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Harvey L Pitt

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BUSINESS
May 9, 2001 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey L. Pitt, President Bush's apparent choice to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, is a high-profile securities lawyer who is well-regarded on Wall Street and in Washington regulatory circles. But Pitt's resume and the legal cases he has taken worry some experts, who fear that he could oversee a dilution of the investor-protection and corporate-accountability initiatives adopted by the SEC in the 1990s.
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BUSINESS
December 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
The New York Police Department's top legal advisor and the official who oversaw cleanup of the 1990 savings and loan fiasco are among the candidates President Bush is considering to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission. White House officials have approached Stephen Hammerman, deputy commissioner for the NYPD, about possibly taking over as SEC chairman, New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt found himself embroiled in a new controversy, on reports that he failed to share with fellow commissioners potentially inflammatory information about the man Pitt picked to head the nation's new accounting-oversight board. William H. Webster, whom the SEC approved by a 3-2 vote on Oct.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey Pitt, who submitted his resignation Tuesday, defended his 15-month tenure and said a "climate of attack and partisanship" undercut his work. "In a partisan environment, criticism often devolves into attack," Pitt said Friday in a speech to the Securities Industry Assn., the trade group for Wall Street investment firms. "It's not just unproductive. It's counterproductive."
OPINION
January 28, 2002
Careful readers of The Times on Jan. 24 must have been thoroughly confused about plans to upgrade the regulation of the accounting profession under the aegis of the Securities and Exchange Commission. "SEC Chief Pushes Accounting Agenda" (Business) reported correctly that the SEC opposes any accounting regulatory system that is directly under the control of a profession it is designed to discipline. That is what I said on Jan. 17 at a news conference in Washington, and what I said on Jan. 23 in a speech in San Diego.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2001 | From Bloomberg News, Times Staff
President Bush on Thursday officially nominated Harvey L. Pitt, one of the nation's leading securities lawyers, to be chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The decision, which had been expected since early this week, caps a lengthy search by the Bush administration to fill the position of the nation's top securities cop. If confirmed by the Senate, the 56-year-old Pitt would replace Arthur Levitt, who resigned in February after a record 7 1/2 years at the helm of the agency.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2002 | From Reuters
Congress' two top Democrats wrote to President Bush on Wednesday seeking the resignation of Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt and questioning the SEC chief's handling of the creation of a national board to police corporate accounting. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) and House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt's one-year pledge to sit out votes on cases involving former clients has expired, leaving him free to act on all issues before the agency. The former securities lawyer, who was sworn in as SEC chairman a year ago last Saturday, said he will decide whether to participate in agency actions case by case. Those judgments may include whether to vote on possible civil charges against bankrupt energy trader Enron Corp.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
Harvey L. Pitt, the chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, was acting on his own when he asked Congress for a promotion and a raise, White House spokesman Ari Fleischer said Wednesday. President Bush did not know about the request until he read news accounts about it, Fleischer said. Still, Fleischer declined to criticize Pitt, saying: "I think it's always a prerogative of independent agencies to talk to Congress."
OPINION
October 10, 2002
The recent conduct of Harvey L. Pitt, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is a sharp reminder of why the nation's chief fiscal watchdog needs watching. Despite his promises to clean up the accounting industry, Pitt is mired in his own flagrant conflicts of interest. He is also reported to be backpedaling on appointing a strong independent oversight commission.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2002 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Even before Harvey L. Pitt announced his resignation Tuesday night as chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, names of possible successors began flying around Wall Street and Washington. The list includes high-profile politicians, academics and several people with experience at the agency. Here are some of the names most frequently mentioned, along with brief biographies and early handicapping of their chances: * James R. Doty, 62, former SEC general counsel.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2002 | James Gerstenzang and Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writers
President Bush is near a decision to oust Harvey L. Pitt as chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a senior White House official said Sunday. The decision on Pitt's future, however, isn't likely to be made final, let alone public, until after Tuesday's elections and possibly not until a bit later in the year. Bush could remove Pitt as SEC chairman but cannot drive him off the independent commission if Pitt refuses to go.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt found himself embroiled in a new controversy, on reports that he failed to share with fellow commissioners potentially inflammatory information about the man Pitt picked to head the nation's new accounting-oversight board. William H. Webster, whom the SEC approved by a 3-2 vote on Oct.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2002 | Maura Reynolds and Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writers
White House officials carefully distanced themselves Friday from embattled Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt, saying the administration was awaiting the outcome of inquiries into whether he withheld potentially damaging information about his choice for a top oversight job. Away from the White House, senior Republicans focused on the potential political fallout of the flap, grumbling that Pitt had put President Bush in an awkward position just before Tuesday's election.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2002 | Walter Hamilton and Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writers
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt faced a new torrent of calls for his resignation Thursday after reports that he did not disclose potentially inflammatory information about the man he picked to head the nation's new accounting-oversight board. William H. Webster, chosen last week to head the panel, chaired the audit committee of a financially troubled company that last year fired its outside accounting firm and has been sued by shareholders for fraud.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2002 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
The administration's latest misstep in handling America's corporate crisis has convinced many people on both sides of the political divide that President Bush does not take the business scandals of the last year all that seriously. Revelations that Bush's Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, Harvey L.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Securities and Exchange Commission warned corporate lawyers Monday that they will face growing federal regulation unless they fight fraud from within their companies. Corporate lawyers, like auditors, have sometimes forgotten that their "ultimate client" is the investing public, Harvey L. Pitt, the beleaguered SEC chief, told business lawyers at the annual meeting of the American Bar Assn.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2002 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Even before Harvey L. Pitt announced his resignation Tuesday night as chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, names of possible successors began flying around Wall Street and Washington. The list includes high-profile politicians, academics and several people with experience at the agency. Here are some of the names most frequently mentioned, along with brief biographies and early handicapping of their chances: * James R. Doty, 62, former SEC general counsel.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2002 | From Reuters
Congress' two top Democrats wrote to President Bush on Wednesday seeking the resignation of Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey L. Pitt and questioning the SEC chief's handling of the creation of a national board to police corporate accounting. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) and House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.
OPINION
October 10, 2002
The recent conduct of Harvey L. Pitt, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is a sharp reminder of why the nation's chief fiscal watchdog needs watching. Despite his promises to clean up the accounting industry, Pitt is mired in his own flagrant conflicts of interest. He is also reported to be backpedaling on appointing a strong independent oversight commission.
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