Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHarvey Milk School
IN THE NEWS

Harvey Milk School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it seems like any other high school classroom. Students are scribbling notes in science workbooks and a teacher hovers over them, correcting mistakes. Blackboards list assignments, and posters on the wall mark the achievements of blacks and Latinos. Suddenly, one pupil clutches his stomach and complains about nausea from a dose of AZT, a drug used to combat AIDS. A friend nods sympathetically across the room, and the teacher inquires gently about the boy's condition.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 30, 2008 | Erika Hayasaki
Gay students who attend this cozy third-floor Greenwich Village high school did not live through the launch of the national gay rights movement, which unfolded a few blocks away, and until recently many knew little about the man their school was named after: Harvey Milk.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
December 30, 2008 | Erika Hayasaki
Gay students who attend this cozy third-floor Greenwich Village high school did not live through the launch of the national gay rights movement, which unfolded a few blocks away, and until recently many knew little about the man their school was named after: Harvey Milk.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it seems like any other high school classroom. Students are scribbling notes in science workbooks and a teacher hovers over them, correcting mistakes. Blackboards list assignments, and posters on the wall mark the achievements of blacks and Latinos. Suddenly, one pupil clutches his stomach and complains about nausea from a dose of AZT, a drug used to combat AIDS. A friend nods sympathetically across the room, and the teacher inquires gently about the boy's condition.
NEWS
June 7, 1985 | TONY ROBINSON and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Hounded out of regular New York City schools by taunts and fights, 20 high school students have enrolled in what is apparently the nation's first public school program to teach and counsel homosexual teen-agers. Classes began April 15 at the Harvey Milk School, named for the San Francisco official and gay activist who was murdered on Nov. 27, 1978. Classes are held in an annex of a small stone Methodist church in Manhattan's Greenwich Village.
NEWS
June 6, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A city high school for homosexual students--the first such public school in the United States--has opened in Manhattan with 20 students, and its operators expect enrollment to triple next fall. The school, which opened quietly in April in a Greenwich Village church, is named the Harvey Milk School, for the gay activist and San Francisco city supervisor who was shot to death in 1978.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Demonstrators cheered and jeered students arriving Monday for the first day of classes at Harvey Milk School in Greenwich Village, New York's first public high school for gays and lesbians. "We all want our schools to be safer for all kids," said Marisa Ragonese, 25, who sat on the sidewalk outside the school. "But right now we need to be sure the kids who are harassed and bullied have a safe environment, someplace they can go."
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | BETTINA BOXALL and TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND
A pleased, shy grin spreads over Christine's face as she talks about her first few days at the EAGLES Center. "I was flattered," she says. "They were very warm. They thought I was cute. . . . This is the best situation I've ever been in." Certainly it was a change for the 16-year-old, who says she left Theodore Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights after hearing rumors that someone had compiled a list of gay students "who were going to get bashed. . . . I didn't like that school no more.
HOME & GARDEN
March 25, 2004 | Janet Eastman; David A. Keeps; Dinah Eng
Little Bo Peep has lost her ... sweep? Well, not really. But a pink-and-blue vacuum cleaner that looks as if it would fit in Miss Peep's nursery is one of three dressed-up vacuums being auctioned off for charity. The stylized machines, created by fashion designers picked by Vanity Fair, are on EBay through Saturday.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND and BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John was stunned to find himself caught in an uproar after he helped form a gay support group at Fountain Valley High School last fall. He shouldn't have been. The 17-year-old and his friends had become unwitting combatants on one of the most volatile fronts of the gay rights struggle: America's schools. Some of John's classmates printed up T-shirts proclaiming "No Gays."
NEWS
June 7, 1985 | TONY ROBINSON and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Hounded out of regular New York City schools by taunts and fights, 20 high school students have enrolled in what is apparently the nation's first public school program to teach and counsel homosexual teen-agers. Classes began April 15 at the Harvey Milk School, named for the San Francisco official and gay activist who was murdered on Nov. 27, 1978. Classes are held in an annex of a small stone Methodist church in Manhattan's Greenwich Village.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|