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NEWS
March 12, 1990 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barack Obama stares silently at a wall of fading black-and-white photographs in the muggy second-floor offices of the Harvard Law Review. He lingers over one row of solemn faces, his predecessors of 40 years ago. All are men. All are dressed in dark-colored suits and ties. All are white. It is a sobering moment for Obama, 28, who in February became the first black to be elected president in the 102-year history of the prestigious student-run law journal.
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OPINION
September 30, 2008
Re "McCain resurrects an old stunt," Opinion, Sept. 26 Most of Sen. John McCain's campaign for president has featured the kind of political stunts that Matt Welch cites in his Times Op-Ed article. It's clear that McCain's most recent stunt backfired on him, because he did participate in the first presidential debate even though no bailout agreement had been reached. Suspicions about his real reason for attempting to escape the debate and find sanctuary in Washington linger. McCain, who is behind in the polls, cannot have thought he would do well in these debates, which pit a man who graduated second to last in his Naval Academy class of nearly 900 midshipmen against a man who graduated at the top of his Harvard Law class, taught constitutional law and was president of the Harvard Law Review.
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NATIONAL
January 27, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano and David G. Savage, Times Staff Writers
Barack Obama's entry into politics came on a winter morning at the white-columned Harvard Law Review building when, about 2 a.m., a deeply divided editorial staff chose him as the first African American to lead the prestigious publication. It was no small accomplishment. Obama, who at nearly 30 was older and more world-wise than most of his classmates, had to navigate among sharply drawn factions of conservatives and liberals to beat 18 other candidates for the job.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano and David G. Savage, Times Staff Writers
Barack Obama's entry into politics came on a winter morning at the white-columned Harvard Law Review building when, about 2 a.m., a deeply divided editorial staff chose him as the first African American to lead the prestigious publication. It was no small accomplishment. Obama, who at nearly 30 was older and more world-wise than most of his classmates, had to navigate among sharply drawn factions of conservatives and liberals to beat 18 other candidates for the job.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Charles H. Houston. For most Americans, the name doesn't ring a bell. For African Americans who know their history, however, Houston belongs in the same pantheon as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.. "The Road to Brown" (at 8 tonight on Channel 50, at 9 on Channel 24, at 10 on Channel 28) doesn't delve into the causes of Houston's strange obscurity.
OPINION
September 30, 2008
Re "McCain resurrects an old stunt," Opinion, Sept. 26 Most of Sen. John McCain's campaign for president has featured the kind of political stunts that Matt Welch cites in his Times Op-Ed article. It's clear that McCain's most recent stunt backfired on him, because he did participate in the first presidential debate even though no bailout agreement had been reached. Suspicions about his real reason for attempting to escape the debate and find sanctuary in Washington linger. McCain, who is behind in the polls, cannot have thought he would do well in these debates, which pit a man who graduated second to last in his Naval Academy class of nearly 900 midshipmen against a man who graduated at the top of his Harvard Law class, taught constitutional law and was president of the Harvard Law Review.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1989
Bravo! to the column "Johnny Reb Waves a Tale of Slavery: If Flags Means So Much, Stifle Displays of Confederate Banners," by Jamin Raskin, a former assistant attorney general of Massachusetts, and editor of the Harvard Law Review (Op-Ed Page, July 12). As an American with an Irish maternal grandfather, paternal grandmother of American Indian heritage, as well as a good mixture of African American blood, I find the numerous displays of the Confederate flag in our society not only a personal insult, but a treacherous disloyalty to the families and men who fought and died in the Civil War. Why is this symbolism of contempt for the United States, and our government, allowed to remain a "freedom" as it were?
NEWS
October 9, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis named Susan R. Estrich as his new campaign manager Thursday. She moves up from the position of deputy campaign manager, which she had held since March, 1987, to replace John Sasso. Sasso resigned from the campaign last week after admitting that he had distributed a so-called "attack video" on the speech-making practices of a rival Democratic candidate, Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1988
Oliphant's article draws the often forgotten but crucial distinction between a college education and a degree in literate competency. As a former high school and college debater, many of my evenings and weekends were spent reading works as diverse as the Harvard Law Review to Richard Price's "The Wanderers." Such reading not only enlarged my knowledge of facts and events, but instilled a capacity for understanding why such events occur and how this information applies to life in general.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2010 | By Katherine Skiba
If Cook County, Ill., had its druthers, President Obama would be showing up for jury duty today. But court officials were told several weeks ago the prospect was a no-go, a White House official said Sunday. The summons arrived at the president's Chicago home. Obama, a 1991 graduate of Harvard Law School, president of the Harvard Law Review and later a professor at the University of Chicago Law School, would have been bound for the courthouse in suburban Bridgeview had he not been otherwise occupied.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Charles H. Houston. For most Americans, the name doesn't ring a bell. For African Americans who know their history, however, Houston belongs in the same pantheon as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.. "The Road to Brown" (at 8 tonight on Channel 50, at 9 on Channel 24, at 10 on Channel 28) doesn't delve into the causes of Houston's strange obscurity.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barack Obama stares silently at a wall of fading black-and-white photographs in the muggy second-floor offices of the Harvard Law Review. He lingers over one row of solemn faces, his predecessors of 40 years ago. All are men. All are dressed in dark-colored suits and ties. All are white. It is a sobering moment for Obama, 28, who in February became the first black to be elected president in the 102-year history of the prestigious student-run law journal.
NEWS
March 30, 1990
As the parent of an interracial child, I found Barack Obama an extreme example of the way society casts individuals into unquestioned sociopolitical classifications based upon skin tone ("Barack Obama's Law, " March 12). Here we have a person born of two races whose parents are citizens of Kenya and the United States, who grew up in Hawaii and Indonesia, and yet he finds himself at the age of 28 funneled and filtered into a category called "black" in an article that I imagine was intended to profile his achievements.
OPINION
November 2, 2008
Re "Confessions from the campaign trail," Column One, Oct. 28 Your reporter covering the Obama campaign bemoaned the candidate's failure to "loosen up." What did he want? A confession about his struggle to fit into his Hawaiian high school? An intimate sharing of how he wooed Michelle? His preferred shaving lotion? Beer? Barack Obama didn't get where he is today by being everybody's favorite drinking buddy. He didn't become the first black editor of the Harvard Law Review by letting it all hang out. He got where he is through watchful listening and measured actions.
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