "The Seventh Man," Murakami's narrator is a man damaged by the childhood memory of watching his best friend sucked away by a killer wave, the furious sea retreating, he wrote, as if "a gigantic rug had been yanked by someone at the other end of the earth." A stream of fiction has come from Murakami since that story.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Like many writers, I've imagined myself working in (or owning) a bookstore. On Saturday, for two highly enjoyable hours, I finally got the chance. It was the first-ever Indies First Day, with hundreds of authors across the United States working at independent bookstores in honor of Small Business Saturday. I put in a two-hour shift at Vroman's in Pasadena, donning the green apron real Vroman's employees wear, and answering tough questions like: “Where is the children's section?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Very few writers lend themselves to being covered ... in the pop music sense of the word. The idea seems almost contradictory: How, after all, are we to rework a poem or a story, give it an interpretive spin? And yet, there is always Franz Kafka , whose writing continues to provide not just inspiration but also source material for a wide array of work. This week, I've encountered two such projects: David Zain Mairowitz and Jaromir 99's graphic novel of “The Castle” (SelfMadeHero: 144 pp., $19.95 paper)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The next winner of the biennial Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the prestigious literary award often called the “American Nobel,” will be announced Friday night in Oklahoma. The prize, sponsored by the University of Oklahoma and the journal World Literature Today , includes a check for $50,000 and a silver eagle feather. Winners include Nobel laureates Gabriel Garcia Marquez (who won in the Neustadt in 1972, a full a decade before his 1982 Nobel win), Czeslaw Milosz (Neustadt 1978, Nobel 1980)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
The next winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature will be announced Thursday morning in Stockholm. In the United Kingdom, where you can wager on such things, the betting money is on Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. As of Monday morning, the Ladbrokes betting site has the author of the “Wind-Up Bird Chronicle” and “1Q84” as a five-to-two favorite to win. Over at the Boston Globe, Chris Wright points out that the British bookies making these odds probably haven't read most of the authors listed along with Murakami as potential favorites.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Who thinks Japanese writer Haruki Murakami will win the Nobel Prize in literature? British bettors do. British betting house Ladbrokes has Murakami as this year's favorite for the Nobel Prize in literature. The author of such books as "1Q84," "Norwegian Wood," "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" and next year's "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage" is frequently thought of as a top contender . In 2012, the Guardian called him the frontrunner , but he lost out to Chinese author Mo Yan, who was a new name in Ladbrokes' list that year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Haruki Murakami book that has sold 1 million copies a week in Japan is coming to America. It has been selling spectacularly -- particularly for a work of complex literary fiction. Publisher Knopf told Galleycat that U.S. readers can expect to get their hands on an English-language edition of Murakami's latest novel in 2014. Spanish readers, however, are first in line: Their edition is coming out this year. "Shikisai wo Motanai Tasaki Tsukuru to Kare no Junrei no Toshi," was published in Japan in April.
BOOKS
July 27, 2008 | Peter Terzian, Peter Terzian is editing an anthology of essays about beloved record albums.
How MANY athletic activities are as well-suited to the writing life as long-distance running? It's cheap, for one -- writers are notoriously poor, and all you need to run is a good pair of sneakers. In a 1999 essay for the New York Times, Joyce Carol Oates drew a parallel between the tireless walker-writers of the 19th century (Coleridge, Dickens, Whitman) and the contemplative present-day jogger. "In running," she wrote, "the mysterious efflorescence of language seems to pulse in the brain."
NEWS
January 24, 1994 | MICHAEL HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This Japanese novel is like a boxcar rumbling all alone down the tracks. It's a big, bright boxcar, loaded with good stuff--mystery, mysticism, sex and rock 'n' roll--but we can't see the engine that has to be pulling it, or the caboose that has to be trailing behind. In fact, "Dance, Dance, Dance" is a sequel to Haruki Murakami's 1982 novel "Wild Sheep Chase." The rather slow beginning of the new story recapitulates the ending of the earlier one.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
The IMPAC Dublin Literary Award announced its shortlist for 2013 on Tuesday, and a refreshingly diverse group it is, with five novels in translation -- from Japan, Iceland, Norway, the Netherlands, and France -- listed along with one British, one Irish and three American novels.  The prize, which carries a pot of more than $150,000, is the most valuable one in the world. Shortlisted titles this year include Karen Russell's "Swamplandia" (which was also a finalist for the Pulitzer last year)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Haruki Murakami tends to stay out of the public eye. The author of the novels "1Q84," "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle," the memoir "What I Talk About When I Talk About Running," and a dozen other books has not made a public appearance in his home country, Japan, in almost two decades. That will change in May, when Murakami is scheduled to appear as part of a seminar in Kyoto. It's the kickoff for a new literary prize named in honor of the late Hayao Kawai, a clinical psychologist who was an old friend of Murakami, AFP reports.
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