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July 16, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
For more than two decades, Nas' prolific career has been a hallmark for hip-hop, and now Harvard University has established a fellowship in the lyricist's honor.   The W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University and the Hip-Hop Archive announced the Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Fellowship on Tuesday. The goal of the fellowship is to provide chosen scholars and artists with an opportunity to show that “education is real power.” The mission of the Hip-Hop Archive, according to the announcement, is to seek projects from scholars and artists that build on the rich and complex hip-hop tradition; to respect that tradition through historically grounded and contextualized critical insights; and most important, to represent one's creative and/or intellectually rigorous contribution to hip-hop and the discourse through personal and academic projects.   RELATED: 'Life is Good' for hip-hop's Nas Personal projects of fellows may include manuscripts, performance pieces, album work, curriculum planning, primary archival research and exhibition preparation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Justin Kaplan, an author and cultural historian who wrote a definitive, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Mark Twain and spiced the popular canon as general editor of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, has died. He was 88. Kaplan died Sunday at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass. He had been suffering for years from Parkinson's disease, said his wife, author Anne Bernays. A longtime professor at Harvard University, Kaplan wrote several acclaimed biographies, notably "Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain.
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BOOKS
September 18, 1988 | ELENA BRUNET
This ambitious, speculative work won the Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction in 1978. Edward O. Wilson, professor of science at Harvard University, is probably best known as a proponent for the discipline of sociobiology, which combines biological principles with the social sciences. "On Human Nature" applies Darwin's evolutionary theory to social organization--to heredity, sex, altruism, religion, aggression--with fascinating conclusions.
SCIENCE
February 14, 2014 | By Amina Khan, This post has been updated. See note below.
Imagine a team of workers that can tirelessly build and rebuild complicated structures even under daunting and dangerous conditions. They already exist - they're called termites. Now, inspired by these mound-building insects, Harvard University scientists have created a mini-swarm of surprisingly simpleminded robots that can work together to construct buildings much larger than themselves. The findings, described in the journal Science, present an important step toward designing robots that may one day be able to build research facilities in the deep ocean, buildings on Mars or even levees at a flood zone during an emergency - jobs that are far too hazardous or expensive for human workers to do. [Updated 11:28 a.m. Feb. 14: "It's a very impressive accomplishment," said Hod Lipson, a roboticist at Cornell University, who was not involved in the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
A Harvard University sleep expert testified Friday in the Michael Jackson wrongful-death case that the singer suffered from almost total sleep deprivation for about two months as a result of his daily use of the anesthetic propofol. Dr. Charles Czeisler said Jackson's request for a teleprompter to remember the words to his classic songs "was shocking and indicated to me the profound impact this sleep deprivation was having on his memory. " Czeisler, who has a medical degree and a doctorate, testified that propofol brings on "a drug-induced coma" that is far different from sleep.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | JOHN WILKES
Cosmology--the study of the universe and its origin--is perhaps science's grandest stage. But galaxies don't lend themselves to experiments as, say, atoms do. As a result, cosmology has historically occupied a place on the edge of science, say MIT physicist and essayist Alan Lightman and MIT graduate student Roberta Brawer in "Origins," a fascinating, surprisingly accessible and altogether human collection of conversations with today's leading cosmologists.
BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | Jonathan Weiner, Jonathan Weiner's latest book, "The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time,"is the 1994 winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Science
"If you're a storyteller," the filmmaker Howard Hawks is quoted in "Naturalist," "find a good story and tell it." For more than 40 years, Edward O. Wilson, one of the preeminent evolutionary biologists of our time, has been finding and telling good stories in unlikely places, from fire ants in Alabama, to bulldog ants in Western Australia, to army ants in Costa Rica. ("Most children have a bug period," he says, "and I never grew out of mine."
SCIENCE
November 18, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
College students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania found in a study of hundreds of students in Bangalore, India. Their results, recently released as a working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research, suggest that one of the contributing forces behind government corruption could be who gets into government work in the first place. For instance, “if people have the view that jobs in government are corrupt, people who are honest might not want to get into that system,” said Rema Hanna, an associate professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By DiAngelea Millar
New film school rankings show that New York University is No. 1, producing the most graduates that have participated in the production of quality films. This is the first such study from Ranker.com, a website that collects data and gathers answers to questions like "Who makes the best acoustic guitar?" or "Who is the funniest comedian?" In conducting the rather unscientific study, Ravi Iyer, a data scientist for Ranker.com, sifted through data from freebase.com, which he used to find actors and other film workers and their alma maters.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two premed students died and a third woman was injured in a murder-suicide at a Harvard University dormitory Sunday morning in what school officials termed "a tragic incident." Sinedu Tadesse, a 20-year-old junior from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, "viciously stabbed" her roommate, Trang Ho, 20, of Lowell, Mass., just after 8 a.m., police said. The attack awoke 27-year-old Thao Nguyen, also of Lowell, who was visiting Ho and sleeping in the other bedroom of a two-room suite.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Following a report of explosives in four Harvard University buildings that led to evacuations during finals, university police late Monday morning messaged students that they have "no reason to believe there is a threat" on campus. "Access to Harvard Yard has been restricted to Yard residents with Harvard IDs. As of the writing of this message the report remains unconfirmed and the HUPD has no reason to believe there is a threat to any other site on campus,” Harvard police said in the message to students.  Much of Harvard Yard had been evacuated and exams at the university were canceled Monday morning after the report of explosives in the four buildings at locations throughout the campus.  Massachusetts State Police officials said a bomb squad and K-9 unit were sent to the scene, and searched through the four buildings: the Science Center, and Thayer, Sever and Emerson Halls.  Student George Doran said a supervisor was reading exam instructions to his constitutional law class in the Science Center when alarms went off about two minutes after 9 a.m. He said students filed out and were directed to Annenberg Hall, the freshman dining room, where they were informed by email and text that there was a bomb threat on campus.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated to reflect a new development. See note below for details.
A pair of finals-week threats sent shivers through two Boston-area campuses Monday morning, adding to a seemingly ever-growing number of New England universities to face scares over the past two months. Four buildings on Harvard University's campus in Cambridge -- including a freshman dorm and the campus' science center -- were evacuated shortly after 9 a.m. after officials sent out an alert warning of an unconfirmed report of explosives in each facility. No explosions were reported.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Matt Pearce
Alert: Unconfirmed reports of explosives at four sites on campus: Science Center, Thayer, Sever and Emerson. Evacuate those buildings now. Harvard University issued that warning Monday morning, and police swarmed the Cambridge, Mass., campus for several hours. The bomb threat proved false, but Harvard was not alone in seeing its final exams disrupted: That afternoon, the University of Massachusetts Boston evacuated a building after reports of a gunman, which also turned out to be unfounded.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Harvard University was partially evacuated Monday morning after school officials sent out an alert about explosives on campus. "Unconfirmed reports of explosives at four sites on campus: Science Center, Thayer, Sever, and Emerson," said the campus alert sent at 9:02 a.m. "Please evacuate those buildings now. " Officials at the Cambridge, Mass., school said there had been no reports of explosions. Campus and Cambridge police were investigating the reports. The evacuated buildings were diverse.
SCIENCE
November 18, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
College students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania found in a study of hundreds of students in Bangalore, India. Their results, recently released as a working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research, suggest that one of the contributing forces behind government corruption could be who gets into government work in the first place. For instance, “if people have the view that jobs in government are corrupt, people who are honest might not want to get into that system,” said Rema Hanna, an associate professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Karin Klein
During the eight-year run of the show “House M.D.” the series mantra was, “Everybody lies.” The corollary to that could well be, “Everybody cheats.” Maybe not everybody, but fairly close. That's why I can't fathom the fuss being made over a Harvard University survey that found 42% of incoming freshmen admitted to having cheated in homework in high school, and 10% admitted to cheating on tests. People, including my colleague Paul Whitefield, conclude they've found the difference between those elite Ivy Leaguers and the rest of us. Aha!
NATIONAL
June 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Harvard University President Lawrence Summers, whose term ends Friday, said he will return to the school as a professor next year. Summers said he is looking forward to teaching, writing and researching.
NEWS
June 30, 1985 | Associated Press
The first woman to head Harvard University's history department, Angeliki E. Laiou, will begin her three-year term Monday, officials said. The post rotates among tenured professors.
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
With one adventurous summer trip, senior running back Jacob Knight of Los Angeles Crenshaw demonstrated more leadership than any speech he could have given and more determination than any broken-field run he could have made. He traveled to Cambridge, Mass., at the invitation of the Harvard University football coaching staff to participate in a one-day camp and campus tour, an experience that few, if any, Crenshaw players have dared to attempt. Walking on the grounds of one of America's most prestigious academic institutions, Knight contemplated what is possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
For more than two decades, Nas' prolific career has been a hallmark for hip-hop, and now Harvard University has established a fellowship in the lyricist's honor.   The W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University and the Hip-Hop Archive announced the Nasir Jones Hip-Hop Fellowship on Tuesday. The goal of the fellowship is to provide chosen scholars and artists with an opportunity to show that “education is real power.” The mission of the Hip-Hop Archive, according to the announcement, is to seek projects from scholars and artists that build on the rich and complex hip-hop tradition; to respect that tradition through historically grounded and contextualized critical insights; and most important, to represent one's creative and/or intellectually rigorous contribution to hip-hop and the discourse through personal and academic projects.   RELATED: 'Life is Good' for hip-hop's Nas Personal projects of fellows may include manuscripts, performance pieces, album work, curriculum planning, primary archival research and exhibition preparation.
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