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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993
Your editorial on the "repeal" of the Hatch Act (June 2) missed the point entirely. First, legislation currently before Congress does not call for "repeal" of the Hatch Act, only reform. The Hatch Act was originally enacted to protect federal employees from political pressure to support certain candidates. The Times misinformed the public by telling us that we would be "the losers" (as a result of) "political campaigning by mail carriers." The Hatch Act creates a second-class group of citizens.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Paul Pringle
A federal grand jury in Washington took testimony last year about then-U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis' role in a 2012 fundraiser for President Obama's reelection, according to a woman who said she appeared before the panel. Whittier resident Rebecca Zapanta, who is prominent in Latino political and philanthropic circles, told The Times she was summoned to testify in June about telephone conversations she had with Solis, now a leading candidate for an open seat on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.
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NEWS
November 29, 1987
By a 305-112 vote, the House passed and sent to the Senate a bill (HR 3400) enabling federal civilian employees to run for office and engage in other partisan political activity on their own time and away from the office. Federal employee unions supported the bill, while the Administration and the civic group Common Cause opposed it. The legislation repeals many of the Hatch Act's bans on partisan activity by civil servants while off duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Paul Pringle and Abby Sewell
A spokesman for former U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis said Monday it would be "inappropriate" for the L.A. county supervisorial candidate to say if she informed the president about an FBI inquiry into her involvement in a 2012 fundraiser for the Obama reelection campaign. Steve Barkan, who is advising Solis' county campaign, said in a statement that she had a “cordial” meeting with the FBI in November 2012 about her role inthe fundraiser at the La Fonda supper club in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 11, 1993
The House passed a bill (HR 20) easing the Hatch Act so that the 2.2 million federal civilian employees and 775,000 postal workers are free to engage in partisan politics other than running for state or federal office. The same measure was defeated a week earlier when it came to the floor under a shortcut procedure that required a two-thirds majority for passage.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate brushed aside a threatened veto by President Bush and voted 67 to 30 Thursday to revise the 1939 Hatch Act to allow federal civil service and postal workers to take a more active role in partisan politics. The law would still prohibit federal workers from engaging in political activities on the job and from running for office or soliciting campaign funds from the public.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
The House voted Wednesday to liberalize a half-century-old law that restricts the political rights of federal workers, but it retained a ban on those workers' running for federal office. The bill, approved 333 to 86, allows the nation's 3 million federal employees to run for some political offices, organize fund-raisers and publicly endorse candidates--as long as they do it on their own time. But it also includes an amendment, proposed by Nancy L. Johnson (R-Conn.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, ignoring the Bush Administration's most recent veto threat, Tuesday gave final congressional approval to legislation that would lift a 50-year-old prohibition against federal employees engaging in partisan political activity in their off-duty hours. The representatives voted 334 to 87, 52 votes more than the two-thirds majority required to override a veto, for a Senate-passed revision of the Hatch Act and sent it to the President over fresh objections from Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Paul Pringle
The FBI spoke to former U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis about her role in a 2012 fundraiser for President Obama , but she believes she did nothing wrong and does not know if the authorities are still investigating, her campaign consultant said Monday. Steve Barkan, a consultant for Solis' Board of Supervisors campaign, said in a statement that she had a “cordial” meeting with the FBI in November 2012 -- some eight months after the fundraiser at La Fonda supper club in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Paul Pringle and Abby Sewell
The FBI spoke with former U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis about her role in a 2012 fundraiser for President Obama, but the candidate for Los Angeles County supervisor believes she did nothing wrong and doesn't know if the inquiry is continuing, her campaign consultant said Monday. Steve Barkan, the campaign advisor, said in a statement that Solis had a "cordial" meeting with the FBI in November 2012 - about eight months after the fundraiser at the La Fonda supper club in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
Obama administration Cabinet members and senior aides are fanning out across the country in an aggressive fundraising drive, taking advantage of porous campaign finance laws that allow them to appear as marquee speakers and raise substantial money for the president's reelection effort. The Obama campaign's "Speaker Series" program turns Cabinet secretaries and top White House advisors into fundraising surrogates. For $5,000, a donor can get a kind of season pass to see officials when they come to town — a bargain compared with the $35,800 typically charged for dinner with President Obama.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
The invitation under the Obama campaign logo is simple enough: "Obama Speaker Series Inaugural Event, Featuring The Honorable Arne Duncan. " Duncan is the Obama administration's secretary of Education. Earlier this month, he spoke in front of several dozen people at a private home in Brentwood, Calif., as part of a new fundraising venture launched by the Obama reelection campaign. Donors pay for membership in the "speaker series" and in turn get to hear speeches from administration officials, senior campaign aides and White House alumni.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2007 | Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators have written a sharply worded critique of the beleaguered chief of the General Services Administration, Lurita Alexis Doan, accusing her of violating the law by improperly attempting to use her agency to help Republican political candidates. "The GSA administrator displayed no reservations in her willingness to commit GSA resources, including its human capital, to the Republican Party," the report says.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
An administrator with the Department of Health and Human Services resigned after saying he unknowingly violated a federal law by holding a fund-raiser for a congressional candidate from Pennsylvania. Michael Hash, acting administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration, held a fund-raiser at his house on May 4 for Democratic congressional candidate Ronald Strouse, said Jane McFarland, spokeswoman for the Office of Special Counsel, an independent agency of federal prosecutors.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal watchdog agency said Thursday that it has opened an inquiry into fund-raising activities by high-ranking career employees in the Agriculture Department for a political action committee that supported Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential election bid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993
The House sent President Clinton a bill (HR 20) softening the 1939 Hatch Act to allow 3 million U.S. civil servants and postal workers to engage in most areas of partisan politics on their owntime. Some 85,000 other employees, mostly in law enforcement, will remain "hatched." Supporter Andrew Jacobs Jr. (D-Ind.) said: "Right now, federal employees are second-class citizens, not fully participating in the system by which we make our final choices in this country." Opponent Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.
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