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BUSINESS
September 30, 1990 | DAVID W. EWING, DAVID W. EWING, who served on the Harvard Business School faculty for nearly 40 years, is author of the new book, "Inside the Harvard Business School." He now is a full-time writer
The Harvard Business School, with its elegant 61-acre campus and 55,000 graduates, has been dubbed the "cathedral of management" and the "West Point of capitalism." People with MBAs from Harvard are in the news every day, and in business and government they wield enormous power. At a time when industry is striving for excellence, the B school stresses higher standards of "quality control" in teaching than almost any other educational institution in the world.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By James Barragan
President Obama intends to nominate Maria Contreras-Sweet, the founder of a Latino-owned community bank in Los Angeles and a former state Cabinet secretary, to head the Small Business Administration. Contreras-Sweet, who is highly regarded in the L.A. business community, is expected to be nominated Wednesday afternoon. She would fill the last vacancy in Obama's Cabinet. Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Contreras-Sweet immigrated to Los Angeles when she was 5. She was the first Latina to serve as a Cabinet secretary in California when she was secretary of the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency from 1999 to 2003.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 1988 | United Press International
The Harvard Business School said Tuesday that it will require its first-year students to take a course in ethics, a move designed to send a signal that fairness and honesty are critical components of business. Harvard has offered ethics as an elective for years, and officials said ethical questions ordinarily are discussed in many courses. But they said it is time to make sure no students are "squeezed out" of ethics training.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Jason Abbruzzese
I recently said goodbye to an old friend that had been with me since I was about 12 years old: my worn-down, blue-and-yellow Blockbuster video rental card. There are few better examples of how the entertainment business has actually changed (as opposed to various romantic theories about how it could develop) than the decline of this once culturally important institution. The downfall of Blockbuster was held by many experts to portend the fate of traditional media business models that relied on the other kind of blockbuster - those big, bloated mass-entertainment creations that had become a mainstay of the industry.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You're an Australian manufacturing expert. You've been parachuted into your company's money-losing sock factory in China. You don't speak Chinese, the factory's computer data has been wiped clean, and you are so swamped with technical problems that you can't get any sleep. What to do? This is the kind of case study Harvard Business School students have been presented with for years.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | Tim Anderson, A year ago in a City Times Voices column, Tim Anderson of South-Central talked about heading to Harvard Business School (where 6,000 apply and 800 are accepted), his plans to bring businesses to his community and his ultimate goal: to become President of the United States. With just half a year left at Harvard, Anderson, 28, still has plans to bring business to South-Central, but the presidency will have to wait. Some things, Anderson has learned, are not always as simple--or as important--as they once seemed. Anderson was interviewed by Laurie K. Schenden
I think what I've learned at Harvard Business School is that I need to build a strong foundation. Without my family, I couldn't do that. Being away from home, I learned to appreciate them more. They're the ones I've come to depend on. The competition at Harvard is very intense. I get up at 7 a.m. and go to sleep at 2 a.m. I was physically, emotionally and mentally drained by the end of the first semester.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Andrew Hill
Clayton Christensen achieves the difficult feat of being at once imposing and humble. When I visited him last autumn at Harvard Business School, he laid out with quiet authority his latest thoughts on disruptive technology, the concept that justly made him famous in the mid-1990s. But he also took time to chat about his son's college basketball team, a poster of which hangs on one wall of an office full of family photos and memorabilia. Although he places great value on his family and faith — he is a devout Mormon — his research and teaching have dominated his public story.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Harvard Business School said it was rejecting applications from 119 would-be students it accused of hacking into a website to learn if they were accepted. "This behavior is unethical at best -- a serious breach of trust that cannot be countered by rationalization," said Kim Clark, dean of Harvard Business School.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
The gig: As founder and chief executive of Sunrise Co., William Bone has been developing master-planned golf-course communities in Palm Springs and other resort areas since the early 1970s. The company has built 13 resort communities and constructed more than 14,000 homes, two resort hotels and several office buildings, shopping centers and hotels. A seed is planted: Bone's interest in construction grew from working in his teens for his father's material salvage business. When he was an undergraduate at Stanford University, he interned for a home builder.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1990
In many ways David Ewing's commentary, "Even Harvard Business School Has a Downside" (Sept. 30), based on his recently published book, "Inside the Harvard Business School," was fair in its critique. Nevertheless, I found the article profoundly disturbing. If there is one thing we are taught here at HBS, it is that the right decision is not always the easy decision. It is sometimes easier to make a profit by polluting the environment; easier to cut costs by underpaying and mistreating employees, and easier to accumulate cash by bending a few rules or regulations.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Moules
This is a good time to be an entrepreneur. As the global economy has teetered on the edge of collapse, and former pillars of society from bankers to politicians have become mired in scandal, business founders have been lionized across the world as the saviors of capitalism and a source of hope for the future. The general interest in the subject means that it is also a good time to be writing a book about entrepreneurship. Daniel Isenberg is the latest to do this with what he regards as an alternative look at the subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Andrew Brimmer, the son of a Louisiana sharecropper who in 1966 became the first black member of the Federal Reserve Board, has died. He was 86. Brimmer died Oct. 7 at a Washington hospital after a lengthy illness, said his daughter, Esther Brimmer. An economist, Brimmer held a doctorate from Harvard Business School and several high-ranking positions in Washington. He worked as a staff economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and as an economics professor before being named a deputy assistant secretary of commerce under President John F. Kennedy.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
The gig: As founder and chief executive of Sunrise Co., William Bone has been developing master-planned golf-course communities in Palm Springs and other resort areas since the early 1970s. The company has built 13 resort communities and constructed more than 14,000 homes, two resort hotels and several office buildings, shopping centers and hotels. A seed is planted: Bone's interest in construction grew from working in his teens for his father's material salvage business. When he was an undergraduate at Stanford University, he interned for a home builder.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Andrew Hill
Clayton Christensen achieves the difficult feat of being at once imposing and humble. When I visited him last autumn at Harvard Business School, he laid out with quiet authority his latest thoughts on disruptive technology, the concept that justly made him famous in the mid-1990s. But he also took time to chat about his son's college basketball team, a poster of which hangs on one wall of an office full of family photos and memorabilia. Although he places great value on his family and faith — he is a devout Mormon — his research and teaching have dominated his public story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2010
Meg Whitman Party: Republican Occupation: Former chief executive, EBay online auction business Age: 53, born Long Island, New York City of residence: Atherton (Bay Area) Personal: husband Griffith Harsh, two sons Education: Bachelor's degree in economics, Princeton University; MBA, Harvard Business School Career highlights: Executive positions at several companies, including senior vice president at Walt Disney Co., 1989-1992; president, Stride Rite Division, Stride Rite Corp.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Biotechnology company Amgen Inc. said Rebecca Henderson had been appointed to its board of directors. Henderson, 48, recently became a professor at Harvard Business School. She has been a director at Idexx Laboratories Inc. since 2003. Her appointment expands the size of Thousand Oaks-based Amgen's board to 13.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Biotechnology company Amgen Inc. said Rebecca Henderson had been appointed to its board of directors. Henderson, 48, recently became a professor at Harvard Business School. She has been a director at Idexx Laboratories Inc. since 2003. Her appointment expands the size of Thousand Oaks-based Amgen's board to 13.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1985
Thanks, Coke. Thanks for allowing me to be in the audience to witness the most monumental publicity stunt in U.S. history. In just a few years, the Harvard Business School will be using your master plan as a paragon of how to generate billions of dollars worth of free publicity while introducing a new product. Naturally, it will be called "a classic case." JOSEPH H. FREDERICKSON Riverside
BUSINESS
December 14, 2007 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The gig: Founder and chief marketing officer of Angie's List, a home improvement directory that combines business listings with consumer reviews. Education: Bachelor's in economics, DePauw University; master's, Harvard Business School. First job: Sold popcorn and hot dogs at the Fort Wayne Children's Zoo in Indiana at age 16. Salary: $4 an hour. Got the idea: When her friend Bill Oesterle had trouble finding a contractor for his home, the pair figured there should be a better way for consumers to share information.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2007 | Stefan Stern, Financial Times
Let us now give praise to the officials at City Hall in Albuquerque, who in many ways are the inspiration behind this entertaining new book. A few years ago, managers of refuse collection in that city were facing a knotty problem. The garbage trucks were taking too long to complete their rounds, creating a huge overtime bill. But those officials were not stupid. They knew all about the power of incentives to motivate employees. Emboldened by this knowledge, they hit upon a brilliant plan.
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