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Harvard Bioscience Inc

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BUSINESS
April 11, 2001
* Harvard Bioscience Inc. may continue to use its name despite the objections of Harvard University, a federal judge has decided. In denying the university's request for a preliminary injunction to bar the company's use of the name, U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns directed the company to avoid using the Harvard name in the crimson color or in a font similar to that used by the university. Shares of Harvard Bioscience, based in Holliston, Mass., rose 15 cents to close at $6.05 on Nasdaq.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2001
* Harvard Bioscience Inc. may continue to use its name despite the objections of Harvard University, a federal judge has decided. In denying the university's request for a preliminary injunction to bar the company's use of the name, U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns directed the company to avoid using the Harvard name in the crimson color or in a font similar to that used by the university. Shares of Harvard Bioscience, based in Holliston, Mass., rose 15 cents to close at $6.05 on Nasdaq.
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BUSINESS
December 7, 2000 | Times Staff, Reuters
Harvard Bioscience Inc. on Wednesday priced its initial public offering at $8 a share, below the $9 to $10 range it hoped to get. The biotech stock will begin trading today under the symbol HBIO on Nasdaq. . . . For the second time in recent years, traders at the Chicago Board of Trade tossed out the incumbent chairman by a narrow margin in favor of a new leader.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2000 | Times Staff, Reuters
Harvard Bioscience Inc. on Wednesday priced its initial public offering at $8 a share, below the $9 to $10 range it hoped to get. The biotech stock will begin trading today under the symbol HBIO on Nasdaq. . . . For the second time in recent years, traders at the Chicago Board of Trade tossed out the incumbent chairman by a narrow margin in favor of a new leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Oxford Gene Technology Ltd., a British biotechnology company, accused five California rivals and two other companies of infringing a patent for DNA sequencing that can help cure diseases and improve crops. Named in lawsuits by Oxford are BD Biosciences Clontech of Palo Alto; Nanogen Inc. of San Diego; Axon Instruments Inc. of Union City; Biodiscovery Inc. of Marina del Rey; and Mergen Ltd. of San Leandro. Oxford also sued PerkinElmer Life Sciences Inc. of Boston and Harvard Bioscience Inc.
HEALTH
July 9, 2011 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Andemariam Teklesenbet Beyene left a Stockholm hospital Friday, breathing through a manufactured trachea that was built with his own stem cells. The 36-year-old Eritrean geology student at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik had suffered from an advanced case of tracheal cancer, and tumors were threatening to block his windpipe and choke off his supply of oxygen before the artificial trachea was implanted June 9. Dr. Paolo Macchiarini of Karolinska University Hospital decided there was no time to wait for a donor trachea, so he assembled a team to build one. Since the artificial trachea was made with Beyene's own cells, he hasn't needed anti-rejection drugs that would have suppressed his immune system and made him vulnerable to other infections.
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