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April 5, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
There is growing evidence that two scientists who claimed last month to have achieved a major breakthrough in nuclear fusion are at least partly correct, but recently acquired copies of their research report raise puzzling questions about one of their major findings. At least a dozen major laboratories around the world are now trying to repeat the experiments announced by electrochemists B. Stanley Pons and Milton Fleischmann, and there have been scattered reports of some success.
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NEWS
April 5, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
There is growing evidence that two scientists who claimed last month to have achieved a major breakthrough in nuclear fusion are at least partly correct, but recently acquired copies of their research report raise puzzling questions about one of their major findings. At least a dozen major laboratories around the world are now trying to repeat the experiments announced by electrochemists B. Stanley Pons and Milton Fleischmann, and there have been scattered reports of some success.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exhaust fumes from planes flying overhead have a far greater effect on the Earth's climate than equivalent sources on the ground, according to a new study. Colin Johnson of Britain's Harwell Laboratory has found that the effect on nitrogen oxides from aircraft is 30 times as great as the effect from other sources of equal magnitude on the ground.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The concentration of harmful ozone pollution in the lower atmosphere has more than doubled in the last 100 years, and it will probably rise at an even faster rate in the next 30 years, researchers said today. Researchers from Britain's Harwell Laboratory said recent measurements of ground-level ozone indicate that levels of the gas are, on the average, twice as high as those recorded by French researchers in Paris in the late 1800s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The concentration of harmful ozone pollution in the lower atmosphere has more than doubled in the last 100 years, and it will likely rise at an even faster rate in the next 30 years, researchers said last week. Researchers from Britain's Harwell Laboratory said recent measurements of ground-level ozone indicate that levels of the gas are, on the average, twice as high as recorded by French researchers in Paris in the late 1800s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ruth Werner, a communist spy who transmitted atom bomb secrets from Britain to the Soviet Union in the 1940s, died Friday in her native Berlin. She was 93. The death of Werner, who operated under the code name "Sonya" and gained the rank of colonel in the Red Army's reconnaissance service, was announced by the former East German communist party. No cause of death was given.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Federal scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory will take sensitive scientific instruments to Utah next week to help analyze an experiment there that has been touted as a breakthrough in the effort to produce energy through nuclear fusion. Los Alamos is one of nine laboratories across the country trying to duplicate the experiment.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
In a move that virtually buries hopes for cold fusion, the British Atomic Energy Authority said Thursday it has abandoned efforts to replicate a controversial Utah experiment and branded claims of achieving fusion-in-a-flask "a mad idea." The decision by Britain's Harwell Laboratory is particularly significant because one of the scientists who made the startling announcement in Salt Lake City last March is a consultant to the lab and made materials he had used in the Utah research available to his British colleagues.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists at major research institutions throughout the country are growing increasingly frustrated over their inability to replicate a supposedly simple experiment that purportedly achieves nuclear fusion at room temperature. Although there have been scattered confirmations of parts of the experiment announced a month ago at the University of Utah, no U.S. laboratory has been able to verify the entire experiment. Not even one of the major research laboratories best equipped to repeat the experiment has succeeded.
NEWS
May 9, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
With the scientific world waiting in suspense, chemists B. Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann failed in Los Angeles on Monday to deliver on a promise to present new evidence in support of their controversial claim to have created nuclear fusion in a flask. And, while still clinging to their contention that they have achieved cold fusion, Pons and Fleischmann went on to retract some earlier statements they had made to buttress their seemingly fantastic findings. Many members of the scientific community agreed that the two researchers--whose experimental claims have been subjected to growing criticism--must present dramatic new results or much more extensive experimental details in order to retain their credibility.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
The dispute over cold fusion reached the boiling point Tuesday as scientists assembled here said they were prepared "to sign the death certificate" for the fusion-in-a-flask experiment and one Nobel Laureate said the head of the University of Utah, which backed the research, "ought to be fired." But a university official defended chemists B. Stanley Pons of the University of Utah and Martin Fleischmann of the University of Southampton in England and fired back with charges of "hand waving" and "Eastern elite" bias.
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