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Harvey Rosenfield

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BUSINESS
November 26, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The former "Nader's Raider" who used California's initiative process to regulate auto insurance rates is headed back to the ballot. This time he's spoiling to take on health insurers. Harvey Rosenfield, the combative attorney and consumer advocate who wrote California's landmark Proposition 103 more than two decades ago, is preparing a ballot initiative that would force health insurers to get state government approval before they could raise premiums. Stricter controls are needed to put some restraints on a industry that's reaping fat returns for shareholders and multimillion-dollar salaries for executives while consumers struggle to pay for coverage, Rosenfield said.
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BUSINESS
October 21, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
George Joseph must think that the old saw defining insanity as doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result doesn't apply to him - or at least that it's amenable to tweaking. Joseph, the billionaire nonagenarian founder and still kingpin of the insurance company Mercury General Group, is represented on November's statewide ballot as the promoter and virtually sole bankroller of Proposition 33. This initiative would allow auto insurers to offer discounts to drivers who have maintained coverage without a break, which is known as "persistency.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
For the first time, prominent consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield is backing a Republican in the race for state insurance commissioner -- a move that may change the odds in the race. Rosenfield, the author of 1988's landmark Proposition 103 auto insurance initiative, has always been considered a Democratic ally. But the party's candidate in the Nov. 7 election is Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, whom Rosenfield has criticized for trying to water down Proposition 103 while in the state Assembly.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Proponents of an auto insurance discount initiative -- backed financially by the chairman of Mercury General Corp. -- are accusing the state attorney general and their opponents of submitting incorrect statements for the official ballot pamphlet. The campaign to pass Proposition 33 in November filed a lawsuit on Friday contending that the legal "title and summary" that is to be put before voters contains "inaccurate language that is highly likely to prejudice voters against the measure.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of consumer groups and labor unions has launched an effort to diminish the growing power of California's managed-care industry through a November ballot initiative. The initiative effort, led by consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield and the California Nurses Assn., is sweeping in scope, and several versions have been submitted to Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey Rosenfield had to get up before dawn for his recent live interview on NBC's "Today," but it was well worth the trouble. His advice for consumers on ways to protect themselves against medical malpractice got immediate feedback. "It was amazing," he says. "I would say we got more than 100 calls just that morning from physicians, patients and policy-makers all over the country." For Rosenfield, 42, educating consumers is a full-time job and a personal commitment.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey Rosenfield, head of Voter Revolt and the author of Proposition 103, the insurance reform initiative, says he plans to form a public interest law firm to go after insurance companies who have treated consumers unfairly. "For the last three years, we've been contacted by thousands of people, complaining about the companies," Rosenfield said.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As power outages and higher utility bills loom in California, Harvey Rosenfield--the man who unsuccessfully fought electricity deregulation four years ago--doesn't say, "I told you so." He says a lot more. "All the people who were on the wrong side are being punished," Rosenfield said. "They're being exposed. Events have proved us right. It's just too bad it has come at this price."
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past decade, Harvey Rosenfield has been a leading consumer activist in California. But lately, he has found himself in a nasty fight with some former allies who claim he has misrepresented his allegiances. Ordinarily, this would attract little attention outside the small world of consumer activists. However, because of three anti-lawyer initiatives on the March 26 ballot, the stakes and the level of nastiness loom large.
OPINION
May 14, 1989
Harvey Rosenfield for insurance commissioner! PAUL STEIN Pasadena
BUSINESS
November 26, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The former "Nader's Raider" who used California's initiative process to regulate auto insurance rates is headed back to the ballot. This time he's spoiling to take on health insurers. Harvey Rosenfield, the combative attorney and consumer advocate who wrote California's landmark Proposition 103 more than two decades ago, is preparing a ballot initiative that would force health insurers to get state government approval before they could raise premiums. Stricter controls are needed to put some restraints on a industry that's reaping fat returns for shareholders and multimillion-dollar salaries for executives while consumers struggle to pay for coverage, Rosenfield said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
The ads weren't far from each other on Wilshire Boulevard in Koreatown. One, on a billboard, was critical of an automobile and home insurance company. The other, draped across the sprawling face of a tall building, was a vodka promotion that appeared to include an essential part of the female anatomy. Any guess which one was torn down because of a complaint? "Truth is more controversial than pornography," said Harvey Rosenfield, founder of Consumer Watchdog, whose ad was dismantled last week.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
It was big. It was bright. It was controversial. And now it's gone. On Thursday, CBS Outdoor Inc. took down a billboard graphic -- black text on a screaming yellow background -- reading: "Consumer Watchdog says: 'You Can't Trust Mercury Insurance.' " The towering Mid-Wilshire billboard was in a prime spot for attracting attention, at least from Mercury Insurance's parent company, Mercury General Corp. It sat about half a mile east of corporate headquarters. Consumer Watchdog's billboard was taken down because Mercury, California's third-largest auto insurer and ninth-largest homeowners insurer, complained to CBS Outdoor, said Harvey Rosenfield, founder of Consumer Watchdog.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2008 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
New rules for setting rates on car, home and other insurance policies in California will result in higher premiums for businesses and individuals, a consumer advocate charged Wednesday. The regulations adopted Tuesday by the state Department of Insurance "are an outrageous giveaway to the insurance industry," Harvey Rosenfield, founder of Consumer Watchdog, said in a letter to Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner. Rosenfield, author of Proposition 103, the 1988 ballot measure that overhauled California's insurance regulations, said the rules would weaken the state's ability to mandate lower rates, such as the 15.9%, $250-million cut Poizner recently ordered in Allstate's auto insurance premiums.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
For the first time, prominent consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield is backing a Republican in the race for state insurance commissioner -- a move that may change the odds in the race. Rosenfield, the author of 1988's landmark Proposition 103 auto insurance initiative, has always been considered a Democratic ally. But the party's candidate in the Nov. 7 election is Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, whom Rosenfield has criticized for trying to water down Proposition 103 while in the state Assembly.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
California voters may be in for a repeat of the 1988 ballot free-for-all that produced a landmark state insurance law. Consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield -- author of Proposition 103, the successful 1988 insurance initiative -- unveiled Friday a proposed ballot measure crammed with provisions that auto and homeowner insurers would be likely to oppose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1991
California Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi has ordered insurers to rebate $1.5 billion to policyholders. Proposition 103 proponent Harvey Rosenfield states: "It is proof that Proposition 103 was right." Actually, it only proves that it's easy for a politician to give away someone else's money. GARY A. ROBB Los Angeles
BUSINESS
June 26, 1993
Proposition 103 champion Harvey Rosenfield says he is leaving Voter Revolt, the organization that promoted the landmark 1988 ballot measure as a way to reduce auto insurance rates by 20%. Rosenfield said he will form a new group to fight the wars over putting Proposition 103 into effect and to contest a flood of insurers' requests for rate increases expected to come when a new law takes effect July 1.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey Rosenfield does not mince words when it comes to attacking the power companies that have profited handsomely under California's energy deregulation law. In various interviews, the consumer activist has derided the firms as "pirates and bullies" and even "crooks" using "blackouts to blackmail the state." Despite such rhetoric, a foundation that Rosenfield runs has invested in the nation's largest energy merchant, Houston-based Enron Corp.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As power outages and higher utility bills loom in California, Harvey Rosenfield--the man who unsuccessfully fought electricity deregulation four years ago--doesn't say, "I told you so." He says a lot more. "All the people who were on the wrong side are being punished," Rosenfield said. "They're being exposed. Events have proved us right. It's just too bad it has come at this price."
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