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NATIONAL
November 16, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Lawyers for an Army psychiatrist accused of killing 13 people during a shooting rampage at Ft. Hood a year ago declined to put on a defense case Monday, ending a military hearing to determine whether Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan should face murder charges. Ft. Hood's senior commander will ultimately decide whether there is enough evidence to try Hasan at a court-martial. He is accused of opening fire on soldiers Nov. 5, 2009, at a medical processing center for troops deploying to and from Iraq and Afghanistan.
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NATIONAL
October 21, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
The Army psychiatrist accused of killing 13 people in a shooting rampage in November sought "the most high-tech handgun" available and wanted maximum ammunition capacity, a gun salesman testified Thursday. Maj. Nidal Hasan also bought extended ammunition magazines and extra rounds while recording a salesman's gun instructions on his cellphone, Fredrick Brannon, a former employee of Guns Galore in Killeen, Texas, said at a military hearing. Brannon said Hasan also bought an expensive targeting laser and "wanted to know everything there was to know" about the sophisticated FN Five-seveN semiautomatic pistol he purchased Aug. 1, 2009 ?
NATIONAL
October 21, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
On the chaotic afternoon of Nov. 5, a gunman firing a laser-equipped pistol shot and killed several soldiers inside a crowded base processing center, then ran outside to shoot more victims. There, he encountered Ft. Hood civilian police officers Kimberly Munley and Mark Todd. The gunman opened fire ? first on Munley, then on Todd. Within 30 seconds, the officers testified at a military hearing Wednesday, Munley lay wounded and defenseless as Todd confronted the gunman from 20 feet away.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2010 | McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Ten more soldiers took the stand Friday to describe the carnage unleashed last November at this Army base's medical processing center when a uniformed man several identified as Maj. Nidal Hasan opened fire with a handgun. Four soldiers described being hit as they tried to take cover, and several told of either being shot or watching others gunned down while trying to rush the gunman. Via a video hookup from Kandahar, Afghanistan, several witnesses spoke emotionally of watching as three members of their unit were slain ?
NATIONAL
October 15, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Stiff with pain from lingering bullet wounds in his leg and back, Army Staff Sgt. Paul Martin rose slowly to his feet on the witness stand Thursday and pointed across the military courtroom. "Yes, sir, that's him," Martin said, nodding toward Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, huddled in a wheelchair beneath a blanket and watch cap. Martin said it was Hasan, firing methodically from two handguns, who shot him twice Nov. 5. And it was Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, who fired again and again at soldiers inside a medical processing building as they tried to flee, Martin testified.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Just after lunch on Nov. 5, an Army psychiatrist inside the medical processing center at Ft. Hood did something that mystified Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford, the enlisted man in charge at the center that day. Maj. Nidal Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, suddenly stood up, shouted, "Allahu Akbar!" ? Arabic for "God is great" ? and reached under his uniform top. "I was wondering why he would say, 'Allahu Akbar,' " Lunsford recalled Wednesday at a hearing for Hasan, who is charged with killing 13 people and wounding 32 others that day. As Lunsford struggled to make sense of what the psychiatrist was doing, he said, Hasan pulled out a handgun and opened fire on soldiers awaiting medical processing.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
Alma Nemelka said her nephew was the first to die. He was standing at the rear of the Soldier Readiness Center at Ft. Hood, Texas, when an Army officer burst in shouting, " Allahu akbar! " Pfc. Aaron Thomas Nemelka, 19 and soon to be deployed to the Middle East, was shot in the head. On Tuesday, the man accused of killing Nemelka and 12 others, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan of the Army Medical Corps, will appear for his first broad military hearing into the November attack. Hasan, a U.S.-born Muslim and Army psychiatrist, was shot during the incident and is paralyzed from the waist down.
NEWS
May 29, 2010 | By Tanalee Smith
Young Barry Obama is struggling with his pingpong shot. Or rather, 12-year-old Hasan Faruq Ali is struggling to play left-handed in imitation of the character he is portraying in a new Indonesian film, "Little Obama." "Hasan has the walk, he has the posture of Barry," said Slamet Djanuadi, a consultant on the film and a childhood friend of President Obama when he lived in Indonesia from 1967 to 1971. "But Barry was a better pingpong player," he laughed, watching Hasan hit the ball off the table.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan is paralyzed from the chest down. He waits in a small Texas county jail and has not been seen publicly in the six months since he was shot and charged with killing 13 people and wounding nearly three dozen others at the nearby Ft. Hood Army post. He is about to surface again. Early next month military attorneys will meet for a preliminary hearing on whether the 40-year-old Muslim who became an Army psychiatrist should be court-martialed and perhaps sentenced to die for the Nov. 5 assault.
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