Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarvard Law School
IN THE NEWS

Harvard Law School

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bernard D. Meltzer, 92, a labor law scholar who helped draft the charter of the United Nations and served as a prosecutor at the Nuremberg war crime trials after World War II, died Thursday at home in Chicago, according to the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. A cause of death was not given.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
October 31, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
When a Supreme Court seat first came open last year, Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe offered some candid advice to one of his former students ? President Obama. Tribe was enthusiastic about Elena Kagan, but not the other front-runner, then- Judge Sonia Sotomayor. Her impact within the court "would be negative," Tribe told Obama in a letter on May 4, 2009. "Bluntly put, she's not nearly as smart as she seems to think she is, and her reputation for being something of a bully could well make her liberal impulses backfire and simply add to the Roberts/Alito/Scalia/Thomas wing of the court," Tribe wrote, referring to four conservative justices.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1986 | Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Charles E. Wyzanski Jr., a champion of civil liberties known for his controversial rulings on conscientious objectors and the Vietnam War, has died at age 80. Wyzanski, who suffered a cerebral hemorrhage Sunday and died Wednesday, was appointed to the federal bench in 1941 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was 35 at the time, one of the youngest men ever appointed to the post. As senior judge from 1971 until his death, Wyzanski sat in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
Wendy Davis, the long shot Democratic candidate for Texas governor, deserves all the scrutiny she is getting for blurring some facts in her compelling life story. When she got divorced, how long she lived as a single mother in a trailer, whether she was remarried and financially comfortable when she went off to Harvard Law School are not minor points in a narrative built on overcoming hardship. Politicians, whatever their party, must be held to the highest standard of truth, so it's entirely fair to rap her for overstating the adverse conditions of her life in order to make her climb to success sound more dramatic.
OPINION
March 16, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
At a conference of first ladies the other day, Barbara Bush said that 2012 has "been the worst campaign I've ever seen in my life. " I disagree. My vote would be for the repulsive 1988 campaign that her husband,George H.W. Bush, waged against Michael Dukakis, in which he accused the former Massachusetts governor of being soft on crime, anti-Pledge of Allegiance and pro-flag burning. Bush the elder took the aristocratic view that games (like tennis, or politics) should be played to the death but that animosity should be suspended when the drinks cart arrives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989 | From Times Wires Services
Law students at USC, UCLA and other schools throughout California and the nation held rallies Thursday to protest what they said is a lack of minorities on law school faculties. About 100 USC law students gathered in front of the school's Law Center on Thursday to encourage increased recruitment of minority faculty there and nationwide. The law school's full-time faculty of 39 includes eight white women and one black man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991
It seems to me that Harvard Law School professor McDowell is guilty of the same obfuscation he ascribes to those on both sides of the abortion issue. Of course the Supreme Court will not justify any decision affecting abortion rights on the individual justice's perceived morality of abortion. And, in my view, neither will the court's decisions derive from constitutional "principles of . . . federalism and separation of powers" as McDowell asserts. It seems clear to me that any right a woman has to implement her own private decision regarding abortion comes directly from our Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000
William Clements Warren, 91, a former dean of Columbia University Law School who helped transform the institution into a modern school. Warren is credited with improving the school's scholarship offerings and building a more diversified student body during his tenure as dean from 1952 to 1970. He also led the planning efforts for the school's main building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1988
The column raises some interesting points. Judge Budzyn sentenced Debra Ann Forster to stay on birth control for the rest of her childbearing life. Now Dershowitz is right in the idea that every "ist" will be offended by the severity of Forster's sentence; they always are, aren't they? No matter the victim, no matter the crime, the "ists" will always scream for the rights of the culprit. They identify, because of a faulty self-image, with the social-deficient person now facing justice.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|