Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarvard School Of Public Health
IN THE NEWS

Harvard School Of Public Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2003 | From Reuters
The more television children watch, the less fruit and vegetables they eat, probably because the advertising they see leaves them craving junk food instead, a study said Monday. Heavy television viewing by children has been linked to eating more junk food, to getting less exercise and to obesity, but this was the first study to show that TV watching led to a lower consumption of fruits and vegetables, said the report, which was published in the journal Pediatrics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2003 | From Reuters
The more television children watch, the less fruit and vegetables they eat, probably because the advertising they see leaves them craving junk food instead, a study said Monday. Heavy television viewing by children has been linked to eating more junk food, to getting less exercise and to obesity, but this was the first study to show that TV watching led to a lower consumption of fruits and vegetables, said the report, which was published in the journal Pediatrics.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 7, 1987
The Harvard School of Public Health, departing from its usual mission of training doctors, said that it would join the television and movie industries in a nationwide program to tell people about the danger of drunken driving. The school will seek to insert anti-alcohol messages into movie scripts, enlist actors as spokesmen, oversee production of television commercials and buy spots in prime time to broadcast them.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Harvard University's School of Public Health said it received $25 million from Microsoft Corp.'s co-founder and chairman, Bill Gates, and his wife to study AIDS prevention in Nigeria. The Nigerian initiative will begin by profiling the nature of HIV infection in Africa's most populous country, said Barry Bloom, dean of the school, which already has a similar program in Senegal.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Harvard University's School of Public Health said it received $25 million from Microsoft Corp.'s co-founder and chairman, Bill Gates, and his wife to study AIDS prevention in Nigeria. The Nigerian initiative will begin by profiling the nature of HIV infection in Africa's most populous country, said Barry Bloom, dean of the school, which already has a similar program in Senegal.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high percentage of college binge drinkers are white males under the legal drinking age of 21 who find cheap or free alcohol at fraternity parties or local bars, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. "Students today come to college expecting to drink," said Henry Wechsler, director of Harvard's College Alcohol Studies Program. "They think that's what you're supposed to do in college, and they find plenty of ways to do it."
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Alcohol-related arrests on college campuses surged 24.3% in 1998, the largest jump in seven years, according to a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Law enforcement officials and crime experts attributed the increase to more heavy drinking among college students coupled with better reporting and tougher enforcement. "Alcohol abuse is the No. 1 problem on every college campus in this country, and I don't care how big they are or how small they are," said police Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Dr. Sheldon Greenfield, best known for his role in creating methods to measure quality of patient care, has been appointed to the faculty of UC Irvine's College of Medicine. Greenfield was director of the Primary Care Outcomes Research Institute at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. He also is an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Greenfield becomes UCI's seventh Donald Bren Professor.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high percentage of college binge drinkers are white males under the legal drinking age of 21 who find cheap or free alcohol at fraternity parties or local bars, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. "Students today come to college expecting to drink," said Henry Wechsler, director of Harvard's College Alcohol Studies Program. "They think that's what you're supposed to do in college, and they find plenty of ways to do it."
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Alcohol-related arrests on college campuses surged 24.3% in 1998, the largest jump in seven years, according to a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Law enforcement officials and crime experts attributed the increase to more heavy drinking among college students coupled with better reporting and tougher enforcement. "Alcohol abuse is the No. 1 problem on every college campus in this country, and I don't care how big they are or how small they are," said police Capt.
NEWS
December 7, 1987
The Harvard School of Public Health, departing from its usual mission of training doctors, said that it would join the television and movie industries in a nationwide program to tell people about the danger of drunken driving. The school will seek to insert anti-alcohol messages into movie scripts, enlist actors as spokesmen, oversee production of television commercials and buy spots in prime time to broadcast them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997
A postscript on Gov. Pete Wilson's dismissal of Paul Torrens of the UCLA School of Public Health and two other distinguished public health leaders from the state's Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee: The same day Wilson dumped Torrens, he (Torrens) was notified of receiving the Harvard School of Public Health's Alumni Award of Merit--one of three people to be recognized during the school's 75th anniversary. Seems like people who are up to Harvard's high standards aren't good enough to satisfy the governor.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|