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December 9, 2003 | From Reuters
The more television children watch, the less fruit and vegetables they eat, probably because the advertising they see leaves them craving junk food instead, a study said Monday. Heavy television viewing by children has been linked to eating more junk food, to getting less exercise and to obesity, but this was the first study to show that TV watching led to a lower consumption of fruits and vegetables, said the report, which was published in the journal Pediatrics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2003 | From Reuters
The more television children watch, the less fruit and vegetables they eat, probably because the advertising they see leaves them craving junk food instead, a study said Monday. Heavy television viewing by children has been linked to eating more junk food, to getting less exercise and to obesity, but this was the first study to show that TV watching led to a lower consumption of fruits and vegetables, said the report, which was published in the journal Pediatrics.
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NEWS
December 7, 1987
The Harvard School of Public Health, departing from its usual mission of training doctors, said that it would join the television and movie industries in a nationwide program to tell people about the danger of drunken driving. The school will seek to insert anti-alcohol messages into movie scripts, enlist actors as spokesmen, oversee production of television commercials and buy spots in prime time to broadcast them.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high percentage of college binge drinkers are white males under the legal drinking age of 21 who find cheap or free alcohol at fraternity parties or local bars, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. "Students today come to college expecting to drink," said Henry Wechsler, director of Harvard's College Alcohol Studies Program. "They think that's what you're supposed to do in college, and they find plenty of ways to do it."
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high percentage of college binge drinkers are white males under the legal drinking age of 21 who find cheap or free alcohol at fraternity parties or local bars, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. "Students today come to college expecting to drink," said Henry Wechsler, director of Harvard's College Alcohol Studies Program. "They think that's what you're supposed to do in college, and they find plenty of ways to do it."
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Alcohol-related arrests on college campuses surged 24.3% in 1998, the largest jump in seven years, according to a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Law enforcement officials and crime experts attributed the increase to more heavy drinking among college students coupled with better reporting and tougher enforcement. "Alcohol abuse is the No. 1 problem on every college campus in this country, and I don't care how big they are or how small they are," said police Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
On Monday, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health released study results showing that red meat consumption was associated with a higher risk of early death. The more red meat -- beef, pork or lamb, for the purposes of the research -- study participants reported they ate, the more likely they were to die during the period of time that data collection took place (more than 20 years). So what is it in red meat that might make it unhealthy?   No one is sure, exactly, but the authors of the Harvard study mention a few possible culprits in their paper in the Archives of Internal Medicine .   First, eating red meat has been linked to the incidence of heart disease.  The saturated fat and cholesterol in beef, pork and lamb are believed to play a role in the risk of coronary heart disease .  The type of iron found in red meat, known as heme iron, has also been linked to heart attacks and fatal heart disease.  Sodium in processed meats may increase blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Other chemicals that are used in processed meats may play a role in heart disease as well, by damaging blood vessels.
HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most people can count calories. Many have a clue about where fat lurks in their diets. However, fewer give carbohydrates much thought, or know why they should. But a growing number of top nutritional scientists blame excessive carbohydrates ? not fat ? for America's ills. They say cutting carbohydrates is the key to reversing obesity, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. "Fat is not the problem," says Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Alcohol-related arrests on college campuses surged 24.3% in 1998, the largest jump in seven years, according to a survey by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Law enforcement officials and crime experts attributed the increase to more heavy drinking among college students coupled with better reporting and tougher enforcement. "Alcohol abuse is the No. 1 problem on every college campus in this country, and I don't care how big they are or how small they are," said police Capt.
NEWS
December 7, 1987
The Harvard School of Public Health, departing from its usual mission of training doctors, said that it would join the television and movie industries in a nationwide program to tell people about the danger of drunken driving. The school will seek to insert anti-alcohol messages into movie scripts, enlist actors as spokesmen, oversee production of television commercials and buy spots in prime time to broadcast them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Dr. Sheldon Greenfield, best known for his role in creating methods to measure quality of patient care, has been appointed to the faculty of UC Irvine's College of Medicine. Greenfield was director of the Primary Care Outcomes Research Institute at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. He also is an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Greenfield becomes UCI's seventh Donald Bren Professor.
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