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NATIONAL
April 10, 2010
Three front-runners to fill the Supreme Court seat to be vacated by retiring John Paul Stevens are distinguished not just by their legal credentials but by qualities designed to appeal to particular political constituencies. One of them, Diane Wood, has strong appeal for liberals. The other two, Elena Kagan and Merrick Garland, could attract support across a wider political spectrum. Here in brief are what makes them likely choices: Aside from her intellect and academic credentials, Elena Kagan may be best known as the liberal whom many conservatives like.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bernard D. Meltzer, 92, a labor law scholar who helped draft the charter of the United Nations and served as a prosecutor at the Nuremberg war crime trials after World War II, died Thursday at home in Chicago, according to the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. A cause of death was not given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
Wendy Davis, the long shot Democratic candidate for Texas governor, deserves all the scrutiny she is getting for blurring some facts in her compelling life story. When she got divorced, how long she lived as a single mother in a trailer, whether she was remarried and financially comfortable when she went off to Harvard Law School are not minor points in a narrative built on overcoming hardship. Politicians, whatever their party, must be held to the highest standard of truth, so it's entirely fair to rap her for overstating the adverse conditions of her life in order to make her climb to success sound more dramatic.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
When a Supreme Court seat first came open last year, Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe offered some candid advice to one of his former students ? President Obama. Tribe was enthusiastic about Elena Kagan, but not the other front-runner, then- Judge Sonia Sotomayor. Her impact within the court "would be negative," Tribe told Obama in a letter on May 4, 2009. "Bluntly put, she's not nearly as smart as she seems to think she is, and her reputation for being something of a bully could well make her liberal impulses backfire and simply add to the Roberts/Alito/Scalia/Thomas wing of the court," Tribe wrote, referring to four conservative justices.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY
A 37-year-old law professor at UCLA has won a $50,000 grant to study East Asian attitudes on patents, trademarks and copyrights--an area of law known collectively as intellectual property--and how such attitudes affect U.S. businesses competing in world markets. The scholarly work is intended to provide down-to-earth guidance on transacting day-to-day business, but it isn't being paid for by a university or a nonprofit organization. Instead, the means for Professor William P.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2010 | By David G. Savage and James Oliphant, Tribune Washington Bureau
A controversy over military recruiting at Harvard Law School while Elena Kagan was dean may say less about her views on the military than it does about her strong belief in equal rights for gays and lesbians, one of the foremost unsettled issues before the Supreme Court. In a series of memos to the faculty and students, Kagan described the military's policy of excluding openly gay men and women as "a profound wrong — a moral injustice of the first order." "It is a wrong that tears at the fabric of our own community because some of our members cannot, while others can, devote their professional careers to their country," she wrote in 2003, shortly after becoming dean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989 | From Times Wires Services
Law students at USC, UCLA and other schools throughout California and the nation held rallies Thursday to protest what they said is a lack of minorities on law school faculties. About 100 USC law students gathered in front of the school's Law Center on Thursday to encourage increased recruitment of minority faculty there and nationwide. The law school's full-time faculty of 39 includes eight white women and one black man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991
It seems to me that Harvard Law School professor McDowell is guilty of the same obfuscation he ascribes to those on both sides of the abortion issue. Of course the Supreme Court will not justify any decision affecting abortion rights on the individual justice's perceived morality of abortion. And, in my view, neither will the court's decisions derive from constitutional "principles of . . . federalism and separation of powers" as McDowell asserts. It seems clear to me that any right a woman has to implement her own private decision regarding abortion comes directly from our Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000
William Clements Warren, 91, a former dean of Columbia University Law School who helped transform the institution into a modern school. Warren is credited with improving the school's scholarship offerings and building a more diversified student body during his tenure as dean from 1952 to 1970. He also led the planning efforts for the school's main building.
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