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NATIONAL
April 10, 2010
Three front-runners to fill the Supreme Court seat to be vacated by retiring John Paul Stevens are distinguished not just by their legal credentials but by qualities designed to appeal to particular political constituencies. One of them, Diane Wood, has strong appeal for liberals. The other two, Elena Kagan and Merrick Garland, could attract support across a wider political spectrum. Here in brief are what makes them likely choices: Aside from her intellect and academic credentials, Elena Kagan may be best known as the liberal whom many conservatives like.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bernard D. Meltzer, 92, a labor law scholar who helped draft the charter of the United Nations and served as a prosecutor at the Nuremberg war crime trials after World War II, died Thursday at home in Chicago, according to the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. A cause of death was not given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010
Tom Campbell Political party: Republican Occupation: Visiting professor of law, Chapman University School of Law Age: 57, born in Chicago City of residence: Irvine Personal: wife Susanne, no children Education: B.A., M.A., PhD. degrees in economics, University of Chicago. Law degree, Harvard Law School. Career highlights: Professor, Stanford Law School, 1983-88. U.S. House of Representatives, 1989-93 and 1995-2001.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2012 | By Morgan Little and Connie Stewart
A future president sits shirtless in his rent-controlled Manhattan apartment working the New York Times crossword while his girlfriend looks on, an emotional barrier separating him from those close to him. He is unsure of his future path in life but certain that it will be one he builds himself. That's the portrait David Maraniss paints of a young Barack Obama in an upcoming biography, "Barack Obama: The Story," which is excerpted in Vanity Fair. The biography ends as Obama heads to Harvard Law School, but the excerpt is mostly about Obama's early love life.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1986 | Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Charles E. Wyzanski Jr., a champion of civil liberties known for his controversial rulings on conscientious objectors and the Vietnam War, has died at age 80. Wyzanski, who suffered a cerebral hemorrhage Sunday and died Wednesday, was appointed to the federal bench in 1941 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was 35 at the time, one of the youngest men ever appointed to the post. As senior judge from 1971 until his death, Wyzanski sat in U.S.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
When a Supreme Court seat first came open last year, Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe offered some candid advice to one of his former students ? President Obama. Tribe was enthusiastic about Elena Kagan, but not the other front-runner, then- Judge Sonia Sotomayor. Her impact within the court "would be negative," Tribe told Obama in a letter on May 4, 2009. "Bluntly put, she's not nearly as smart as she seems to think she is, and her reputation for being something of a bully could well make her liberal impulses backfire and simply add to the Roberts/Alito/Scalia/Thomas wing of the court," Tribe wrote, referring to four conservative justices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Julius A. "Jud" Leetham, a former Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who served as chairman of the county Republican Central Committee in the 1960s, has died. He was 90. Leetham, a longtime resident of San Marino and Pasadena, died Aug. 16 at a Walnut Creek nursing facility from complications of a stroke he suffered about two months ago, said his son, William C. Leetham. Julius Leetham had moved to Walnut Creek, in the East Bay Area, several years ago. Appointed to the Superior Court in 1969 by Gov. Ronald Reagan, Leetham served on the court for nearly 20 years, including two as the supervising judge of the criminal courts in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989 | From Times Wires Services
Law students at USC, UCLA and other schools throughout California and the nation held rallies Thursday to protest what they said is a lack of minorities on law school faculties. About 100 USC law students gathered in front of the school's Law Center on Thursday to encourage increased recruitment of minority faculty there and nationwide. The law school's full-time faculty of 39 includes eight white women and one black man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991
It seems to me that Harvard Law School professor McDowell is guilty of the same obfuscation he ascribes to those on both sides of the abortion issue. Of course the Supreme Court will not justify any decision affecting abortion rights on the individual justice's perceived morality of abortion. And, in my view, neither will the court's decisions derive from constitutional "principles of . . . federalism and separation of powers" as McDowell asserts. It seems clear to me that any right a woman has to implement her own private decision regarding abortion comes directly from our Constitution.
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